Experimental Design B/C

mpnobivucyxtz
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby mpnobivucyxtz » February 20th, 2018, 9:56 pm

I have a couple of other questions as well!

1. If our hypothesis isn’t supported, this doesn’t reflect poorly on us, right? Will a write up with an incorrect hypothesis / reasoning score lower than one with the same procedure / experiment, but with the right initial prediction?

2. In the analysis, am I allowed to provide reasoning for why our data was the way it was, even if we didn’t measure it / even if it’s speculation? For example, if we’re talking about a bouncing ball, can I explain that it bounced higher when dropped from a higher point because of impulse, even though we never directly measured the impulse? The rubric says “all statements must be supported by data” but I’m not sure whether that applies here.

3. What happens if you don’t have an outlier? Do you just state that in your analysis? How should this be worded?

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby Ambrosia » February 23rd, 2018, 12:30 pm

I have a couple of other questions as well!

1. If our hypothesis isn’t supported, this doesn’t reflect poorly on us, right? Will a write up with an incorrect hypothesis / reasoning score lower than one with the same procedure / experiment, but with the right initial prediction?

2. In the analysis, am I allowed to provide reasoning for why our data was the way it was, even if we didn’t measure it / even if it’s speculation? For example, if we’re talking about a bouncing ball, can I explain that it bounced higher when dropped from a higher point because of impulse, even though we never directly measured the impulse? The rubric says “all statements must be supported by data” but I’m not sure whether that applies here.

3. What happens if you don’t have an outlier? Do you just state that in your analysis? How should this be worded?
If your hypothesis isn't supported by the data it should be fine. That was something we were worried about too when it happened, but it shouldn't affect anything. We didn't get any points off. Just make sure to explain a possible reason why.

In terms of the analysis, sorry but I can't really help you with that. My partner does that section. However, you really should make sure to have an outlier in your data. It's much more convenient to be able to talk about it.

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dxu46
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby dxu46 » February 23rd, 2018, 4:06 pm

I have a couple of other questions as well!

1. If our hypothesis isn’t supported, this doesn’t reflect poorly on us, right? Will a write up with an incorrect hypothesis / reasoning score lower than one with the same procedure / experiment, but with the right initial prediction?

2. In the analysis, am I allowed to provide reasoning for why our data was the way it was, even if we didn’t measure it / even if it’s speculation? For example, if we’re talking about a bouncing ball, can I explain that it bounced higher when dropped from a higher point because of impulse, even though we never directly measured the impulse? The rubric says “all statements must be supported by data” but I’m not sure whether that applies here.

3. What happens if you don’t have an outlier? Do you just state that in your analysis? How should this be worded?
If your hypothesis isn't supported by the data it should be fine. That was something we were worried about too when it happened, but it shouldn't affect anything. We didn't get any points off. Just make sure to explain a possible reason why.

In terms of the analysis, sorry but I can't really help you with that. My partner does that section. However, you really should make sure to have an outlier in your data. It's much more convenient to be able to talk about it.
I would advise against making up data - at state last year the event supervisors would tier any teams who faked data.

mpnobivucyxtz
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby mpnobivucyxtz » February 23rd, 2018, 4:33 pm

I would advise against making up data.
How would they know unless they see you not doing the experiment? What would you do in the case there are no outliers?

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby dxu46 » February 24th, 2018, 11:18 am

I would advise against making up data.
How would they know unless they see you not doing the experiment? What would you do in the case there are no outliers?
The Event Supervisors in Missouri watch us. If you don't have an outlier, don't write about it.

mpnobivucyxtz
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby mpnobivucyxtz » February 24th, 2018, 1:20 pm

I would advise against making up data.
How would they know unless they see you not doing the experiment? What would you do in the case there are no outliers?
The Event Supervisors in Missouri watch us. If you don't have an outlier, don't write about it.
But it’s a rubric point right? So should i explicitly say “there were no unusual data points observed”

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dxu46
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby dxu46 » February 24th, 2018, 2:45 pm


How would they know unless they see you not doing the experiment? What would you do in the case there are no outliers?
The Event Supervisors in Missouri watch us. If you don't have an outlier, don't write about it.
But it’s a rubric point right? So should i explicitly say “there were no unusual data points observed”
I think you would just write something about how well the data follows a trend. IDK because I don't do analysis.

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby mpnobivucyxtz » February 24th, 2018, 3:58 pm

Are we allowed to use the materials we bring in as a part of the experiment? Like using the meterstick we bring in to make a ramp or something?

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dxu46
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby dxu46 » February 24th, 2018, 4:05 pm

Are we allowed to use the materials we bring in as a part of the experiment? Like using the meterstick we bring in to make a ramp or something?
I think so - we are allowed to use our own stopwatches, so why not metersticks?

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby kate! » February 24th, 2018, 4:16 pm

Are we allowed to use the materials we bring in as a part of the experiment? Like using the meterstick we bring in to make a ramp or something?
Like the ES at my invitational said, if everyone else has one, you can use it. (In reference to taping something to a table, but you get the idea.)
Two years ago I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Last year I knew stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
Now I'm learning stuff about oceanography, fossils, and writing/following instructions, yay for the third time!


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