Ecology B/C

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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby varunscs11 » Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:36 am

MIT 2017 and 2016. These were hard, well-written and you had to know the material very well to medal.
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby ThiccleRick » Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:17 pm

whats the difference between R and K
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby gneissisnice » Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:09 am

ThiccleRick wrote:whats the difference between R and K


R-selected species have lots of young at once, don't tend to raise their young, reproduce often, and usually have a quick maturation. They excel in high change environments by just pumping out tons of babies and hoping that some survive. Examples include insects, fish, and rodents.

K-selected species tend to only give birth to one or two young at a time, have a long maturation period with parental rearing, and reproduce infrequently. Unlike r-selected species, they have much higher survival rates for young and they are strong competitors.

One way I remember the difference is "r" for "rabbit" (infamous for having tons of babies very often) and "K" for "King Kong" (big, one of a kind). Or "Kangaroo" if you want your example to make more sense.
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby knottingpurple » Fri Dec 15, 2017 4:30 am

gneissisnice wrote:
ThiccleRick wrote:whats the difference between R and K


R-selected species have lots of young at once, don't tend to raise their young, reproduce often, and usually have a quick maturation. They excel in high change environments by just pumping out tons of babies and hoping that some survive. Examples include insects, fish, and rodents.

K-selected species tend to only give birth to one or two young at a time, have a long maturation period with parental rearing, and reproduce infrequently. Unlike r-selected species, they have much higher survival rates for young and they are strong competitors.

One way I remember the difference is "r" for "rabbit" (infamous for having tons of babies very often) and "K" for "King Kong" (big, one of a kind). Or "Kangaroo" if you want your example to make more sense.


I always remembered r and k selected species based on logistic growth - in logistic growth, r is the maximum rate of growth of the population while k is the carrying capacity. When a population is small and there are Abundance resources, it grows fast, close to the theoretical maximum rate of growth, and species that live in these environments are r selected, with the characteristics described above to allow them to reproduce quickly. When a population is close to being the maximum possible for the environment it's in, (where k, the carrying capacity, is the maximum number of organisms the environment can support, so when the population size is close to k), then it grows much more slowly, and organisms have to compete for resources much more so they develop, again, the characteristics outlined above to maximize the chances of each offspring surviving. (Also, was the original question about r and k strategists or r and k terms in logistic growth, it could be either right, more likely the former but...?

Basically the difference between these two types of strategies is that one maximizes the chances of each offspring surviving to reproduce and the other maximizes the chance of some of the offspring surviving to reproduce, but you have to remember that this is a continuum, not 2 separate entirely unrelated types of animals and plants. One classic example is an oak tree - it's mostly like a k-strategist because it grows slowly in stable environments with significant competition, but it also produces lots and lots of acorns in the hopes that a few acorns will avoid being eaten, land on a new patch of soil, get enough water and sunlight, so it's maximizing the number of offspring, rather than the chances of each offspring.
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby JakeTheCake » Thu Dec 21, 2017 8:43 pm

Yes i suggest using the wiki for info.

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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby CaTaStRoPhY » Mon Jan 15, 2018 7:51 pm

how to "calculate" trophic level of a certain organism??

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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby Fridaychimp » Wed Jan 17, 2018 6:21 pm

CaTaStRoPhY wrote:how to "calculate" trophic level of a certain organism??

Basically, just multiply the trophic level of everything it consumes by what percent of its diet it makes up, and then add all of it together.
Ex: Organism A eats Organism B and Organism C, which make up 60% and 40% of its diet, respectively. Organism B has trophic level 2, organism C has trophic level 3. Organism A's trophic level is 2.4.
2 * 0.6 + 3 * 0.4 = 2.4
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby knottingpurple » Fri Jan 19, 2018 1:34 am

Fridaychimp wrote:
CaTaStRoPhY wrote:how to "calculate" trophic level of a certain organism??

Basically, just multiply the trophic level of everything it consumes by what percent of its diet it makes up, and then add all of it together.
Ex: Organism A eats Organism B and Organism C, which make up 60% and 40% of its diet, respectively. Organism B has trophic level 2, organism C has trophic level 3. Organism A's trophic level is 2.4.
2 * 0.6 + 3 * 0.4 = 2.4


Taking the weighted average of the trophic levels as Fridaychimp wrote is shown correctly, but you also have to add 1 to the result to get Organism A's trophic level. An organism is always going to be 1 trophic level higher than what it eats, whether working with fractional trophic levels or counting up in integral levels from the bottom of a trophic pyramid. If what it eats has an average trophic level of 2.4, the organism's trophic level is 3.4
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby CaTaStRoPhY » Fri Jan 19, 2018 2:55 am

Fridaychimp wrote:
CaTaStRoPhY wrote:how to "calculate" trophic level of a certain organism??

Basically, just multiply the trophic level of everything it consumes by what percent of its diet it makes up, and then add all of it together.
Ex: Organism A eats Organism B and Organism C, which make up 60% and 40% of its diet, respectively. Organism B has trophic level 2, organism C has trophic level 3. Organism A's trophic level is 2.4.
2 * 0.6 + 3 * 0.4 = 2.4


Thanks!

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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby CaTaStRoPhY » Fri Jan 19, 2018 2:56 am

knottingpurple wrote:
Fridaychimp wrote:
CaTaStRoPhY wrote:how to "calculate" trophic level of a certain organism??

Basically, just multiply the trophic level of everything it consumes by what percent of its diet it makes up, and then add all of it together.
Ex: Organism A eats Organism B and Organism C, which make up 60% and 40% of its diet, respectively. Organism B has trophic level 2, organism C has trophic level 3. Organism A's trophic level is 2.4.
2 * 0.6 + 3 * 0.4 = 2.4


Taking the weighted average of the trophic levels as Fridaychimp wrote is shown correctly, but you also have to add 1 to the result to get Organism A's trophic level. An organism is always going to be 1 trophic level higher than what it eats, whether working with fractional trophic levels or counting up in integral levels from the bottom of a trophic pyramid. If what it eats has an average trophic level of 2.4, the organism's trophic level is 3.4


Got it, thx!

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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby shubhsuper » Sat Jan 20, 2018 12:21 am

Does anyone have any study recommendations for Ecology Division B for Wright State University? For reference I got 5th last year and I hope to do even better this year. Particularly something that goes in depth for Ecological principles and a resource for Conservational Biology as I am quite new to it.

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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby Alex-RCHS » Mon Jan 29, 2018 1:50 am

From the practice tests that you guys have taken, which ones would you most recommend?
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby Fridaychimp » Tue Jan 30, 2018 11:05 pm

Alex-RCHS wrote:From the practice tests that you guys have taken, which ones would you most recommend?

I think it really depends on what tournament you're prepping for. For instance, if you were studying for MiT, which traditionally runs stations that emphasize vocab, a similar test would be helpful, such as Clements from this year. On the other hand, if you're expecting a long paper test, you'll be better off looking at tests such as Entymology's SSSS submission. Other than those, I liked Johns Creek and UGA, while Boca Raton was particularly well written.
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby JoeyC » Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:30 am

What are the hardest type of questions out there? I've done Ecology many times, but it's always been so flat out easy, with one or two questions being the tipping point between getting 1st or 16th. Mainly, I feel that its luck on whether you know the answers to the hard questions (ex: if you intensely study a topic but then have no questions on given topic but get 3 hard questions on another topic). Does anyone have any advice? Thanks.
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Re: Ecology B/C

Postby Polarrr » Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:57 am

JoeyC wrote:What are the hardest type of questions out there? I've done Ecology many times, but it's always been so flat out easy, with one or two questions being the tipping point between getting 1st or 16th. Mainly, I feel that its luck on whether you know the answers to the hard questions (ex: if you intensely study a topic but then have no questions on given topic but get 3 hard questions on another topic). Does anyone have any advice? Thanks.


Honestly, I've seen a wide range of the questions some event supervisors put on their tests. Some are heavily conservation ecology based while others are population ecology based. Many of the tests I've seen have extremely hard vocabulary questions or ecology questions that you may have never heard of. This wide range makes it really hard to prepare and know what will be on the test.


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