Herpetology B/C

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Raven » March 13th, 2018, 7:24 am

Fellas, when genus Typhlomolge is searched up on the internet, the result that appears is genus Eurycea. When searched on CNAH, it is non-existent. Since the internet is of no use, does anyone have a solid way of identifying genus Typhlomolge?
Typhlomolge is according to almost all sources, part of Eurycea. The annoying taxonomy problems/issues across herpetology is exemplified here. If you're finding information for them, just type in the common name (Texas blind or Blanco blind).
I'd like to say that a lot of other genuses/families on the list also have blind cave salamanders (e.g. the olm). They all look pretty pale/pink and weak because evolution.
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Raven » March 13th, 2018, 7:33 am

Hey, does anybody have some good tips for identification in the Family Plethodontidae (Lungless Salamanders)??
As in telling apart the genus's in the family? or the family from other families?
Mainly telling apart the genera from other genera.
Desmognathus: head shape very distinct, keeled tail
Plethodon: way bigger than desmo, round tail
Ensatina: bright orange, sometimes black with bright yellow, basically bright colors, also relatively short and fat, head has a kinda eye bulge, also suggest memorizing individual species
Aneides: its head usually has two large glands, it has different feet that resemble toe pads sorta, what usually throws ppl off is the black salamander cuz it looks like Plethodon, but you gotta look at its feet, Aneides has naasty teeth
Hydromantes: head is in a pointed shape, looks like a batra head except it's not long
Batrachoseps: it's hella long and long tail, and if u see a sal curled up like a snake it's gotta be a batra
Hemidactylium: underside
Gyrinophilus: nose things on face, pattern thing idek what to call it
Pseudotriton: the black spots are super distinct compared to lighter spots on gyrinophilus, the red sal is bright red the mud sal is brownish, but their black spots are BLACK
Eurycea: small, thin, memorize the individual species (there's the orange/black spots one and the two lined ones, etc.)
Typhlomolge: pale, blind, pinkish, arms are the skinniest things

I just type this on a whim, there are other things we've noticed but its sorta just intuitive at this point, hopefully that's enough?
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby matematika » March 17th, 2018, 6:03 pm

I know this question has sort of already been asked, but for our Regionals we got 2 minutes per slide, how long is it usually for States?
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Kyanite » March 17th, 2018, 7:22 pm

I know this question has sort of already been asked, but for our Regionals we got 2 minutes per slide, how long is it usually for States?
This can vary widely as it depends on the test writer, but expect to have to answer more questions in a shorter period of time.

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby windu34 » March 17th, 2018, 7:35 pm

I know this question has sort of already been asked, but for our Regionals we got 2 minutes per slide, how long is it usually for States?
This will depend on what the ES chooses to make it. Between 2-3 mins and 4-6 questions is common, but different supervisors choose to make it easier/harder.
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby soscioly » March 19th, 2018, 10:55 am

how are you guys identifying mole salamanders?
also in the case that they dont show the square glands for torrent salamanders, what do you guys go off of in identifying them?

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Entomology » March 19th, 2018, 5:38 pm

Has anyone figured out reliable ID for snakes? Aside from the genera with obvious coloration (Ex Diadophis, Opheodrys, Thamnophis) I have some trouble differentiating between the remainder of the snakes consistently because coloration is so variable.
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Froggie » March 19th, 2018, 6:00 pm

how are you guys identifying mole salamanders?
also in the case that they dont show the square glands for torrent salamanders, what do you guys go off of in identifying them?
I go by “Mole salamanders are fat”, it’s not reliable but it worked the one time it was on a test.
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby soscioly » March 20th, 2018, 10:18 am

thanks!
another question - are there 6 or 7 species in genus cheloniidae? Some sources say that the leatherback is a part of cheloniidae but others don't... I'm not quite sure what to put when I encounter that question on tests.

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Kyanite » March 20th, 2018, 1:27 pm

thanks!
another question - are there 6 or 7 species in genus cheloniidae? Some sources say that the leatherback is a part of cheloniidae but others don't... I'm not quite sure what to put when I encounter that question on tests.
I have been going off of US government websites when I can, this has allowed me to establish a baseline for my notes. The sites I have referenced place the leather back sea turtle under an entirely different family (Dermochelys not Cheloniidae) , so I would say there are 6 genuses in Cheloniidae.

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