Herpetology B/C

SciNerd42
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby SciNerd42 » January 29th, 2018, 8:51 am

Hi! We've taken now 2 Herpetology tests where it asks us to ID the individual species for example Eastern Box Turtle vs. Box Turtle or Spring Peeper vs. Chorus Frog. I was under the impression we just had to identify up to what the list says, and if that is the case how to I prevent that from happening at future tournaments? do we have the right to appeal this?

Thoughts?

ScottMaurer19
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby ScottMaurer19 » January 29th, 2018, 8:55 am

Hi! We've taken now 2 Herpetology tests where it asks us to ID the individual species for example Eastern Box Turtle vs. Box Turtle or Spring Peeper vs. Chorus Frog. I was under the impression we just had to identify up to what the list says, and if that is the case how to I prevent that from happening at future tournaments? do we have the right to appeal this?

Thoughts?
According to the FAQ on the national website, you should NOT have to ID species. This however does not appear to be how many ESs have been running it seeing as they are still asking species identification and species specific questions (Centerville test asked for common name but the common names given on the official list were marked wrong). A North American species specific question for example is How does the brahminy blind snake reproduce? They are parthenogenic. Only one species, an invasive species from Asia to the US, is actually parthenogenic but they generalize it to the entire genus.
Solon '19 Captain, CWRU '23
2017 (r/s/n):
Hydro: 3/5/18
Robot Arm: na/1/1
Rocks: 1/1/1

2018 (r/s/n):
Heli: 2/1/7 
Herp: 1/4/4
Mission: 1/1/6
Rocks: 1/1/1
Eco: 6/3/9

2019 (r/s/n):
Fossils: 1/1/1
GLM: 1/1/1
Herp: 1/1/5
Mission: 1/1/3
WS: 4/1/10

Top 3 Medals: 144
Golds: 80

SciNerd42
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby SciNerd42 » January 29th, 2018, 9:01 am

According to the FAQ on the national website, you should NOT have to ID species. This however does not appear to be how many ESs have been running it seeing as they are still asking species identification and species specific questions (Centerville test asked for common name but the common names given on the official list were marked wrong). A North American species specific question for example is How does the brahminy blind snake reproduce? They are parthenogenic. Only one species, an invasive species from Asia to the US, is actually parthenogenic but they generalize it to the entire genus.
I was specifically thinking of the Northmont and Centerville tests. I guess what I am asking, is how do I prevent this from happening at regionals and state when we don't get to see the tests back.

ScottMaurer19
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby ScottMaurer19 » January 29th, 2018, 9:03 am

According to the FAQ on the national website, you should NOT have to ID species. This however does not appear to be how many ESs have been running it seeing as they are still asking species identification and species specific questions (Centerville test asked for common name but the common names given on the official list were marked wrong). A North American species specific question for example is How does the brahminy blind snake reproduce? They are parthenogenic. Only one species, an invasive species from Asia to the US, is actually parthenogenic but they generalize it to the entire genus.
I was specifically thinking of the Northmont and Centerville tests. I guess what I am asking, is how do I prevent this from happening at regionals and state when we don't get to see the tests back.
Uhhhhhh I'm honestly at a loss for this but I have the same concerns. Best bet is to have your head coach email the tournament directors for each one and ask them if they could check the Herpetology tests to ensure that they follow the FAQ and then hope they acknowledge and are willing to do something.
Solon '19 Captain, CWRU '23
2017 (r/s/n):
Hydro: 3/5/18
Robot Arm: na/1/1
Rocks: 1/1/1

2018 (r/s/n):
Heli: 2/1/7 
Herp: 1/4/4
Mission: 1/1/6
Rocks: 1/1/1
Eco: 6/3/9

2019 (r/s/n):
Fossils: 1/1/1
GLM: 1/1/1
Herp: 1/1/5
Mission: 1/1/3
WS: 4/1/10

Top 3 Medals: 144
Golds: 80

SciNerd42
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby SciNerd42 » January 29th, 2018, 10:34 am

According to the FAQ on the national website, you should NOT have to ID species. This however does not appear to be how many ESs have been running it seeing as they are still asking species identification and species specific questions (Centerville test asked for common name but the common names given on the official list were marked wrong). A North American species specific question for example is How does the brahminy blind snake reproduce? They are parthenogenic. Only one species, an invasive species from Asia to the US, is actually parthenogenic but they generalize it to the entire genus.
Also the FAQ seems to be contradictory. Yes, you don't have to identify species level, only genus level is the answer to one question. But the other question is yes you have to be able to identify specific Anurans to species level.

matematika
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby matematika » January 29th, 2018, 11:29 am

Are green iguanas representative enough of the Iguanidae family?
2017 - Herpetology, Dynamic Planet, Solar System

Froggie
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Froggie » January 29th, 2018, 1:54 pm

Are green iguanas representative enough of the Iguanidae family?
Desert iguanas and Chuckwallas are also part of the Iguanidae family, so you should definitly put them in your binder.
"A lot of people have quotes in their signature. Maybe I should have a quote in my signature. "
- Froggie

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Froggie » January 29th, 2018, 1:54 pm

Are green iguanas representative enough of the Iguanidae family?
Desert iguanas and Chuckwallas are also part of the Iguanidae family, so you should definitly put them in your binder.
"A lot of people have quotes in their signature. Maybe I should have a quote in my signature. "
- Froggie

Avalanche
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Avalanche » January 29th, 2018, 5:09 pm

In the official list, Anolis is under Polychridae, but by Wikipedia and many other sites:
Previously, it was classified under the invalid Polychrotidae family that contained all the anoles including Polychrus, but recent studies place it under Dactyloidae.[2]
Yeah we noticed that too, it seems like the list is a bit outdated. Just follow the list, I guess.
For people who are still improving binders, anoles are on the test, so make sure to include anoles.
Boyceville/Gopher/Regionals/State
Herpetology: 3/2/-/2
Solar System: 12/2/-/5
Road Scholar: -/-/2/1
Experimental Design: -/1/-/-

Benewcomb
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Benewcomb » January 31st, 2018, 8:40 am

Dang I must have struck gold. I asked my partner what I he didn’t know so I could study it and he said there is nothing. I still want to study, so do you know any small and hard to notice facts I should research?
It’s gonna be me!


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