Solar System B

JionPark
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Re: Solar System B

Postby JionPark » March 15th, 2018, 4:04 pm

Do we have to know the successful missions to space from a long time back?
Yes sir!
Try to know the usefulness of those successful missions.

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Re: Solar System B

Postby JionPark » March 15th, 2018, 4:08 pm

Hello, I was taking a solar system test recently and realized that there are some important question about vocab, I didn't have any chance at this section.

I was wondering anybody had website with vocab terms?
Was the vocab words related to the topics covered by the manual?
Maybe quizlet?
Last edited by JionPark on March 21st, 2018, 5:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Solar System B

Postby JionPark » March 15th, 2018, 4:13 pm

How do I know which specific features (i.e caloris basin) are important to study?

Do you have a partner?

If so, divide the work with your partner. Wikipedia is useful to use because Wikipedia will contain lots of information about the terrestrial planets and other rocky bodies that will be covered in the manual. Knowing caloris basin is a good start.

Try this link for Mercury: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of ... on_Mercury
Try this link for Venus: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of ... s_on_Venus
Try this link for Mars: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_ ... es_of_Mars

There are other links similar to this one towards the other rocky bodies.

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Re: Solar System B

Postby genew » March 27th, 2018, 8:21 pm

Hi, so I got put in this event right before state competition and I have a question from one of the practice questions that I don’t know how to do. Is there a way to do this with one of Kepler’s Laws?
You observe a binary system with a period of 32 years and an average separation of 16 AU. Star A is 12 AU away from the center of mass, and star B is 4 AU away from the center of mass. What is the total mass of this system, and what are the individual masses of star A and star B? Give your answer in solar masses.

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Re: Solar System B

Postby wellOKthen » March 29th, 2018, 3:16 pm

Based on the previouse tests I would expect some questions about different astroid belt bodies (ceres, vesta, ect.) and some trivia about the general solar system. :D

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Re: Solar System B

Postby EastStroudsburg13 » March 30th, 2018, 5:29 am

Hi, so I got put in this event right before state competition and I have a question from one of the practice questions that I don’t know how to do. Is there a way to do this with one of Kepler’s Laws?
You observe a binary system with a period of 32 years and an average separation of 16 AU. Star A is 12 AU away from the center of mass, and star B is 4 AU away from the center of mass. What is the total mass of this system, and what are the individual masses of star A and star B? Give your answer in solar masses.
This is based on a variation of Kepler's Third Law. The form to use is , where a is in AU, p is in year, and m and M are the masses of the bodies in solar masses. Based on this you should get solar masses.

The distribution of mass between the stars is inversely proportional to the distribution of distances from the center of mass. In this case, you can take the distance of star A from the center of mass, and divide it by the total separation, and then subtract that from 1, and multiply that resulting number by the total amount of solar masses. So, , and solar mass for star A. And then you can subtract 1 from the total of 4 to get 3 solar masses for Star B.

If you wanted to figure out the mass of star B first you would do the same thing, except using 4 AU instead of 12. , solar masses for star B, and then solar mass for star A.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby matematika » April 1st, 2018, 2:18 pm

Is there some list of challenging Solar System vocabulary? I try to Google things up, but I just end up with fourth-grade material. Thanks!
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Re: Solar System B

Postby AlphaTauri » April 1st, 2018, 7:01 pm

I wrote a test! (syo helped.)

Perhaps not amazingly useful this late in the season, since it's written to be Regionals-level, but in my opinion it is a pretty decent test.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby matematika » April 3rd, 2018, 8:23 am

Wow nice!! Yeah, it's kinda late now, but do you have a States-level practice?

I feel like the material for Regionals, States, and Nationals can't differ too much (since there is a limited amount of material you can be tested on), and it's really just based on tiebreakers? That's what happened at Regionals for us -- I swear like the top 5 had score differences of 1 or 2, and there were 3 tiebreakers (#100, #99, #98, etc. correct answers, for example).
2017 - Herpetology, Dynamic Planet, Solar System

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Re: Solar System B

Postby JoeyC » April 4th, 2018, 3:53 pm

Does anyone know what the rules refer to when it talks about satellite measurements and imagery? Thanks!
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