Thermodynamics B/C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
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WhatScience?
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » September 10th, 2017, 12:22 pm

answer the above question please
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby wzhang5460 » September 11th, 2017, 1:58 pm

Kavar wrote:
wzhang5460 wrote:D
Credits to Khan Academy lol.

I believe you are mistaken. The answer should be C if you cancel out the values correctly. Credits to Khan Academy ;) :D .


Sorry, I typed the wrong letter. Haha
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » September 12th, 2017, 3:37 pm

WhatScience? wrote:
WhatScience? wrote:Question: van der waals equation is a correction of the ideal gas law. In which three scenarios is it most applicable and what is the reasoning behind the changes made to the equation?
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby raxu » October 6th, 2017, 3:36 pm

I only know two scenarios: when the molecules are relatively large (e.g. octane) and when there is strong intermolecular interactions (e.g. water vapor).

The equation is . The correction factor accounts for intermolecular interactions, and the correction factor accounts for size of gases.

The bob temperature scale is a linear temperature scale where at 1 atm, water freezes at 42°B and boils at 239°B. Convert -53 °C to °B.
Last edited by raxu on October 9th, 2017, 6:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » October 9th, 2017, 2:42 pm

raxu wrote:I only know two scenarios: when the molecules are relatively large (e.g. octane) and when there is strong intermolecular interactions (e.g. water vapor).

The equation is . The correction factor accounts for intermolecular interactions, and the correction factor accounts for size of gases.

The bob temperature scale is a linear temperature scale where at 1 atm, water freezes at 42°B and boils at 239°B. Convert -53 °C to °B.


The equation part is right but the three scenarios I was looking for was any scenario where the molecules are crowded together: High pressure, Low Temperature, and High Density

Either way, your turn.
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » November 2nd, 2017, 5:29 am

raxu wrote:I only know two scenarios: when the molecules are relatively large (e.g. octane) and when there is strong intermolecular interactions (e.g. water vapor).

The equation is . The correction factor accounts for intermolecular interactions, and the correction factor accounts for size of gases.

The bob temperature scale is a linear temperature scale where at 1 atm, water freezes at 42°B and boils at 239°B. Convert -53 °C to °B.


Hey, I am pretty much quoting you to give you a notification that it is your turn to give a question.
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby shrewdPanther46 » November 2nd, 2017, 5:37 am

Il jump in here (even tho im not doing the event...)

What factor of a reaction must be negative for it to be spontaneous?

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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » November 2nd, 2017, 7:45 am

shrewdPanther46 wrote:Il jump in here (even tho im not doing the event...)

What factor of a reaction must be negative for it to be spontaneous?


In the equation for Gibbs free Energy Delta G should end up negative for the reaction to be spontaneous.
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby raxu » November 3rd, 2017, 7:43 pm

WhatScience? wrote:
raxu wrote:I only know two scenarios: when the molecules are relatively large (e.g. octane) and when there is strong intermolecular interactions (e.g. water vapor).

The equation is . The correction factor accounts for intermolecular interactions, and the correction factor accounts for size of gases.

The bob temperature scale is a linear temperature scale where at 1 atm, water freezes at 42°B and boils at 239°B. Convert -53 °C to °B.


Hey, I am pretty much quoting you to give you a notification that it is your turn to give a question.

There is a question in there :)
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » November 4th, 2017, 7:58 am

raxu wrote:
WhatScience? wrote:
raxu wrote:I only know two scenarios: when the molecules are relatively large (e.g. octane) and when there is strong intermolecular interactions (e.g. water vapor).

The equation is . The correction factor accounts for intermolecular interactions, and the correction factor accounts for size of gases.

The bob temperature scale is a linear temperature scale where at 1 atm, water freezes at 42°B and boils at 239°B. Convert -53 °C to °B.


Hey, I am pretty much quoting you to give you a notification that it is your turn to give a question.

There is a question in there :)


So here are my calculation...there are 1.97 degrees Celsius for every 1 degree Bob.

42-(53*1.97)=-62.41

So my guess is -62.41 degrees B. Is this correct? I highly doubt it as I have never seen a problem like this.
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » November 4th, 2017, 8:21 am

WhatScience? wrote:
raxu wrote:
WhatScience? wrote:
Hey, I am pretty much quoting you to give you a notification that it is your turn to give a question.

There is a question in there :)


So here are my calculation...there are 1.97 degrees Celsius for every 1 degree Bob.

42-(53*1.97)=-62.41

So my guess is -62.41 degrees B. Is this correct? I highly doubt it as I have never seen a problem like this.


I further believe this calculation because I created an equation for Celsius as x related to Bob as y and this is what came up. Very interesting question. Made me think.
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » November 5th, 2017, 6:11 pm

raxu wrote:
WhatScience? wrote:
raxu wrote:I only know two scenarios: when the molecules are relatively large (e.g. octane) and when there is strong intermolecular interactions (e.g. water vapor).

The equation is . The correction factor accounts for intermolecular interactions, and the correction factor accounts for size of gases.

The bob temperature scale is a linear temperature scale where at 1 atm, water freezes at 42°B and boils at 239°B. Convert -53 °C to °B.


Hey, I am pretty much quoting you to give you a notification that it is your turn to give a question.

There is a question in there :)


Can I go???

Am I right???
"When you clean your room, you are increasing the total chaos of the universe" - Hank Green Crash Course (Entropy)

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Thermodynamics, Potions and Poisons, Disease Detectives, Optics, and Towers

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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby raxu » November 5th, 2017, 6:57 pm

Yes! Go for it!
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby WhatScience? » November 5th, 2017, 6:59 pm

raxu wrote:Yes! Go for it!


Convection is a form of heat transfer among fluids. What is the basic property that allows it to work?
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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Postby platinumfalcon » November 8th, 2017, 7:42 am

[hide]
Convection is heat transfer by the mass movement of molecules from one place to another (Giancoli). Convection occurs because hot fluids rise. This is because when a fluid is heated, in most cases, its volume increases. Thus, its density decreases, and it experiences a buoyant force propelling it upwards. [/hide]

Next question: During photosynthesis, cells combine "disorderly" compounds (CO2 and H2O) into "orderly" glucose molecules. Is this a violation of the second law of thermodynamics?


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