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Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: June 22nd, 2018, 2:23 pm
by Things2do
All right :) What's the constant pressure molar heat capacity of an ideal diatomic gas?
C
That's probably not what you're looking for, but it is technically correct...

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: June 23rd, 2018, 2:14 pm
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
All right :) What's the constant pressure molar heat capacity of an ideal diatomic gas?
C
That's probably not what you're looking for, but it is technically correct...
What's the value of C

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: June 23rd, 2018, 5:50 pm
by Things2do
All right :) What's the constant pressure molar heat capacity of an ideal diatomic gas?
C
That's probably not what you're looking for, but it is technically correct...
What's the value of C
Oops, it's Cp, not C.

I don't remember a numerical value... I remember equations existing, but I don't remember how to do 'em... It's summer.

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: June 24th, 2018, 9:18 pm
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
C
That's probably not what you're looking for, but it is technically correct...
What's the value of C
Oops, it's Cp, not C.

I don't remember a numerical value... I remember equations existing, but I don't remember how to do 'em... It's summer.
...What's the value of Cp then :P

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: June 26th, 2018, 5:06 pm
by Justin72835
What's the value of C
Oops, it's Cp, not C.

I don't remember a numerical value... I remember equations existing, but I don't remember how to do 'em... It's summer.
...What's the value of Cp then :P
5/2R for a monatomic gas and 7/2R for a diatomic gas.

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: June 26th, 2018, 5:11 pm
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Oops, it's Cp, not C.

I don't remember a numerical value... I remember equations existing, but I don't remember how to do 'em... It's summer.
...What's the value of Cp then :P
5/2R for a monatomic gas and 7/2R for a diatomic gas.
Yep your turn

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: June 26th, 2018, 5:16 pm
by Justin72835
Yep your turn
A glass bulb of volume 300 cubic centimeters is connected to another of volume 200 cubic centimeters by means of a tube of negligible volume. The bulbs contain dry air and are both at a common temperature and pressure of 20 degrees Celcius and 1.000 atm. The larger bulb is immersed in steam at 100 degrees Celcius and the smaller bulb is immersed in melting ice at 0 degrees Celcius. What is the final common pressure?

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: June 26th, 2018, 7:37 pm
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Yep your turn
A glass bulb of volume 300 cubic centimeters is connected to another of volume 200 cubic centimeters by means of a tube of negligible volume. The bulbs contain dry air and are both at a common temperature and pressure of 20 degrees Celcius and 1.000 atm. The larger bulb is immersed in steam at 100 degrees Celcius and the smaller bulb is immersed in melting ice at 0 degrees Celcius. What is the final common pressure?