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Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2017, 5:45 am
by WhatScience?
I do not know what happened to this but 2018!!! Thermo!!!!

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2017, 5:56 am
by WhatScience?
A person wants to replace the window on their house, but they don't want their heating and cooling bills to change. The original window on the wall of the house has area A, thickness d, and is made out of glass that has a thermal conduction constant k. Which one of the following changes could be made to the window that would leave the rate of thermal conduction the same as the original window?

A: double the area, cut the thickness in half, cut the k constant in half

B: cut the area in half, cut the thickness in half, and double the k constant

C: quadruple the area, double the thickness, cut the k constant in half

D: double the area, double the thickness, quadruple the k constant

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2017, 5:58 am
by EastStroudsburg13
WhatScience? wrote:I do not know what happened to this but 2018!!! Thermo!!!!

When site rollover occurs from the 2017 to 2018 seasons, the old event threads get archived so that new threads can be created. This is done so that discussions about new rules and updates can happen in their own threads, as opposed to continuations of threads from the previous year.

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2017, 6:03 am
by WhatScience?
EastStroudsburg13 wrote:
WhatScience? wrote:I do not know what happened to this but 2018!!! Thermo!!!!

When site rollover occurs from the 2017 to 2018 seasons, the old event threads get archived so that new threads can be created. This is done so that discussions about new rules and updates can happen in their own threads, as opposed to continuations of threads from the previous year.


Oh, thx.

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 6th, 2017, 5:46 pm
by WhatScience?
WhatScience? wrote:A person wants to replace the window on their house, but they don't want their heating and cooling bills to change. The original window on the wall of the house has area A, thickness d, and is made out of glass that has a thermal conduction constant k. Which one of the following changes could be made to the window that would leave the rate of thermal conduction the same as the original window?

A: double the area, cut the thickness in half, cut the k constant in half

B: cut the area in half, cut the thickness in half, and double the k constant

C: quadruple the area, double the thickness, cut the k constant in half

D: double the area, double the thickness, quadruple the k constant


ummm Guys

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 7th, 2017, 6:19 pm
by wzhang5460
D
Credits to Khan Academy lol.

Who was the scientist who came up with the basic ideas of the Second Law of Thermodynamics?

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 8th, 2017, 1:48 pm
by WhatScience?
Rudolf Julius Emanuel Clausis

A steel part that has the temperature of 700 degrees C is put into an oil bath to cool down. The bath must operate in between 25 and 30 degrees C. You want to use the smallest amount of oil possible to cool down the part. If the oil bath is starts at 25 C, what is the minimum amount of oil required of quench a steel part that is 175 grams?

specific heat of oil = 0.5 calories/gram C

specific heat of steel = 0.107 calories/gram C

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 8th, 2017, 6:36 pm
by Alex-RCHS
WhatScience? wrote:Rudolf Julius Emanuel Clausis

A steel part that has the temperature of 700 degrees C is put into an oil bath to cool down. The bath must operate in between 25 and 30 degrees C. You want to use the smallest amount of oil possible to cool down the part. If the oil bath is starts at 25 C, what is the minimum amount of oil required of quench a steel part that is 175 grams?

specific heat of oil = 0.5 calories/gram C

specific heat of steel = 0.107 calories/gram C

Answer
5018.3g

Next question: Explain the 0th law of thermodynamics.
I have the ACT tomorrow why am I doing this lol

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 9th, 2017, 6:44 am
by WhatScience?
If thermodynamic system a is in equilibrium with thermodynamic system c, and thermodynamic system c is in equilibrium with thermodynamic system b, thermodynamic systems a and b are also in equilibrium.

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 9th, 2017, 6:45 am
by WhatScience?
Explain the difference in between entropy driven and enthalpy driven reactions.

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 9th, 2017, 8:55 am
by Raleway
WhatScience? wrote:Explain the difference in between entropy driven and enthalpy driven reactions.


When using Gibb's Free Energy Equation (dG = dH - TdS) or any derivative form of that with Enthalpy and Entropy in it, that the larger of the two expressions (entropy or enthalpy) that make the reaction spontaneous will be said to have "driven" the reaction.

Question: When reading a phase change diagram. describe the kinetic energy at the triple point relative to the other three states' kinetic energy.

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 9th, 2017, 10:32 am
by WhatScience?
Raleway wrote:Question: When reading a phase change diagram. describe the kinetic energy at the triple point relative to the other three states' kinetic energy.


This is what I have in relation to a phase change diagram of water. Statements would be different for something like the diagram of carbon dioxide...

The triple point is at the highest average kinetic energy possible for a solid.

A gas' average kinetic energy will be higher than the triple point when the amount of pressure is above the triple point, but lower than the triple point when the pressure is lower than the triple point.

Since at most pressure levels, liquid has a freezing point and a boiling point, the average kinetic energy of a liquid can at any given pressure be both higher or lower than the average kinetic energy at the triple point.

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 9th, 2017, 10:46 am
by WhatScience?
Question: van der waals equation is a correction of the ideal gas law. In which three scenarios is it most applicable and what is the reasoning behind the changes made to the equation?

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 10th, 2017, 10:01 am
by Kavar
wzhang5460 wrote:D
Credits to Khan Academy lol.

I believe you are mistaken. The answer should be C if you cancel out the values correctly. Credits to Khan Academy ;) :D .

Re: Thermodynamics B/C

Posted: September 10th, 2017, 12:22 pm
by WhatScience?
WhatScience? wrote:Question: van der waals equation is a correction of the ideal gas law. In which three scenarios is it most applicable and what is the reasoning behind the changes made to the equation?