Microbe Mission B/C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
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Alex-RCHS
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Microbe Mission B/C

Postby Alex-RCHS » September 5th, 2017, 2:08 pm

Welcome to the Question Marathon for Microbe Mission in 2018!
Short Description: Teams will answer questions, solve problems, and analyze data pertaining to microbes.

Etiquette reminder! When answering a question, either hide your answer or use the "spoiler" function.

First Question:
1. Are antibiotics more effective on gram positive or gram negative bacteria? Why?
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whythelongface
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby whythelongface » September 6th, 2017, 12:54 pm

Gram-positive: the peptidoglycan layer in G- bacteria that resists staining also works against antibiotics entering the cell.
Last edited by whythelongface on September 6th, 2017, 1:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
WEST WINDSOR-PLAINSBORO HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH '18
EMORY UNIVERSITY '22
SONT 2017 5th Place Medalist [Microbe Mission]

"One little Sciolyer left all alone,
He went out and hanged himself and then there were none."

Congratulations to WW-P South for winning 14th place at Nationals!

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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby Alex-RCHS » September 6th, 2017, 1:40 pm

whythelongface wrote:Gram-positive: the peptidoglycan layer in G- bacteria that resists staining also works against antibiotics entering the cell.

Not quite
It is gram positive, but it's actually because the outer membrane present on gram negative bacteria prevents the antibiotics from entering the cell.

Your turn.
Last edited by Alex-RCHS on September 6th, 2017, 2:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby whythelongface » September 6th, 2017, 1:53 pm

When naming strains of influenza, what do H and N stand for, and why are H and N integral to the viral cycle?
WEST WINDSOR-PLAINSBORO HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH '18
EMORY UNIVERSITY '22
SONT 2017 5th Place Medalist [Microbe Mission]

"One little Sciolyer left all alone,
He went out and hanged himself and then there were none."

Congratulations to WW-P South for winning 14th place at Nationals!

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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby The48thYoshi » September 9th, 2017, 8:37 am

whythelongface wrote:When naming strains of influenza, what do H and N stand for, and why are H and N integral to the viral cycle?


Excited for season to start again!
H stands for Hemagglutinin and N for neuraminidase. They are proteins on the surface of the virus and help with attachment
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby whythelongface » September 9th, 2017, 8:51 am

The48thYoshi wrote:
whythelongface wrote:When naming strains of influenza, what do H and N stand for, and why are H and N integral to the viral cycle?


Excited for season to start again!
H stands for Hemagglutinin and N for neuraminidase. They are proteins on the surface of the virus and help with attachment


Correct! Specifically, hemagglutinin aids in attachment and neuraminidase in separation from the host cell. Your turn!
WEST WINDSOR-PLAINSBORO HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH '18
EMORY UNIVERSITY '22
SONT 2017 5th Place Medalist [Microbe Mission]

"One little Sciolyer left all alone,
He went out and hanged himself and then there were none."

Congratulations to WW-P South for winning 14th place at Nationals!

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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby The48thYoshi » September 9th, 2017, 11:04 am

A. What are magnetosomes?
B. What kind of organisms have these organelles?
C. What is their function?
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby Alex-RCHS » September 9th, 2017, 11:23 am

The48thYoshi wrote:A. What are magnetosomes?
B. What kind of organisms have these organelles?
C. What is their function?

I only briefly read this a long time ago, but here goes nothing:
Answer?
A. A type of plastid (multi-membraned organelle resulting from endosymbiosis) that can detect magnetic fields.
B. This is where I'm not sure. Bacteria, I think. Is it a type of bacteria that metabolically certain metals?
C. They detect magnetic fields and allow the cells that contain them to orient around these magnetic fields in search of some sort of nutrient.
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby The48thYoshi » September 10th, 2017, 12:01 pm

Alex-RCHS wrote:
The48thYoshi wrote:A. What are magnetosomes?
B. What kind of organisms have these organelles?
C. What is their function?

I only briefly read this a long time ago, but here goes nothing:
Answer?
A. A type of plastid (multi-membraned organelle resulting from endosymbiosis) that can detect magnetic fields.
B. This is where I'm not sure. Bacteria, I think. Is it a type of bacteria that metabolically certain metals?
C. They detect magnetic fields and allow the cells that contain them to orient around these magnetic fields in search of some sort of nutrient.


Good Try! I was looking for
A. Plastids are only found in eukaryotic organisms. Magnetosomes are just a group of magnetite crystals. (I'm pretty sure this is right, correct me if I'm wrong.
B. correct. They are magnetotactic bacteria.
C. Correct. They help the magnetotactic bacteria orient along the Earth's magnetic field lines in magnetotaxis. They help the bacteria find an ideal microaerophilic environment


Your turn!
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby Alex-RCHS » September 10th, 2017, 2:43 pm

Chloroplasts are widely known to facilitate photosynethesis in plants. Name two other distinct functions that chloroplasts perform.
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby The48thYoshi » September 10th, 2017, 8:52 pm

Alex-RCHS wrote:Chloroplasts are widely known to facilitate photosynethesis in plants. Name two other distinct functions that chloroplasts perform.


Answer
Fatty Acid synthesis, immune response, and amino acid synthesis
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby JonB » September 22nd, 2017, 10:34 am

I thought I would post a question in here because I love this event. I used this question as a tie-breaker last year on a Microbe Mission exam. Enjoy!

What type (genus, species, subtype) of bacteria is shown here and what is it doing?

Image

Image credit: https://www.sciencedaily.com/images/200 ... 00x600.jpg

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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby whythelongface » September 22nd, 2017, 5:21 pm

Random guess
It looks like some bacteria, no idea what kind, is performing binary fission, but that's probably not it.
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EMORY UNIVERSITY '22
SONT 2017 5th Place Medalist [Microbe Mission]

"One little Sciolyer left all alone,
He went out and hanged himself and then there were none."

Congratulations to WW-P South for winning 14th place at Nationals!

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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby Nano1llus10n » September 22nd, 2017, 8:57 pm

1. It looks like bacteria from the Genus Salmonella, not too sure about species and subtype. 2. It might be infecting the host.
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby JonB » September 23rd, 2017, 8:23 am

whythelongface wrote:
Random guess
It looks like some bacteria, no idea what kind, is performing binary fission, but that's probably not it.


It is bacteria. It is not actively performing fission. Good guess though!

Nano1llus10n wrote:1. It looks like bacteria from the Genus Salmonella, not too sure about species and subtype. 2. It might be infecting the host.



Good analysis but incorrect genus. The genus is commonly know- but not Salmonella. I will tell you that it is infecting the host but the structure that it is forming is indicative to what genus/species it is and what it's doing.

Here is a hint. Although this image is not from the kidney, a severe infection of this can cause kidney damage/failure.


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