Page 17 of 23

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: December 3rd, 2017, 7:59 pm
by The48thYoshi
1. Describe the action of lysozyme on a bacterial cell.
2. How do molecules access a gram-negative bacterial cell through the layers of the membrane?
3. What is LPS, and what role does it play in the body's immune response?
4. Explain the difference between an endo- and exotoxin.
5. Name two major components of gram-positive walls, excluding peptidoglycan.
6. What two molecules is peptidoglycan composed of?
7. Why do bacteria produce antibiotics?
8. Penicillins, cephalosporins, and chloramphenicols are beta-lactam antibiotics. Describe their action.
9. What does "wide spectrum" mean in the context of antibiotics?
1. Lysozyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of a linkage between two components of peptidoglycan (NAM and NAG) 
2. This one I’m not too sure about. I think its through a self-promoted access pathway
3. LPS stands for Lipopolysaccharide. There is a polymer called the O antigen and is exposed in the very outer surface if the bacterial cell, and thus is a target for host antibody recognition.
4.  Exotoxins are toxic substances that are secreted and released outside of a bacterial cell. Endotoxins are consisted of lipids and are located within a bacterial cell. 
5. Techoic acids and proteins? Not sure about the proteins part.
6.  NAM and NAG. No clue what NAM was again. NAG is N-Acetylglucosamine.
7.  They give the bacteria a competitive advantage for food, water, and other limited resources by killing off the competitors.
8. They inhibit cell wall synthesis in bacterial cells.
9. It means that it can act upon a variety of diseases caused by a variety of bacteria successfully.
I had this typed out but forgot to submit it so I had to redo it :/. Hopefully it’s not all wrong :)

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: December 4th, 2017, 2:59 pm
by whythelongface
1. Describe the action of lysozyme on a bacterial cell.
2. How do molecules access a gram-negative bacterial cell through the layers of the membrane?
3. What is LPS, and what role does it play in the body's immune response?
4. Explain the difference between an endo- and exotoxin.
5. Name two major components of gram-positive walls, excluding peptidoglycan.
6. What two molecules is peptidoglycan composed of?
7. Why do bacteria produce antibiotics?
8. Penicillins, cephalosporins, and chloramphenicols are beta-lactam antibiotics. Describe their action.
9. What does "wide spectrum" mean in the context of antibiotics?
1. Lysozyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of a linkage between two components of peptidoglycan (NAM and NAG) 
2. This one I’m not too sure about. I think its through a self-promoted access pathway
3. LPS stands for Lipopolysaccharide. There is a polymer called the O antigen and is exposed in the very outer surface if the bacterial cell, and thus is a target for host antibody recognition.
4.  Exotoxins are toxic substances that are secreted and released outside of a bacterial cell. Endotoxins are consisted of lipids and are located within a bacterial cell. 
5. Techoic acids and proteins? Not sure about the proteins part.
6.  NAM and NAG. No clue what NAM was again. NAG is N-Acetylglucosamine.
7.  They give the bacteria a competitive advantage for food, water, and other limited resources by killing off the competitors.
8. They inhibit cell wall synthesis in bacterial cells.
9. It means that it can act upon a variety of diseases caused by a variety of bacteria successfully.
I had this typed out but forgot to submit it so I had to redo it :/. Hopefully it’s not all wrong :)
Essentially all correct. For 2. I was just looking for porin channels.. I actually don't remember what I wanted for 5), but I think TA is acceptable. NAM stands for n-acetylmuramic acid. I'll find #5 in my notes somewhere. Your turn!

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: December 4th, 2017, 4:20 pm
by The48thYoshi
Explain the syntrophic model and provide 4 pieces of evidence to support it

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: January 3rd, 2018, 2:24 pm
by Pettywap
Explain the syntrophic model and provide 4 pieces of evidence to support it
Syntrophic model- relationship between the archaea and bacteria created the nucleus-containing eukaryotic cell
1. originated when ancient archaea invaded and lived within bacteria eventually forming the early nucleus
Not really sure about the other pieces of evidence or my answer in general :/

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: January 3rd, 2018, 5:37 pm
by whythelongface
Explain the syntrophic model and provide 4 pieces of evidence to support it
Syntrophic model- relationship between the archaea and bacteria created the nucleus-containing eukaryotic cell
1. originated when ancient archaea invaded and lived within bacteria eventually forming the early nucleus
Not really sure about the other pieces of evidence or my answer in general :/
Wasn't there some sort of bacterium where they discovered infolding in the membrane similar to a primitive ER or something?

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: January 9th, 2018, 8:00 am
by The48thYoshi
Explain the syntrophic model and provide 4 pieces of evidence to support it
Syntrophic model- relationship between the archaea and bacteria created the nucleus-containing eukaryotic cell
1. originated when ancient archaea invaded and lived within bacteria eventually forming the early nucleus
Not really sure about the other pieces of evidence or my answer in general :/
Wasn't there some sort of bacterium where they discovered infolding in the membrane similar to a primitive ER or something?
Sorry I haven’t been very active lately.
The syntrophic model proposes that ancient archaea similar to methanogens formed a symbiotic relationship, invading myxobacteria, forming the early nucleus. Some evidence is that archaea and eukarya have similar genes for certain proteins, including histones. In addition, myxobacteria are motile. They can also form multicellular complexes.  Myxobacteria also have kinases and G proteins similar to eukarya.
Your turn

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: January 10th, 2018, 7:06 am
by Tailsfan101
Give the scientific name and a list of symptoms for Legionnaire's Disease.

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: January 14th, 2018, 6:16 am
by themightyweeaboo
Give the scientific name and a list of symptoms for Legionnaire's Disease.
Scientific name: Legionella Pneumophila
Symptoms: Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: January 14th, 2018, 8:13 am
by Tailsfan101
Give the scientific name and a list of symptoms for Legionnaire's Disease.
Scientific name: Legionella Pneumophila
Symptoms: Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea
What I have: Scientific Name: Legionella Bacteria
Symptoms: chest/muscle pain, diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, fever, chills, coughing, shortness of breath, headache

Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Posted: January 14th, 2018, 8:59 am
by themightyweeaboo
Give the scientific name and a list of symptoms for Legionnaire's Disease.
Scientific name: Legionella Pneumophila
Symptoms: Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea
What I have: Scientific Name: Legionella Bacteria
Symptoms: chest/muscle pain, diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, fever, chills, coughing, shortness of breath, headache
About that... Hmm... I guess legionella bacteria would work, I was just being a bit specific. I should have listed more symptoms too, sorry Anyways, another question!

1: Define sanitization, sterilization, and disinfection
2: Name the pros and cons of using each