Herpetology B/C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
Froggie
Member
Member
Posts: 302
Joined: June 19th, 2017, 2:12 pm
Division: B
State: PA
Location: See above.

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Froggie » January 9th, 2018, 4:54 pm

Yeah all correct, your turn. :)
"A lot of people have quotes in their signature. Maybe I should have a quote in my signature. "
- Froggie

User avatar
vehicleguy
Member
Member
Posts: 111
Joined: April 7th, 2017, 4:13 pm
Division: C
Location: Abington Heights High School

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby vehicleguy » January 14th, 2018, 10:18 am

Image
1. Common name and genus
2. Is this turtle a carnivore, herbivore, or omnivore?
3. In what months do these turtles breed in?
4. What animals feed on these turtles' eggs?
5. Bonus: What are some human activities that make this turtle endangered?

Sorry, forgot to post :P
2020- Exp D-Gravity Vehicle-Ornithology-PPP-Wright Stuff
2019- Battery Buggy-ELG-Exp D-Herp-Potions-Roller Coaster
Feel free to PM me about any of my events.
Userpage- https://scioly.org/wiki/index.php/User:Vehicleguy

dvegadvol
Member
Member
Posts: 61
Joined: December 18th, 2015, 3:03 pm

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby dvegadvol » January 15th, 2018, 5:27 pm

I do appreciate the effort, but this specific Trionychidae, Pelochelys cantorii, is endemic only to Southeast Asia.

My understanding is that we are to study reptiles and amphibians from the US or North America.

Also, we aren't required to know common names, unless I'm mistaken, again...

This event has problems of it's own; a large number of Families and Genera are extremely out-dated or conflicted]; some haven't been used since the early 1980s.

Look at the order on the National List - it's directly drawn from the 1979 Edition of the National Audubon Society Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians. That appears to be a bit lazy, or maybe it was simply drawn from the last time SO had this event.

We only have to look to the U of Ga invitational to see how messed up this competition can get. 14 stations at that competition, 11 out of 14 stations were completely foreign species, 1 was introduced to the US, and 2 were native to North America. Well-crafted test and questions, but on subjects no one was prepared for. I can't imagine how frustrating that must have been for the participants.

This should have been constructed around certain genera with limited numbers of species within them - pretty easy to do.

There's a real "slapped together at the last moment feel" to the present competition, imho...

User avatar
Unome
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 4131
Joined: January 26th, 2014, 12:48 pm
Division: Grad
State: GA
Location: somewhere in the sciolyverse

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Unome » January 15th, 2018, 5:43 pm

I do appreciate the effort, but this specific Trionychidae, Pelochelys cantorii, is endemic only to Southeast Asia.

My understanding is that we are to study reptiles and amphibians from the US or North America.

Also, we aren't required to know common names, unless I'm mistaken, again...

This event has problems of it's own; a large number of Families and Genera are extremely out-dated or conflicted]; some haven't been used since the early 1980s.

Look at the order on the National List - it's directly drawn from the 1979 Edition of the National Audubon Society Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians. That appears to be a bit lazy, or maybe it was simply drawn from the last time SO had this event.

We only have to look to the U of Ga invitational to see how messed up this competition can get. 14 stations at that competition, 11 out of 14 stations were completely foreign species, 1 was introduced to the US, and 2 were native to North America. Well-crafted test and questions, but on subjects no one was prepared for. I can't imagine how frustrating that must have been for the participants.

This should have been constructed around certain genera with limited numbers of species within them - pretty easy to do.

There's a real "slapped together at the last moment feel" to the present competition, imho...
To be fair, UGA is not a great representation of the event. UGA tests are perennially poorly written.

There's nothing in particular that restricts the event to US/North America, though I would agree that those are worth focusing on more when studying.

3.f implies that questions asking for common names can be given.

Taxonomic problems are eternal in SO. I expect there's probably some underlying difficulty in getting a good taxonomy, but there are definitely problems with the current list's taxonomy.
Userpage
Chattahoochee High School Class of 2018
Georgia Tech Class of 2022

Opinions expressed on this site are not official; the only place for official rules changes and FAQs is soinc.org.

ScottMaurer19
Member
Member
Posts: 588
Joined: January 5th, 2017, 9:39 am
Division: Grad
State: OH
Location: Solon, OH

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby ScottMaurer19 » January 15th, 2018, 6:31 pm

I do appreciate the effort, but this specific Trionychidae, Pelochelys cantorii, is endemic only to Southeast Asia.

My understanding is that we are to study reptiles and amphibians from the US or North America.

Also, we aren't required to know common names, unless I'm mistaken, again...

This event has problems of it's own; a large number of Families and Genera are extremely out-dated or conflicted]; some haven't been used since the early 1980s.

Look at the order on the National List - it's directly drawn from the 1979 Edition of the National Audubon Society Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians. That appears to be a bit lazy, or maybe it was simply drawn from the last time SO had this event.

We only have to look to the U of Ga invitational to see how messed up this competition can get. 14 stations at that competition, 11 out of 14 stations were completely foreign species, 1 was introduced to the US, and 2 were native to North America. Well-crafted test and questions, but on subjects no one was prepared for. I can't imagine how frustrating that must have been for the participants.

This should have been constructed around certain genera with limited numbers of species within them - pretty easy to do.

There's a real "slapped together at the last moment feel" to the present competition, imho...
To be fair, UGA is not a great representation of the event. UGA tests are perennially poorly written.

There's nothing in particular that restricts the event to US/North America, though I would agree that those are worth focusing on more when studying.

3.f implies that questions asking for common names can be given.

Taxonomic problems are eternal in SO. I expect there's probably some underlying difficulty in getting a good taxonomy, but there are definitely problems with the current list's taxonomy.
I'm guessing he meant common name based on the National SO list which would be soft shelled turtle and not the species common name unless I am mistaken. As Unome said, there is nothing in the rules stating that the specimens must be those native to NA/USA but I submitted an FAQ asking this about two months ago to clarify and have received no response.

So, this picture of (and questions about) the living pancake is fairgame at the moment.
Solon '19 Captain, CWRU '23
2017 (r/s/n):
Hydro: 3/5/18
Robot Arm: na/1/1
Rocks: 1/1/1

2018 (r/s/n):
Heli: 2/1/7 
Herp: 1/4/4
Mission: 1/1/6
Rocks: 1/1/1
Eco: 6/3/9

2019 (r/s/n):
Fossils: 1/1/1
GLM: 1/1/1
Herp: 1/1/5
Mission: 1/1/3
WS: 4/1/10

Top 3 Medals: 144
Golds: 80

dvegadvol
Member
Member
Posts: 61
Joined: December 18th, 2015, 3:03 pm

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby dvegadvol » January 16th, 2018, 8:56 am

If indeed we can read the rules as allowing any herp, that's definitive proof that this thing was put together without any thought.

For example, there are more than 1,500 species of skinks in at least 87 genera worldwide...

In the US there are 15 species in three genera.

I find it hard to believe that the event writers would expect 5th-12th grade students to be able to identify any one of 1,500+ skinks by common name.

While I agree that in the loosest possible interpretation of the rules you could be asked to identify some obscure skink from Papua New Guinea, it just wouldn't be a prudent or reasonable measure of knowledge...

And why would the SO Herpetology Training handout suggest only these two books as reference?

Peterson Field Guides: A Field Guide to Reptiles & Amphibians: Eastern and Central North
America, 4th Edition by Roger Conant and Joseph T. Collins (2016)
and
A Field Guide to Western Reptiles and Amphibians, 3rd Edition by Robert C Stebbins (2003)

They're both only specific to North America.

If it's a worldwide test winners will be crowned completely at random.

User avatar
Unome
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 4131
Joined: January 26th, 2014, 12:48 pm
Division: Grad
State: GA
Location: somewhere in the sciolyverse

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Unome » January 16th, 2018, 9:29 am

If indeed we can read the rules as allowing any herp, that's definitive proof that this thing was put together without any thought.

For example, there are more than 1,500 species of skinks in at least 87 genera worldwide...

In the US there are 15 species in three genera.

I find it hard to believe that the event writers would expect 5th-12th grade students to be able to identify any one of 1,500+ skinks by common name.

While I agree that in the loosest possible interpretation of the rules you could be asked to identify some obscure skink from Papua New Guinea, it just wouldn't be a prudent or reasonable measure of knowledge...

And why would the SO Herpetology Training handout suggest only these two books as reference?

Peterson Field Guides: A Field Guide to Reptiles & Amphibians: Eastern and Central North
America, 4th Edition by Roger Conant and Joseph T. Collins (2016)
and
A Field Guide to Western Reptiles and Amphibians, 3rd Edition by Robert C Stebbins (2003)

They're both only specific to North America.

If it's a worldwide test winners will be crowned completely at random.
As the rules are written, identification should only be asked to the level listed on the official list (rule 3.d). Per the rules, an image of a skink can be of any species of skink in the world, but identification of the image can only ask about either the specific genus Eumeces or the family Scincidae as a whole.
Userpage
Chattahoochee High School Class of 2018
Georgia Tech Class of 2022

Opinions expressed on this site are not official; the only place for official rules changes and FAQs is soinc.org.

Froggie
Member
Member
Posts: 302
Joined: June 19th, 2017, 2:12 pm
Division: B
State: PA
Location: See above.

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Froggie » January 16th, 2018, 10:33 am

If indeed we can read the rules as allowing any herp, that's definitive proof that this thing was put together without any thought.

For example, there are more than 1,500 species of skinks in at least 87 genera worldwide...

In the US there are 15 species in three genera.

I find it hard to believe that the event writers would expect 5th-12th grade students to be able to identify any one of 1,500+ skinks by common name.

While I agree that in the loosest possible interpretation of the rules you could be asked to identify some obscure skink from Papua New Guinea, it just wouldn't be a prudent or reasonable measure of knowledge...

And why would the SO Herpetology Training handout suggest only these two books as reference?

Peterson Field Guides: A Field Guide to Reptiles & Amphibians: Eastern and Central North
America, 4th Edition by Roger Conant and Joseph T. Collins (2016)
and
A Field Guide to Western Reptiles and Amphibians, 3rd Edition by Robert C Stebbins (2003)

They're both only specific to North America.

If it's a worldwide test winners will be crowned completely at random.
As the rules are written, identification should only be asked to the level listed on the official list (rule 3.d). Per the rules, an image of a skink can be of any species of skink in the world, but identification of the image can only ask about either the specific genus Eumeces or the family Scincidae as a whole.
Adding on to what Unome said, if they ask for the common name, you can just say “Skink” and not “Blue Tailed Skink”.
"A lot of people have quotes in their signature. Maybe I should have a quote in my signature. "
- Froggie

User avatar
Kyanite
Member
Member
Posts: 202
Joined: November 6th, 2017, 8:43 am
Division: Grad
State: WA
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Kyanite » January 17th, 2018, 9:32 am

If indeed we can read the rules as allowing any herp, that's definitive proof that this thing was put together without any thought.

For example, there are more than 1,500 species of skinks in at least 87 genera worldwide...

In the US there are 15 species in three genera.

I find it hard to believe that the event writers would expect 5th-12th grade students to be able to identify any one of 1,500+ skinks by common name.

While I agree that in the loosest possible interpretation of the rules you could be asked to identify some obscure skink from Papua New Guinea, it just wouldn't be a prudent or reasonable measure of knowledge...

And why would the SO Herpetology Training handout suggest only these two books as reference?

Peterson Field Guides: A Field Guide to Reptiles & Amphibians: Eastern and Central North
America, 4th Edition by Roger Conant and Joseph T. Collins (2016)
and
A Field Guide to Western Reptiles and Amphibians, 3rd Edition by Robert C Stebbins (2003)

They're both only specific to North America.

If it's a worldwide test winners will be crowned completely at random.
You also have to remember the proctors are not out to get you. They will not go out and choose a specimen they themselves can not identify, that would just be simply cruel and also risky since it could be one not even on the list. Because of this they will often go to the same sources and use the same photos that we all have access to on the internet to make their tests. If you feel they will be testing on worldwide specimens go ahead and prepare for that.

User avatar
Kyanite
Member
Member
Posts: 202
Joined: November 6th, 2017, 8:43 am
Division: Grad
State: WA
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Kyanite » January 17th, 2018, 9:40 am

Image

What is the family shown?

What Toxin do they possess?

What physical change occurs on the epidermal layer of males during breeding season?


Return to “2018 Question Marathons”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests