Rocks and Minerals B/C

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Polarrr
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby Polarrr » February 14th, 2018, 7:36 pm

Question
[img]https://78.media.tumblr.com/104c2912cee1f98197288b0d45a248d2/tumblr_n5sxskqRSr1sicokvo1_500.jpg[/img] 1. Identify this mineral 2. What may this mineral do if it is heated intensely? 3. How does this mineral react with HCl? 4. What is the main place of formation for this mineral? 5. What are some of the common uses for this mineral? 6. For the crystal system this mineral is in, if a specimen displays 1 2-fold axis of symmetry, how many mirror planes must it have?

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kate!
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby kate! » February 21st, 2018, 9:36 am

Question
[img]https://78.media.tumblr.com/104c2912cee1f98197288b0d45a248d2/tumblr_n5sxskqRSr1sicokvo1_500.jpg[/img] 1. Identify this mineral 2. What may this mineral do if it is heated intensely? 3. How does this mineral react with HCl? 4. What is the main place of formation for this mineral? 5. What are some of the common uses for this mineral? 6. For the crystal system this mineral is in, if a specimen displays 1 2-fold axis of symmetry, how many mirror planes must it have?
EDIT: well... my original answer was wrong (thought it was beryl), yikes, am I allowed to try again since I reverse-searched the image??sorry
New Answers
1. Barite 2. It turns yellow/orange 3. It does not react 4. It mostly forms in sedimentary rock layers, but also can replace other minerals 5. Drilling mud; high-density filler for paper, rubber, plastics. Can be used as pigment, x-ray shielding. 6. So, I don't really know what this means but the crystal system is orthorhombic
Last year I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Now I know stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
I'm planning to learn stuff about oceanography, fossils, and more water, yay for the third time!

Polarrr
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby Polarrr » February 21st, 2018, 6:04 pm

Question
[img]https://78.media.tumblr.com/104c2912cee1f98197288b0d45a248d2/tumblr_n5sxskqRSr1sicokvo1_500.jpg[/img] 1. Identify this mineral 2. What may this mineral do if it is heated intensely? 3. How does this mineral react with HCl? 4. What is the main place of formation for this mineral? 5. What are some of the common uses for this mineral? 6. For the crystal system this mineral is in, if a specimen displays 1 2-fold axis of symmetry, how many mirror planes must it have?
EDIT: well... my original answer was wrong (thought it was beryl), yikes, am I allowed to try again since I reverse-searched the image??sorry
New Answers
1. Barite 2. It turns yellow/orange 3. It does not react 4. It mostly forms in sedimentary rock layers, but also can replace other minerals 5. Drilling mud; high-density filler for paper, rubber, plastics. Can be used as pigment, x-ray shielding. 6. So, I don't really know what this means but the crystal system is orthorhombic
Correct for #1, 2, 3, 5. For #4, definitely in sedimentary rock layers, but was also looking for hydrothermal veins. #6 would be that the specimen would have 2 mirror planes. The required symmetry basically depends on the crystal system which you knew was orthorhombic. It's just the symmetry for that specific system.

Your turn.

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kate!
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby kate! » February 22nd, 2018, 5:52 am

New Questions!
[img]https://img.etsystatic.com/il/4b3e3b/815572218/il_fullxfull.815572218_h7mj.jpg[/img] 1. Identify this mineral. 2. What happens to some specimens when they are exposed to air? 3. What is another name for rhodonite? 4. What are some of its uses? 5. What is the origin of its name?
Last year I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Now I know stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
I'm planning to learn stuff about oceanography, fossils, and more water, yay for the third time!

pb5754[]
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby pb5754[] » February 22nd, 2018, 12:32 pm

New Questions!
[img]https://img.etsystatic.com/il/4b3e3b/815572218/il_fullxfull.815572218_h7mj.jpg[/img] 1. Identify this mineral. 2. What happens to some specimens when they are exposed to air? 3. What is another name for rhodonite? 4. What are some of its uses? 5. What is the origin of its name?
Answers
1. Rhodonite 2. They tarnish black or brown. 3. :?: 4. Gemstones, Ornaments, Manganese Ore 5.The Greek word [i]Rhodos[/i], meaning rose-colored.
Although I was able to ID this almost immediately, question #3 gives away the answer. :P

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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby Polarrr » February 22nd, 2018, 12:40 pm

New Questions!
[img]https://img.etsystatic.com/il/4b3e3b/815572218/il_fullxfull.815572218_h7mj.jpg[/img] 1. Identify this mineral. 2. What happens to some specimens when they are exposed to air? 3. What is another name for rhodonite? 4. What are some of its uses? 5. What is the origin of its name?
Answers:
1. Rhodonite 2. It can tarnish black or brown 3. Manganese spar or manganolite 4. Ornamental stone, tumbled stones, ore of manganese. 5. From Greek word Rhodes, meaning rosy.

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kate!
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby kate! » February 22nd, 2018, 12:57 pm

Yikes! Sorry for giving away the answer by accident, but you were both correct, so I guess first come first serve for the next question?
Last year I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Now I know stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
I'm planning to learn stuff about oceanography, fossils, and more water, yay for the third time!

pb5754[]
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby pb5754[] » February 22nd, 2018, 3:37 pm

Question
[img]https://goo.gl/SZiq7q[/img] 1. What is this mineral? 2. What is its environment of formation? 3. Give two substances in which this mineral effervesces or is soluble in. 4. Give another name for this mineral and the locality after which it is named. 5. Give one variety of this mineral. 6. What is the tenacity of this mineral?

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dxu46
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby dxu46 » February 22nd, 2018, 3:49 pm

Question
[img]https://goo.gl/SZiq7q[/img] 1. What is this mineral? 2. What is its environment of formation? 3. Give two substances in which this mineral effervesces or is soluble in. 4. Give another name for this mineral and the locality after which it is named. 5. Give one variety of this mineral. 6. What is the tenacity of this mineral?
Answers
1. Azurite 2. As a secondary mineral in the oxidation zone of copper deposits (copied from my binder which is from minerals.net) 3. HCl, NH3 4. Chessylite, Chessy-les-Mines, France 5. Azuremalachite 6. Brittle. (most are)

pb5754[]
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby pb5754[] » February 22nd, 2018, 5:31 pm

Question
[img]https://goo.gl/SZiq7q[/img] 1. What is this mineral? 2. What is its environment of formation? 3. Give two substances in which this mineral effervesces or is soluble in. 4. Give another name for this mineral and the locality after which it is named. 5. Give one variety of this mineral. 6. What is the tenacity of this mineral?
Answers
1. Azurite 2. As a secondary mineral in the oxidation zone of copper deposits (copied from my binder which is from minerals.net) 3. HCl, NH3 4. Chessylite, Chessy-les-Mines, France 5. Azuremalachite 6. Brittle. (most are)
Correct! Your turn.

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dxu46
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby dxu46 » February 24th, 2018, 11:01 am

General Knowledge Questions
1. What does "vitreous" mean when used for describing a mineral's luster? 2. Is Ice considered a mineral? Why or why not? 3. Name two examples of volcanic glass. 4. List three common cements. How might each be identified in a sedimentary rock? 5. About how many times harder is Fluorite (4) than Talc (1)? 6. What does it mean if a mineral has no cleavage? 7. What does plagioclase feldspar being on the continuous side of the Bowen's Reaction Series mean?

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kate!
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby kate! » February 24th, 2018, 12:48 pm

General Knowledge Questions
1. What does "vitreous" mean when used for describing a mineral's luster? 2. Is Ice considered a mineral? Why or why not? 3. Name two examples of volcanic glass. 4. List three common cements. How might each be identified in a sedimentary rock? 5. About how many times harder is Fluorite (4) than Talc (1)? 6. What does it mean if a mineral has no cleavage? 7. What does plagioclase feldspar being on the continuous side of the Bowen's Reaction Series mean?
Answers
1. A vitreous luster means the mineral is glassy. 2. Ice is a mineral because it has a legitimate chemical formula and crystal structure. 3. Obsidian and pumice. 4. a) calcite, identified by acid test/b) quartz, identified by hardness/c) hematite, identified by color (streak??) 5. Fluorite is about 21 times harder than talc. 6. If a mineral has no cleavage, that means when it is broken, it does not produce any fragments. 7. Plagioclase feldspar being on the continuous side of the Bowen's Reaction Series means that it changes from calcium-rich to sodium-rich at higher and lower temperatures, respectively, rather than changing to a different mineral.(?)
Last year I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Now I know stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
I'm planning to learn stuff about oceanography, fossils, and more water, yay for the third time!

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dxu46
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby dxu46 » February 24th, 2018, 2:47 pm

General Knowledge Questions
1. What does "vitreous" mean when used for describing a mineral's luster? 2. Is Ice considered a mineral? Why or why not? 3. Name two examples of volcanic glass. 4. List three common cements. How might each be identified in a sedimentary rock? 5. About how many times harder is Fluorite (4) than Talc (1)? 6. What does it mean if a mineral has no cleavage? 7. What does plagioclase feldspar being on the continuous side of the Bowen's Reaction Series mean?
Answers
1. A vitreous luster means the mineral is glassy. 2. Ice is a mineral because it has a legitimate chemical formula and crystal structure. 3. Obsidian and pumice. 4. a) calcite, identified by acid test/b) quartz, identified by hardness/c) hematite, identified by color (streak??) 5. Fluorite is about 21 times harder than talc. 6. If a mineral has no cleavage, that means when it is broken, it does not produce any fragments. 7. Plagioclase feldspar being on the continuous side of the Bowen's Reaction Series means that it changes from calcium-rich to sodium-rich at higher and lower temperatures, respectively, rather than changing to a different mineral.(?)
I'll take it, your turn.

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kate!
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby kate! » February 24th, 2018, 3:07 pm

More General Knowledge Because That Was a Good Idea
1. Why are diamond and graphite different minerals if they're both made of carbon? 2. What's the name origin of Aragonite? 3. What is the difference between cleavage and fracture? 4. What type of minerals exhibit hackly fracture? Give 2 examples. 5. Give 3 examples of epigenetic changes and define them.
Last year I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Now I know stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
I'm planning to learn stuff about oceanography, fossils, and more water, yay for the third time!

pb5754[]
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Posts: 381
Joined: March 5th, 2017, 7:49 pm
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Re: Rocks and Minerals B/C

Postby pb5754[] » February 24th, 2018, 4:30 pm

More General Knowledge Because That Was a Good Idea
1. Why are diamond and graphite different minerals if they're both made of carbon? 2. What's the name origin of Aragonite? 3. What is the difference between cleavage and fracture? 4. What type of minerals exhibit hackly fracture? Give 2 examples. 5. Give 3 examples of epigenetic changes and define them.
Answers
1. Diamond and Graphite are different allotropes of carbon. 2. It comes from Molina de Aragon, Spain. 3. Cleavage is the breaking of minerals along planes with weak bonding zones. Fracture is the breaking of minerals without a definite shape. 4. Copper, Silver 5. Not sure....?


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