Experimental Design B/C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
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kate!
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby kate! » March 11th, 2018, 7:52 am

1. Define "operationally defined"
2. Why wouldn't "the color of the floor" or "the humidity level" work as controlled variables?
1. Operationally defined means how the variable works or is set up.
2. A controlled variable has to be something that is part of the materials and the experiment. Those things are outside factors and therefore are not controlled variables.
Two years ago I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Last year I knew stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
Now I'm learning stuff about oceanography, fossils, and writing/following instructions, yay for the third time!

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dxu46
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby dxu46 » March 11th, 2018, 10:04 am

1. Define "operationally defined"
2. Why wouldn't "the color of the floor" or "the humidity level" work as controlled variables?
1. Operationally defined means how the variable works or is set up.
2. A controlled variable has to be something that is part of the materials and the experiment. Those things are outside factors and therefore are not controlled variables.
Correct, your turn.

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby kate! » March 12th, 2018, 11:41 am

1. What should be the last step of your procedure? 
2. What is the difference between qualitative observations and experimental errors?
3. Why should you include standard deviation in the statistics section? Also, why should statistics that are not basic statistics (mean, median, mode, etc.) be included?
Two years ago I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Last year I knew stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
Now I'm learning stuff about oceanography, fossils, and writing/following instructions, yay for the third time!

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby OrigamiPlanet » March 18th, 2018, 9:43 pm

1. What should be the last step of your procedure? 
2. What is the difference between qualitative observations and experimental errors?
3. Why should you include standard deviation in the statistics section? Also, why should statistics that are not basic statistics (mean, median, mode, etc.) be included?
1. Clean up your materials from the experiment.
2. Qualitative observations are notes that one should take account of as data that isn't really expressed as numerical sets of data. Experimental errors are observations that will take effect on quantitative data, and should be considered more towards the accuracy of quantitative data.
3. Standard deviation provides us a basis of how great of a difference there was in the data, so that one can know the average variation between points; knowing this would help to determine data's validity. Other more complicated statistics are also very good for analysis, as they provide insight on accuracy of data, rather than just proving overall trends. For example, the Goodness-of-Fit test ([b]sidenote don't actually try this since it is a bit time consuming[/b]) can prove whether or not there is a significant difference for sure or not by determining the odds every value is equal to the mean. Knowing this then grants us the opportunity to look at trends and whether or not they can actually be taken seriously for consideration.
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Codebusters (3/3); Dynamic Planet (3/1); Astronomy (-/2)

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby kate! » March 19th, 2018, 11:56 am

1. What should be the last step of your procedure? 
2. What is the difference between qualitative observations and experimental errors?
3. Why should you include standard deviation in the statistics section? Also, why should statistics that are not basic statistics (mean, median, mode, etc.) be included?
1. Clean up your materials from the experiment.
2. Qualitative observations are notes that one should take account of as data that isn't really expressed as numerical sets of data. Experimental errors are observations that will take effect on quantitative data, and should be considered more towards the accuracy of quantitative data.
3. Standard deviation provides us a basis of how great of a difference there was in the data, so that one can know the average variation between points; knowing this would help to determine data's validity. Other more complicated statistics are also very good for analysis, as they provide insight on accuracy of data, rather than just proving overall trends. For example, the Goodness-of-Fit test ([b]sidenote don't actually try this since it is a bit time consuming[/b]) can prove whether or not there is a significant difference for sure or not by determining the odds every value is equal to the mean. Knowing this then grants us the opportunity to look at trends and whether or not they can actually be taken seriously for consideration.
Great answers, your turn.
Two years ago I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Last year I knew stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
Now I'm learning stuff about oceanography, fossils, and writing/following instructions, yay for the third time!

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OrigamiPlanet
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby OrigamiPlanet » March 19th, 2018, 12:28 pm

1. If you were given three quartz samples of different colors, a laser beam, a piece of cardstock, a protractor, a mirror and some salt, give a topic that involves optics.
2. Should you use a line graph if the data is about measuring the time it takes for food coloring to diffuse? Why or why not?
3. List an error that could occur when conducting an experiment on Newton's First Law by dropping balls at various heights and the impact may have on data.
Div. C - Cumberland Valley High School

Events: Battle at Valley Forge/MC Barons
Codebusters (3/3); Dynamic Planet (3/1); Astronomy (-/2)

Substitute in Event
Geologic Mapping (-/2)

Email me for anything!

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kate!
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby kate! » March 19th, 2018, 12:42 pm

1. If you were given three quartz samples of different colors, a laser beam, a piece of cardstock, a protractor, a mirror and some salt, give a topic that involves optics.
2. Should you use a line graph if the data is about measuring the time it takes for food coloring to diffuse? Why or why not?
3. List an error that could occur when conducting an experiment on Newton's First Law by dropping balls at various heights and the impact may have on data.
1. Measuring the refractive index of the quartz based on the color. (idk if you want me to elaborate because I know nothing about optics but I know stuff about rocks/minerals)
2. Yes. Time as a dependent variable counts as a quantitative experiment, which you should always use a line graph for since it measures change.
3. When you drop the ball, the force you use is not controlled. This could affect how long the ball stays in motion for.
Two years ago I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Last year I knew stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
Now I'm learning stuff about oceanography, fossils, and writing/following instructions, yay for the third time!

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dxu46
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby dxu46 » March 19th, 2018, 4:10 pm

1. If you were given three quartz samples of different colors, a laser beam, a piece of cardstock, a protractor, a mirror and some salt, give a topic that involves optics.
2. Should you use a line graph if the data is about measuring the time it takes for food coloring to diffuse? Why or why not?
3. List an error that could occur when conducting an experiment on Newton's First Law by dropping balls at various heights and the impact may have on data.
1. Measuring the refractive index of the quartz based on the color. (idk if you want me to elaborate because I know nothing about optics but I know stuff about rocks/minerals)
2. Yes. Time as a dependent variable counts as a quantitative experiment, which you should always use a line graph for since it measures change.
3. When you drop the ball, the force you use is not controlled. This could affect how long the ball stays in motion for.
Just saying I don't think you can measure refractive index easily without a calculator and Snell's Law, maybe instead measure the diameter of the circle of light that the laser beam puts on cardboard through the quartz.

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OrigamiPlanet
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby OrigamiPlanet » March 21st, 2018, 2:18 pm

1. If you were given three quartz samples of different colors, a laser beam, a piece of cardstock, a protractor, a mirror and some salt, give a topic that involves optics.
2. Should you use a line graph if the data is about measuring the time it takes for food coloring to diffuse? Why or why not?
3. List an error that could occur when conducting an experiment on Newton's First Law by dropping balls at various heights and the impact may have on data.
1. Measuring the refractive index of the quartz based on the color. (idk if you want me to elaborate because I know nothing about optics but I know stuff about rocks/minerals)
2. Yes. Time as a dependent variable counts as a quantitative experiment, which you should always use a line graph for since it measures change.
3. When you drop the ball, the force you use is not controlled. This could affect how long the ball stays in motion for.
Just saying I don't think you can measure refractive index easily without a calculator and Snell's Law, maybe instead measure the diameter of the circle of light that the laser beam puts on cardboard through the quartz.
I'd agree with dxu46 for 1., but the other answers are pretty good!
Div. C - Cumberland Valley High School

Events: Battle at Valley Forge/MC Barons
Codebusters (3/3); Dynamic Planet (3/1); Astronomy (-/2)

Substitute in Event
Geologic Mapping (-/2)

Email me for anything!

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kate!
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Postby kate! » March 29th, 2018, 1:08 pm

1. What is the difference between deviations from the procedure and experimental errors?
2. What is the significance of the line of best-fit and in what type of graph is it used?
3. What would be an example of the standard of control in a qualitative experiment?
Two years ago I knew stuff about rocks, minerals, experiments, and ecosystems, yay!
Last year I knew stuff about amphibians, reptiles, water, and more experiments, yay again!
Now I'm learning stuff about oceanography, fossils, and writing/following instructions, yay for the third time!


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