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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Posted: April 23rd, 2018, 7:34 pm
by The48thYoshi
I guess I’ll give some questions?
1. What is the function of steapsin?
2. Where it is produced?
3. What is another name for it?
4. What digestive enzyme is found exclusively in babies?
5. What does it do?
6. What enzyme replaces it with age?
7. What type of cells is it produced by?
1. to break up triacylglycerols into glycerol and fatty acids
2. pancreas
3. triacylglycerol lipase
4. rennin
5. coagulates milk
6. pepsin
7. chief cells
Correct. Your turn

Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Posted: April 23rd, 2018, 8:12 pm
by Nano1llus10n
Name the 9 respiratory volumes/capacities and give a brief description for each

Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Posted: April 24th, 2018, 10:21 am
by Limke
Name the 9 respiratory volumes/capacities and give a brief description for each
There's only 8 on a spirometry graph, so I'm not sure if these are the 9 you were looking for 1. Tidal Volume- air in and out of a normal cycle
2. Inspiratory Reserve - Max air inhaled after normal inhalation
3. Expiratory Reserve- Max air exhaled after normal exhalation
4. Residual Volume- Air left after max exhalation
5. Vital Capacity- Max air breathed out after max inhalation
6. Total Lung Capacity- All the air in the lungs at max inspiration
7. Functional Residual- Volume in lungs after exhalation
8. Inspiratory Capacity- sum of IRV and TV
9. Anatomic Dead Space- air that never reaches the Alveoli

Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Posted: April 24th, 2018, 4:48 pm
by Nano1llus10n
Name the 9 respiratory volumes/capacities and give a brief description for each
There's only 8 on a spirometry graph, so I'm not sure if these are the 9 you were looking for 1. Tidal Volume- air in and out of a normal cycle
2. Inspiratory Reserve - Max air inhaled after normal inhalation
3. Expiratory Reserve- Max air exhaled after normal exhalation
4. Residual Volume- Air left after max exhalation
5. Vital Capacity- Max air breathed out after max inhalation
6. Total Lung Capacity- All the air in the lungs at max inspiration
7. Functional Residual- Volume in lungs after exhalation
8. Inspiratory Capacity- sum of IRV and TV
9. Anatomic Dead Space- air that never reaches the Alveoli
That's correct! Sorry about that, I accidentally counted one of them twice.

Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Posted: April 24th, 2018, 6:46 pm
by Limke
I'll post some questions!

1) What is the FEV1/FVC Ratio? What does it determine?
2) What do the Vagus & Phrenic nerve do?
3) What happens during T Cell selection and why is it necessary?
4) What are the 3 types of Alveolar cells and their functions?
5) What is the difference between professional and non-professional APCs?
6) What are the sacs in the large intestine called? What about the long bands of muscle?
7) How are fats/lipids digested?

Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Posted: May 6th, 2018, 8:11 pm
by Nano1llus10n
I'll post some questions!

1) What is the FEV1/FVC Ratio? What does it determine?
2) What do the Vagus & Phrenic nerve do?
3) What happens during T Cell selection and why is it necessary?
4) What are the 3 types of Alveolar cells and their functions?
5) What is the difference between professional and non-professional APCs?
6) What are the sacs in the large intestine called? What about the long bands of muscle?
7) How are fats/lipids digested?
1. the proportion of the vital capacity that can be forcibly expired in 1 second. Usually for diagnosis between obstructive vs restrictive disorders
2. vagus: parasympathetic control of heart, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract; 
    phrenic: stimulates diaphragm
3. costimulation, is important because w/o, it can lead to anergy, destruction of t cell, or immune tolerance
4. type 1: makes up wall portion of alveoli
    type 2: secretes surfactant
    alveolar macrophage: kills pathogens that enter alveoli
5. professional have MHC 2 while non-professional have MHC 1
6. haustra, teniae coli
7. by lipases