MIT Invitational 2018

Area to advertise for your competitions!
User avatar
WhatScience?
Member
Member
Posts: 394
Joined: July 16th, 2017, 4:03 pm
Division: C
State: NJ

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby WhatScience? » January 21st, 2018, 7:42 pm

Does anyone know if there's any truth to the rumor that MIT is not releasing blank digital copies of the tests to teams this year?
MIT is releasing them, however, they've gone to great lengths to prevent trading.
what are these lengths
"When you clean your room, you are increasing the total chaos of the universe" - Hank Green Crash Course (Entropy)

Events 2018

Thermodynamics, Potions and Poisons, Disease Detectives, Optics, and Towers

User avatar
pikachu4919
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 682
Joined: December 7th, 2012, 2:30 pm
Division: Grad
State: IN
Location: West [Favorite Fightin' Frenchman!]

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby pikachu4919 » January 21st, 2018, 7:45 pm

Does anyone know if there's any truth to the rumor that MIT is not releasing blank digital copies of the tests to teams this year?
MIT is releasing them, however, they've gone to great lengths to prevent trading.
what are these lengths
...I guess you haven’t read any of the most recent posts
Carmel HS (IN) '16
Purdue BiolE '20
Nationals 2016 ~ 4th place Forensics


Not throwin' away my shot!
MY CABBAGES!

pikachu4919's Userpage

Opinions expressed on this site are not official; the only place for official rules changes and FAQs is soinc.org.

Rate my tests!

Private Wang Fire
Member
Member
Posts: 100
Joined: June 1st, 2015, 3:43 pm
Division: Grad
State: OH

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby Private Wang Fire » January 21st, 2018, 7:56 pm

The thing is it must have been schools which attended MIT last year which shared the tests in the past, so did other schools which attended complain or something about other schools getting access to the same resources as them? Because it's not like it really has any impact on the invite itself...
Just speculating here, but I think it's likely the tournament organizers themselves see the tests as possibly the biggest draw to the invitational. As a competitor I definitely think the competition and experience is a major part of the whole invitational experience, but from taking/hearing about the tests and knowing the effort/money going into getting them together, the tournament organizers probably just want to protect what their "product." With that being said, I don't really see registration for MIT dropping anytime in the near future so releasing their tests immediately is probably not going to hurt them (short-term at least) and I'd be a fan of that decision.
MASON HIGH SCHOOL '18

User avatar
pikachu4919
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 682
Joined: December 7th, 2012, 2:30 pm
Division: Grad
State: IN
Location: West [Favorite Fightin' Frenchman!]

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby pikachu4919 » January 21st, 2018, 9:54 pm

Can’t people photoshop out the watermark if they really care?
They could although it would be a ton of work because with 26 events’ worth of documents with each page of every document having the watermark on it, it would sound like a super huge pain to really go through and remove all of them (that R&M answer sheet would particularly be a pain to go through if one really wanted to try to). It would honestly be more beneficial to spend more time actually preparing for competition in other ways instead of spending a ton of time to remove all those watermarks just to trade for another set of tests.

On another note, I’ve kinda been awaiting some spicy event ratings, would anyone like to start?
Carmel HS (IN) '16
Purdue BiolE '20
Nationals 2016 ~ 4th place Forensics


Not throwin' away my shot!
MY CABBAGES!

pikachu4919's Userpage

Opinions expressed on this site are not official; the only place for official rules changes and FAQs is soinc.org.

Rate my tests!

jkang
Member
Member
Posts: 107
Joined: October 17th, 2014, 8:49 pm
Division: Grad
State: TX

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby jkang » January 21st, 2018, 10:55 pm

I think it's unfair that the teams with the most money have access to these resources, and I was really touched by the fact that Princeton became the first to waive invitational registration fees which shows we're slowly taking the steps to make science education more equitable and financially accessible to all.
While this is a valid point, for some tournaments invitational registration fees are very important - I know of several tournaments that would not financially be possible for the organizers without these. While ideally tournaments and the like should be accessible to all without some sort of economic barrier, there definitely still is good reason as running a tournament can cost a lot of money.
UT Austin '19
Liberal Arts and Science Academy '15

User avatar
pikachu4919
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 682
Joined: December 7th, 2012, 2:30 pm
Division: Grad
State: IN
Location: West [Favorite Fightin' Frenchman!]

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby pikachu4919 » January 21st, 2018, 11:17 pm

I think it's unfair that the teams with the most money have access to these resources, and I was really touched by the fact that Princeton became the first to waive invitational registration fees which shows we're slowly taking the steps to make science education more equitable and financially accessible to all.
While this is a valid point, for some tournaments invitational registration fees are very important - I know of several tournaments that would not financially be possible for the organizers without these. While ideally tournaments and the like should be accessible to all without some sort of economic barrier, there definitely still is good reason as running a tournament can cost a lot of money.
Can confirm that tournaments cost a lot - I was the supervisor for Forensics at MIT, and my event had a massive amount of materials that cost around $400 this year. I bet you the material costs could've gone up to $1000 or even above that if we hadn't gotten kinda lucky with certain aspects of obtaining materials (i.e. having stuff from last year thus negating the need to buy it again this year, sales on lab equipment/chemicals, actually having gas outlets in the lab for bunsen burners, etc.). And I can only imagine that there were other individual events that were just as if not more expensive in terms of materials. Additionally, the events themselves aren't the only things that could cost a fortune for some organizers - the possible fees for some of the rooms used, the fees for feeding the volunteers, paying for the use of the Avogadro scoring system, paying for the medals (which, from my experience doing admin stuff for Purdue's Regional Tournament, can go above $1000 for just 1st - 3rd place, let alone to 6th place) and trophies, etc are all expensive. The money to pay for all of those fees has to come from somewhere - it certainly doesn't grow on trees, and it's not like it's necessarily always really easy to get funding.

No spicy event ratings from competitors yet? They certainly will help improve the invitational in the future...
Carmel HS (IN) '16
Purdue BiolE '20
Nationals 2016 ~ 4th place Forensics


Not throwin' away my shot!
MY CABBAGES!

pikachu4919's Userpage

Opinions expressed on this site are not official; the only place for official rules changes and FAQs is soinc.org.

Rate my tests!

syo_astro
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 592
Joined: December 3rd, 2011, 9:45 pm
Division: Grad
State: NY
Contact:

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby syo_astro » January 21st, 2018, 11:32 pm

I think it's unfair that the teams with the most money have access to these resources, and I was really touched by the fact that Princeton became the first to waive invitational registration fees which shows we're slowly taking the steps to make science education more equitable and financially accessible to all.
While this is a valid point, for some tournaments invitational registration fees are very important - I know of several tournaments that would not financially be possible for the organizers without these. While ideally tournaments and the like should be accessible to all without some sort of economic barrier, there definitely still is good reason as running a tournament can cost a lot of money.
Hadn't seen the numbers until running umich's invite. I don't deal with money much, so I won't act like an expert. On the other hand, invites, namely at universities, have a MUCH easier time acquiring funds than many regionals*. It's sort of hard starting off, but after a year or two the university or other organizations would provide support that would make volunteer or funding problems massively easier.

This part don't yell at me over, just being honest in context of university invites and helping teams...not saying no invites boo blah blah:
I'm still unconvinced that invites are better than alternatives (e.g. Using funds to directly help teams, regionals, working towards affect things on state level). Running a tournament may motivate alumni groups, which is good, but invites are extremely resource intensive and umso is preventing me from writing tests for other tournies (regs, states)...I hear invites are done "along with other things". I haven't really been shown that, for example, tons of alumni are more organized, states listen up more, and teams get helped a ton necessarily due to invites. I can argue theoretical pluses and minuses, but that's not really my point.

*There are a lot of regionals. Even if you point to those with an easy time (well-established schools that have all the equipment), there's plenty that have trouble even running events. I can guess at funding sources for materials/lunches, like registration fees, but it can still be tough. Still, university invites, especially recent ones, can readily find funding sources in my experience (though, the first year will obviously always be tough).
Last edited by syo_astro on January 22nd, 2018, 12:03 am, edited 2 times in total.
B: Crave the Wave, Environmental Chemistry, Robo-Cross, Meteorology, Physical Science Lab, Solar System, DyPlan (E and V), Shock Value
C: Microbe Mission, DyPlan (Earth's Fresh Waters), Fermi Questions, GeoMaps, Gravity Vehicle, Scrambler, Rocks, Astronomy
Grad: Writing Tests/Supervising (NY/MI)

User avatar
jackway
Member
Member
Posts: 13
Joined: June 5th, 2017, 7:01 pm
Division: Grad
State: NC

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby jackway » January 21st, 2018, 11:53 pm

MIT was my team's first time attending an invitational. I had a great experience, the tournament was nicely run and the tests that I took were well written (I found the Remote Sensing test even more difficult than the nats test last year) and definitely gave me material to prepare for future tournaments.

Also, proud of my team for performing above expectations at our first invitational!
Enloe '18 | Duke '22

User avatar
EastStroudsburg13
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 3035
Joined: January 17th, 2009, 7:32 am
Division: Grad
State: MD
Location: At work trying to be a real adult
Contact:

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby EastStroudsburg13 » January 22nd, 2018, 4:56 am

This part don't yell at me over, just being honest in context of university invites and helping teams...not saying no invites boo blah blah:
I'm still unconvinced that invites are better than alternatives (e.g. Using funds to directly help teams, regionals, working towards affect things on state level). Running a tournament may motivate alumni groups, which is good, but invites are extremely resource intensive and umso is preventing me from writing tests for other tournies (regs, states)...I hear invites are done "along with other things". I haven't really been shown that, for example, tons of alumni are more organized, states listen up more, and teams get helped a ton necessarily due to invites. I can argue theoretical pluses and minuses, but that's not really my point.
You make a good point here; as of now I haven't really seen university groups really mobilize themselves to help out at regionals and states. Not by hosting their own regionals, but by offering themselves up as volunteers in any way that's possible. If groups just go and help out, it can really build a lasting partnership with state orgs that leads to something more. I know schools want to host tournaments and I'm not necessarily against that, and I know some organizations do mentorship program, but a lot of regionals could use additional help and I'd agree that helping at those official tournaments should be more of a focus.
East Stroudsburg South Class of 2012, Alumnus of JT Lambert, Drexel University Class of 2017

Helpful Links
Wiki
Wiki Pages that Need Work
FAQ and SciOly FAQ Wiki
Chat (See IRC Wiki for more info)
BBCode Wiki


So long, and thanks for all the Future Dictator titles!

JonB
Coach
Coach
Posts: 289
Joined: March 11th, 2014, 12:00 pm
Division: C
State: FL

Re: MIT Invitational 2018

Postby JonB » January 22nd, 2018, 5:29 am

This part don't yell at me over, just being honest in context of university invites and helping teams...not saying no invites boo blah blah:
I'm still unconvinced that invites are better than alternatives (e.g. Using funds to directly help teams, regionals, working towards affect things on state level). Running a tournament may motivate alumni groups, which is good, but invites are extremely resource intensive and umso is preventing me from writing tests for other tournies (regs, states)...I hear invites are done "along with other things". I haven't really been shown that, for example, tons of alumni are more organized, states listen up more, and teams get helped a ton necessarily due to invites. I can argue theoretical pluses and minuses, but that's not really my point.
You make a good point here; as of now I haven't really seen university groups really mobilize themselves to help out at regionals and states. Not by hosting their own regionals, but by offering themselves up as volunteers in any way that's possible. If groups just go and help out, it can really build a lasting partnership with state orgs that leads to something more. I know schools want to host tournaments and I'm not necessarily against that, and I know some organizations do mentorship program, but a lot of regionals could use additional help and I'd agree that helping at those official tournaments should be more of a focus.

The Southeast Florida Regional Championship is held at Florida Atlantic University and both graduate students and full time faculty assist/supervise almost every event. I agree with you though, it is unique and uncommon to have help from a university.


Return to “2018 Invitationals”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest