Circuit Lab B/C

bob23
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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby bob23 » September 25th, 2019, 7:59 pm

Will Maxwell's equations show up on the Division C test?

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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby gz839918 » September 26th, 2019, 5:50 am

Will Maxwell's equations show up on the Division C test?
Since different people write the tests at each competition, it's possible that some test writers will ask you about these things. From experience, they tend not to ask these though, and in the rare cases that Maxwell's equations are used, the questions are usually basic or conceptual (for example, which law states that there are no magnetic monopoles?). It wouldn't hurt to have a one-sentence summary of each law in your binder.
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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby knightmoves » September 26th, 2019, 8:58 am

Will Maxwell's equations show up on the Division C test?
Since different people write the tests at each competition, it's possible that some test writers will ask you about these things. From experience, they tend not to ask these though, and in the rare cases that Maxwell's equations are used, the questions are usually basic or conceptual (for example, which law states that there are no magnetic monopoles?). It wouldn't hurt to have a one-sentence summary of each law in your binder.
Note that rule 3d explicitly excludes calculations involving direct use of differential equations. Maxwell's equations are differential equations; also note that Maxwell, Gauss, Biot, Savart, and their like are not included in 3c(i). The event is Circuit Lab, not Electromagnetism - I don't think your question about monopoles fits within the rules. On the other hand, lots of ES don't keep strictly within the boundaries of the rules, and it's tiresome to go around arbitrating questions all the time.

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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby lindsmaurer » September 26th, 2019, 10:39 am

Will Maxwell's equations show up on the Division C test?
Since different people write the tests at each competition, it's possible that some test writers will ask you about these things. From experience, they tend not to ask these though, and in the rare cases that Maxwell's equations are used, the questions are usually basic or conceptual (for example, which law states that there are no magnetic monopoles?). It wouldn't hurt to have a one-sentence summary of each law in your binder.
Note that rule 3d explicitly excludes calculations involving direct use of differential equations. Maxwell's equations are differential equations; also note that Maxwell, Gauss, Biot, Savart, and their like are not included in 3c(i). The event is Circuit Lab, not Electromagnetism - I don't think your question about monopoles fits within the rules. On the other hand, lots of ES don't keep strictly within the boundaries of the rules, and it's tiresome to go around arbitrating questions all the time.
That's assuming that all tests follow the rules. While tests at regionals, states, and nats can be expected to follow the rules, tests at invites are sometimes written by parents or experts in the field but who have never done scio, who don't always know the rules and don't always check.
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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » September 26th, 2019, 1:40 pm

Will Maxwell's equations show up on the Division C test?
Since different people write the tests at each competition, it's possible that some test writers will ask you about these things. From experience, they tend not to ask these though, and in the rare cases that Maxwell's equations are used, the questions are usually basic or conceptual (for example, which law states that there are no magnetic monopoles?). It wouldn't hurt to have a one-sentence summary of each law in your binder.
Note that rule 3d explicitly excludes calculations involving direct use of differential equations. Maxwell's equations are differential equations; also note that Maxwell, Gauss, Biot, Savart, and their like are not included in 3c(i). The event is Circuit Lab, not Electromagnetism - I don't think your question about monopoles fits within the rules. On the other hand, lots of ES don't keep strictly within the boundaries of the rules, and it's tiresome to go around arbitrating questions all the time.
I would say that the meaning of the equation and simple applications without knowledge of calculus required could be tested, but not anything involving solving differential equations.
While tests at regionals, states, and nats can be expected to follow the rules
Hehe

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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby gz839918 » September 26th, 2019, 2:51 pm

While tests at regionals, states, and nats can be expected to follow the rules
Hehe
lol

to be fair, windu34 will be co-writing the nationals test, so at the very least we'll have a degree of assurance nationals will be good... if only we could have more supervisors like him
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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby windu34 » September 26th, 2019, 7:38 pm

While tests at regionals, states, and nats can be expected to follow the rules
Hehe
lol
to be fair, windu34 will be co-writing the nationals test, so at the very least we'll have a degree of assurance nationals will be good... if only we could have more supervisors like him
I also find it entertaining that there is an expectation for regionals/states and even nationals to follow the rules. Believe it or not, the vast majority of regional/state competitions and nationals dont have a "test review process" where someone is checking tests for quality/rule-following. That said, its still good to expect the ES to follow the ruls when preparing, but dont be too suprised if you see a couple of "off-topic" questions.

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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby TheWood » October 14th, 2019, 2:49 pm

For people who have taken physics C, how much more difficult is this event for division C than the scope of that class?
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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby Nydauron » October 14th, 2019, 3:48 pm

For people who have taken physics C, how much more difficult is this event for division C than the scope of that class?
Well, rule 3.d states there should be no calculus or differential equations in the competition, which is most of what Physics C is based around. Circuit Lab also doesn't cover inductance or inductors, another topic of Physics C. The only thing I think Circuit Lab has that is also in Physics C is finding the current/voltage during the transient period of an RC circuit and finding the root mean squared (RMS) current/voltage. Other than that, Physics 2 covers a majority of the topics. Also, regarding the differences between the divisions, the additional topics relate more to something you would find in a digital electronics class rather than a physics class.
I took Physics C and did Circuit Lab last year, and I can say Physics C was WAY harder than this.
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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby Nba2302 » October 16th, 2019, 4:07 pm

I'm new to circuit lab this year. How do I study, besides the powerpoint and the youtube videos?


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