Herpetology B/C

fabishkf
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby fabishkf » January 13th, 2019, 10:49 am

same clade as crocodiles
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » January 13th, 2019, 1:11 pm

fabishkf wrote:same clade as crocodiles

Reptiles don't include birds though: rather, a reptile is an amniote that is neither a mammal or a bird. This is because reptiles aren't actually a single clade.

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby fabishkf » January 13th, 2019, 2:09 pm

Actually, birds are just not traditionally studied with reptiles because superficially they seem different. Phylogenetically, they are part of the clade Reptilia, which isn't a clade if you don't include birds. So even though they aren't studied together traditionally they are in the same monophyletic group (your definition of reptiles is correct in how they're usually studied however).
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2019 Events: Designer Genes, Fossils, Geologic Mapping, Herpetology

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » January 13th, 2019, 4:32 pm

fabishkf wrote:Actually, birds are just not traditionally studied with reptiles because superficially they seem different. Phylogenetically, they are part of the clade Reptilia, which isn't a clade if you don't include birds. So even though they aren't studied together traditionally they are in the same monophyletic group (your definition of reptiles is correct in how they're usually studied however).

It is true that birds are part of the same clade as reptiles, but Reptilia is not a clade: it is a class. The clade that includes reptiles and birds is generally (read: as far as I know) called Sauropsida. Either way, it doesn't make sense for a bird to be on the Herpetology List because hereptologists don't study birds.

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby kate! » January 13th, 2019, 4:40 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
fabishkf wrote:Actually, birds are just not traditionally studied with reptiles because superficially they seem different. Phylogenetically, they are part of the clade Reptilia, which isn't a clade if you don't include birds. So even though they aren't studied together traditionally they are in the same monophyletic group (your definition of reptiles is correct in how they're usually studied however).

It is true that birds are part of the same clade as reptiles, but Reptilia is not a clade: it is a class. The clade that includes reptiles and birds is generally (read: as far as I know) called Sauropsida. Either way, it doesn't make sense for a bird to be on the Herpetology List because herpetologists don't study birds.

Also, Ornithology is literally an event so why would there be birds in any other event.
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » January 13th, 2019, 4:41 pm

kate! wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
fabishkf wrote:Actually, birds are just not traditionally studied with reptiles because superficially they seem different. Phylogenetically, they are part of the clade Reptilia, which isn't a clade if you don't include birds. So even though they aren't studied together traditionally they are in the same monophyletic group (your definition of reptiles is correct in how they're usually studied however).

It is true that birds are part of the same clade as reptiles, but Reptilia is not a clade: it is a class. The clade that includes reptiles and birds is generally (read: as far as I know) called Sauropsida. Either way, it doesn't make sense for a bird to be on the Herpetology List because herpetologists don't study birds.

Also, Ornithology is literally an event so why would there be birds in any other event.

Yeah, I hope that event supervisor didn't actually use that tiebreaker question...

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby cbrant554 » January 13th, 2019, 5:44 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
kate! wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:It is true that birds are part of the same clade as reptiles, but Reptilia is not a clade: it is a class. The clade that includes reptiles and birds is generally (read: as far as I know) called Sauropsida. Either way, it doesn't make sense for a bird to be on the Herpetology List because herpetologists don't study birds.

Also, Ornithology is literally an event so why would there be birds in any other event.

Yeah, I hope that event supervisor didn't actually use that tiebreaker question...

The Question was a whole separate question from the others and was labeled tiebreaker. The person who wrote the test wasn't a "Official test writer" they just volunteered and had done ecology before. Luckily it was only an invite

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » January 13th, 2019, 5:54 pm

cbrant554 wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
kate! wrote:Also, Ornithology is literally an event so why would there be birds in any other event.

Yeah, I hope that event supervisor didn't actually use that tiebreaker question...

The Question was a whole separate question from the others and was labeled tiebreaker. The person who wrote the test wasn't a "Official test writer" they just volunteered and had done ecology before. Luckily it was only an invite

Haha, props to the test writer for volunteering!

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby anthony » January 16th, 2019, 2:40 pm

:D :( :x :lol: :shock: :? :geek: 8-) :!:
Are we allowed to use a published field guide in the herpetology event? If so, what's the best one?

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby emmalasagna » January 16th, 2019, 4:32 pm

anthony wrote:Are we allowed to use a published field guide in the herpetology event? If so, what's the best one?

As of the new rules for this year, only a student-made binder is allowed for competitions. Field guides can still be useful for gathering information and studying, though (Peterson's field guides are usually recommended), but aren't allowed in competitions.
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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby cbrant554 » January 16th, 2019, 5:24 pm

emmalasagna wrote:
anthony wrote:Are we allowed to use a published field guide in the herpetology event? If so, what's the best one?

As of the new rules for this year, only a student-made binder is allowed for competitions. Field guides can still be useful for gathering information and studying, though (Peterson's field guides are usually recommended), but aren't allowed in competitions.

You could, if you wanted to that badly, just photocopy the field guide and put it in your binder but yea you cant have it by itself

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Almandine2 » January 17th, 2019, 9:50 pm

lol the same stuff gets asked every year here
Herpetology, ALWAYS HERPETOLOGY

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » January 18th, 2019, 8:41 am

Almandine2 wrote:lol the same stuff gets asked every year here

Multiple times every year :P

But that's what we're here for!

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby dish123 » January 26th, 2019, 12:16 pm

We are having a little trouble with fact sheets? Where can we find information? How much do we need? What websites should we use? Do they have to be only for our state for "where they are found" or all of the country?

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Re: Herpetology B/C

Postby Kyanite » January 26th, 2019, 1:35 pm

dish123 wrote:We are having a little trouble with fact sheets? Where can we find information? How much do we need? What websites should we use? Do they have to be only for our state for "where they are found" or all of the country?


You use various sources, ie: Wiki, Field Guides and various websites, here are some links to get you started.
https://scioly.org/wiki/index.php/Herpetology http://www.californiaherps.com/ http://www.michherp.org/miherps.html https://lsa.umich.edu/ummz/herps.html
For another way to find resources go to the specimens wiki page and use the links they had referenced to create the page.

You put down as much information as you feel you need/want, typically in the past I would have included: Name, Characteristics, Pictures, Size, Colors, Reproduction, Feeding habits, Name origin, "Fun facts", anatomical aspects, locations where its found and any relation to people whether its a threat, economic resource or threatened by people. Make sure you know the gist of the information rather then just copying and pasting wiki pages.

You should include every location they are present within the US not just to your state.


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