Dynamic Planet B/C

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LiteralRhinoceros
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby LiteralRhinoceros » April 3rd, 2019, 2:04 pm

if you are just starting, I think the ID portion is the most important, since pretty much every test has that.
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WangwithaTang
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby WangwithaTang » April 3rd, 2019, 3:33 pm

LiteralRhinoceros wrote:if you are just starting, I think the ID portion is the most important, since pretty much every test has that.



Wait what does ID stand for?

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 3rd, 2019, 3:43 pm

WangwithaTang wrote:
LiteralRhinoceros wrote:if you are just starting, I think the ID portion is the most important, since pretty much every test has that.



Wait what does ID stand for?

Identification

pb5754[]
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby pb5754[] » April 3rd, 2019, 3:43 pm

WangwithaTang wrote:
LiteralRhinoceros wrote:if you are just starting, I think the ID portion is the most important, since pretty much every test has that.



Wait what does ID stand for?

Identification (of different types of glacial erosional/depositional features, satellite images, etc.)

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby WangwithaTang » April 3rd, 2019, 7:59 pm

pb5754[] wrote:
WangwithaTang wrote:
LiteralRhinoceros wrote:if you are just starting, I think the ID portion is the most important, since pretty much every test has that.



Wait what does ID stand for?

Identification (of different types of glacial erosional/depositional features, satellite images, etc.)


oh, okay, makes sense.

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby WangwithaTang » April 4th, 2019, 7:18 pm

Can somebody explain the marine isotope and sedimentary layers part of this event? I've been studying this event for a while now, but I still can't find anything on that.

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 4th, 2019, 7:51 pm

WangwithaTang wrote:Can somebody explain the marine isotope and sedimentary layers part of this event? I've been studying this event for a while now, but I still can't find anything on that.

I'll try to lead you along the way.

For the first question, you should look for O-18 and O-16 istopoes and what they indicate about past climate.

For the second question, you should look for information about stratigraphy and laws of stratigraphy (not sure how relevant sedimentary layers are for the topic this year) but also more generally, about sedimentary sequences produced by glaciers: glacial loess, till, how they're deposited, structures made of them, places/environments where they can be found/generated, etc.

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby WangwithaTang » April 5th, 2019, 8:17 am

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
WangwithaTang wrote:Can somebody explain the marine isotope and sedimentary layers part of this event? I've been studying this event for a while now, but I still can't find anything on that.

I'll try to lead you along the way.

For the first question, you should look for O-18 and O-16 istopoes and what they indicate about past climate.

For the second question, you should look for information about stratigraphy and laws of stratigraphy (not sure how relevant sedimentary layers are for the topic this year) but also more generally, about sedimentary sequences produced by glaciers: glacial loess, till, how they're deposited, structures made of them, places/environments where they can be found/generated, etc.


ok. thanks!

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby sciencegirl03 » April 6th, 2019, 9:06 am

Anyone know how to get the answer to Q2?

Q1) An unnamed lake was formed from ice melt. Periodically the ice dam holding back the water would
break, resulting in enormous volumes of water suddenly being released. A typical release might result in
the flow of 10 cubic kilometers of water per hour. At this rate, the lake could be entirely drained in two
days. If the lake covered approximately 800 sq. kilometers, which of the following is closest to the
average depth of the lake. For calculation purposes, assume that the lake had a uniform depth.
Answer: 600 meters (this one is easy)

Q2) If the lake in question 50 were losing water at 10 cubic kilometers per hour, by how much would the
water level in a deep canyon rise if the canyon were 0.5 km across at the bottom and the river was
determined to be moving at 36 m/sec. For calculations, assume the canyon walls are vertical, a true “box”
canyon. Pick the answer that is closest to the calculated amount.
Answer: 100 m?? (how do you get that?)
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 6th, 2019, 9:24 am

sciencegirl03 wrote:Anyone know how to get the answer to Q2?

Q1) An unnamed lake was formed from ice melt. Periodically the ice dam holding back the water would
break, resulting in enormous volumes of water suddenly being released. A typical release might result in
the flow of 10 cubic kilometers of water per hour. At this rate, the lake could be entirely drained in two
days. If the lake covered approximately 800 sq. kilometers, which of the following is closest to the
average depth of the lake. For calculation purposes, assume that the lake had a uniform depth.
Answer: 600 meters (this one is easy)

Q2) If the lake in question 50 were losing water at 10 cubic kilometers per hour, by how much would the
water level in a deep canyon rise if the canyon were 0.5 km across at the bottom and the river was
determined to be moving at 36 m/sec. For calculations, assume the canyon walls are vertical, a true “box”
canyon. Pick the answer that is closest to the calculated amount.
Answer: 100 m?? (how do you get that?)

That's odd, is the original depth of the river given to you?


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