Solar System B

bp31000
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Re: Solar System B

Postby bp31000 » April 7th, 2019, 7:32 pm

Adi1008 wrote:
Killboe wrote:Just scored an 85% on the test. Really well written, thank you for sharing it!

85% would put you right around the top two teams - congrats!

bp31000 wrote:A special thanks to Adi1008 for making the test and posting them for us. had my state competition today. the questions were different, but the format and question type were exactly the same as this test. we did well and got 1st place Yaaaaayyy :D

Nice job on the first place! Getting first at state in an event like Solar System is tough.

I'm glad both of you enjoyed the test and found it useful; I certainly spent a lot of time making it. Good luck at nationals and I hope you enjoy the test there!

no nationals for me, i am done for the year, my school came 6th overall (we are ecstatic about that, its only second year we are competing!)
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Re: Solar System B

Postby Sharan.thiru » April 16th, 2019, 7:30 am

bp31000 wrote:
Adi1008 wrote:
Killboe wrote:Just scored an 85% on the test. Really well written, thank you for sharing it!

85% would put you right around the top two teams - congrats!

bp31000 wrote:A special thanks to Adi1008 for making the test and posting them for us. had my state competition today. the questions were different, but the format and question type were exactly the same as this test. we did well and got 1st place Yaaaaayyy :D

Nice job on the first place! Getting first at state in an event like Solar System is tough.

I'm glad both of you enjoyed the test and found it useful; I certainly spent a lot of time making it. Good luck at nationals and I hope you enjoy the test there!

no nationals for me, i am done for the year, my school came 6th overall (we are ecstatic about that, its only second year we are competing!)

6th place is really good for a team that's only in it for 2 years, especially at states
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Re: Solar System B

Postby Killboe » April 16th, 2019, 4:49 pm

Sharan.thiru wrote:
bp31000 wrote:
Adi1008 wrote:85% would put you right around the top two teams - congrats!


Nice job on the first place! Getting first at state in an event like Solar System is tough.

I'm glad both of you enjoyed the test and found it useful; I certainly spent a lot of time making it. Good luck at nationals and I hope you enjoy the test there!

no nationals for me, i am done for the year, my school came 6th overall (we are ecstatic about that, its only second year we are competing!)

6th place is really good for a team that's only in it for 2 years, especially at states


Agreed. I mean, Jesus, your placements are amazing for your 1st or 2nd year. Props to you for studying hard and I hope you guys make it to nats soon!
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Re: Solar System B

Postby space-egg » April 24th, 2019, 11:45 am

In the rules, it says that we should study rocky bodies in the solar system. That mostly implies the terrestrial planets (and the asteroids/trojans/etc.) Does that also include icy moons, such as the Galilean moons? At invitationals and regionals, there weren't any questions on the rocky moons of the outer planets. But at state, 60% of the test consisted of Jupiter and Saturn's moons. Should I expect this topic to be a big part of the Nationals test?
potions and poisons - solar system

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Re: Solar System B

Postby Killboe » April 24th, 2019, 12:26 pm

space-egg wrote:In the rules, it says that we should study rocky bodies in the solar system. That mostly implies the terrestrial planets (and the asteroids/trojans/etc.) Does that also include icy moons, such as the Galilean moons? At invitationals and regionals, there weren't any questions on the rocky moons of the outer planets. But at state, 60% of the test consisted of Jupiter and Saturn's moons. Should I expect this topic to be a big part of the Nationals test?


No. You are not supposed to be studying ANY of the terrestrial planets. Take a closer look at the rules. That, is what you need to be studying. If 60% of the test was on Jupiter and Saturn's moons, it was a bad test. The only moons that you should be studying are : Mimas, Phoebe, Earth's moon, and Charon.
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space-egg
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Re: Solar System B

Postby space-egg » April 24th, 2019, 12:47 pm

Killboe wrote:
space-egg wrote:In the rules, it says that we should study rocky bodies in the solar system. That mostly implies the terrestrial planets (and the asteroids/trojans/etc.) Does that also include icy moons, such as the Galilean moons? At invitationals and regionals, there weren't any questions on the rocky moons of the outer planets. But at state, 60% of the test consisted of Jupiter and Saturn's moons. Should I expect this topic to be a big part of the Nationals test?


No. You are not supposed to be studying ANY of the terrestrial planets. Take a closer look at the rules. That, is what you need to be studying. If 60% of the test was on Jupiter and Saturn's moons, it was a bad test. The only moons that you should be studying are : Mimas, Phoebe, Earth's moon, and Charon.


This is in the rules: "Participants must be knowledgable about the history and geologic processes involved in the formation and evolution of Earth's moon and other rocky bodies of the solar system."

On every test I have taken, theere have been questions on the inner planets. Usually about their moons, geologic features, and formation. Even on the test exchange, many tests have in depth questions about the terrestrial planets.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby Killboe » April 24th, 2019, 12:53 pm

space-egg wrote:
Killboe wrote:
space-egg wrote:In the rules, it says that we should study rocky bodies in the solar system. That mostly implies the terrestrial planets (and the asteroids/trojans/etc.) Does that also include icy moons, such as the Galilean moons? At invitationals and regionals, there weren't any questions on the rocky moons of the outer planets. But at state, 60% of the test consisted of Jupiter and Saturn's moons. Should I expect this topic to be a big part of the Nationals test?


No. You are not supposed to be studying ANY of the terrestrial planets. Take a closer look at the rules. That, is what you need to be studying. If 60% of the test was on Jupiter and Saturn's moons, it was a bad test. The only moons that you should be studying are : Mimas, Phoebe, Earth's moon, and Charon.


This is in the rules: "Participants must be knowledgable about the history and geologic processes involved in the formation and evolution of Earth's moon and other rocky bodies of the solar system."

On every test I have taken, theere have been questions on the inner planets. Usually about their moons, geologic features, and formation. Even on the test exchange, many tests have in depth questions about the terrestrial planets.


Every test? Really?

Read ALL of the rules.

We do not need to know about Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby EastStroudsburg13 » April 24th, 2019, 1:44 pm

space-egg wrote:
Killboe wrote:
space-egg wrote:In the rules, it says that we should study rocky bodies in the solar system. That mostly implies the terrestrial planets (and the asteroids/trojans/etc.) Does that also include icy moons, such as the Galilean moons? At invitationals and regionals, there weren't any questions on the rocky moons of the outer planets. But at state, 60% of the test consisted of Jupiter and Saturn's moons. Should I expect this topic to be a big part of the Nationals test?


No. You are not supposed to be studying ANY of the terrestrial planets. Take a closer look at the rules. That, is what you need to be studying. If 60% of the test was on Jupiter and Saturn's moons, it was a bad test. The only moons that you should be studying are : Mimas, Phoebe, Earth's moon, and Charon.


This is in the rules: "Participants must be knowledgable about the history and geologic processes involved in the formation and evolution of Earth's moon and other rocky bodies of the solar system."

On every test I have taken, theere have been questions on the inner planets. Usually about their moons, geologic features, and formation. Even on the test exchange, many tests have in depth questions about the terrestrial planets.

Several of the tests on the test exchange are from past years, when inner planets were part of the rules. In addition, I suspect some supervisors are not aware of all of the rules changes, and have been including questions about bodies that are not laid out in the rules.

However, for nationals, you should expect that the test will follow the rules. Thus, you should expect no questions on terrestrial planets, aside from questions about the Earth relating to eclipses, tides, etc.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby space-egg » April 25th, 2019, 6:03 am

EastStroudsburg13 wrote:
space-egg wrote:
Killboe wrote:
No. You are not supposed to be studying ANY of the terrestrial planets. Take a closer look at the rules. That, is what you need to be studying. If 60% of the test was on Jupiter and Saturn's moons, it was a bad test. The only moons that you should be studying are : Mimas, Phoebe, Earth's moon, and Charon.


This is in the rules: "Participants must be knowledgable about the history and geologic processes involved in the formation and evolution of Earth's moon and other rocky bodies of the solar system."

On every test I have taken, theere have been questions on the inner planets. Usually about their moons, geologic features, and formation. Even on the test exchange, many tests have in depth questions about the terrestrial planets.

Several of the tests on the test exchange are from past years, when inner planets were part of the rules. In addition, I suspect some supervisors are not aware of all of the rules changes, and have been including questions about bodies that are not laid out in the rules.

However, for nationals, you should expect that the test will follow the rules. Thus, you should expect no questions on terrestrial planets, aside from questions about the Earth relating to eclipses, tides, etc.


Alright, I reread the rules and that makes sense. Thanks for your help.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby bp31000 » May 1st, 2019, 7:42 am

space-egg wrote:
Killboe wrote:
space-egg wrote:In the rules, it says that we should study rocky bodies in the solar system. That mostly implies the terrestrial planets (and the asteroids/trojans/etc.) Does that also include icy moons, such as the Galilean moons? At invitationals and regionals, there weren't any questions on the rocky moons of the outer planets. But at state, 60% of the test consisted of Jupiter and Saturn's moons. Should I expect this topic to be a big part of the Nationals test?


No. You are not supposed to be studying ANY of the terrestrial planets. Take a closer look at the rules. That, is what you need to be studying. If 60% of the test was on Jupiter and Saturn's moons, it was a bad test. The only moons that you should be studying are : Mimas, Phoebe, Earth's moon, and Charon.


This is in the rules: "Participants must be knowledgable about the history and geologic processes involved in the formation and evolution of Earth's moon and other rocky bodies of the solar system."

On every test I have taken, theere have been questions on the inner planets. Usually about their moons, geologic features, and formation. Even on the test exchange, many tests have in depth questions about the terrestrial planets.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5u4d-_dJIE&feature=youtu.be
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1bpyCgoyiE&feature=youtu.be
you can use the videos as the guide to what you are supposed to study.

test exchange has tests from previous years, which will not be relevant this year.
State & Regional 2019 events B
<3 Solar system 1st State & Regional<3
:?: Water Quality 1st State & Regional :?:
8-) Anatomy and Physiology 1st State & Regional 8-)
:roll: Heredity 4th state, 2nd regional :roll:

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Re: Solar System B

Postby Girlpower05 » May 7th, 2019, 7:11 pm

We had our State tournament last weekend, but unfortunately, our team will not be moving forward :cry: . Since I won't be doing this event again, here is the cheat sheet I made over the last two years: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BZztSQ5f3c8v-7Y9lXcGcRhYQTAcwHoQ-iAhe9QGW90/edit?usp=sharing I hope that this may help someone.

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Re: Solar System B

Postby space-egg » May 15th, 2019, 11:19 am

https://www.soinc.org/sites/default/fil ... est_V2.pdf
This test was posted on soinc.org. It's a sample 2019 test. Would it be expected that the person who wrote the sample test will also write the Nationals test?
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Re: Solar System B

Postby LiteralRhinoceros » May 15th, 2019, 11:20 am

space-egg wrote:https://www.soinc.org/sites/default/files/uploaded_files/SS19_Sample_Test_V2.pdf
This test was posted on soinc.org. It's a sample 2019 test. Would it be expected that the person who wrote the sample test will also write the Nationals test?

ye im pretty sure its dusty again
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Re: Solar System B

Postby 19alekb » May 23rd, 2019, 9:10 am

what was the national test from last year like?

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Re: Solar System B

Postby Killboe » May 23rd, 2019, 12:24 pm

19alekb wrote:what was the national test from last year like?


Similar to this year's sample test, except a bit harder.
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