Solar System B

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space-egg
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Re: Solar System B

Postby space-egg » March 5th, 2019, 12:28 pm

MatthewK. wrote:Hey everyone! This is my first year doing Solar System. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the best places to look for information. I know that the rotation is about to end, but I still want to know as Regionals at BGSU are coming up this weekend and I don't really have a good cheat sheet. Thanks!


I recommend NASA, especially for the missions and dwarf planets. For things like asteroids, I used many sources.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby bp31000 » March 5th, 2019, 1:49 pm

MatthewK. wrote:Hey everyone! This is my first year doing Solar System. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the best places to look for information. I know that the rotation is about to end, but I still want to know as Regionals at BGSU are coming up this weekend and I don't really have a good cheat sheet. Thanks!

it is difficult to find all things in one place, even in wikipedia. Start with NASA site, also if you google individual things Eg: planetary processes, you will find some university teaching pages or pdfs also image search for important crates, mountains etc with names, you will encounter most images you are going to get in the exam.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby space-egg » March 5th, 2019, 2:27 pm

I'm working on my notes on the dwarf planets, and I can't find any resources for the sizes of Pluto and Eris. Some websites say that Eris is bigger in volume and Pluto is smaller, while others say that Pluto is larger in volume but Eris is larger in mass. Can someone please link me to solid proof? Thank you!
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Re: Solar System B

Postby Killboe » March 5th, 2019, 7:12 pm

space-egg wrote:I'm working on my notes on the dwarf planets, and I can't find any resources for the sizes of Pluto and Eris. Some websites say that Eris is bigger in volume and Pluto is smaller, while others say that Pluto is larger in volume but Eris is larger in mass. Can someone please link me to solid proof? Thank you!


Pluto is larger than Eris, Eris has more mass than Pluto. I don't have solid proof. But I am 100% sure on that.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby space-egg » March 6th, 2019, 6:31 am

Killboe wrote:
space-egg wrote:I'm working on my notes on the dwarf planets, and I can't find any resources for the sizes of Pluto and Eris. Some websites say that Eris is bigger in volume and Pluto is smaller, while others say that Pluto is larger in volume but Eris is larger in mass. Can someone please link me to solid proof? Thank you!


Pluto is larger than Eris, Eris has more mass than Pluto. I don't have solid proof. But I am 100% sure on that.


Okay, that's what I originally thought. Thank you!
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Re: Solar System B

Postby Sharan.thiru » March 6th, 2019, 12:49 pm

bp31000 wrote:
MatthewK. wrote:Hey everyone! This is my first year doing Solar System. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the best places to look for information. I know that the rotation is about to end, but I still want to know as Regionals at BGSU are coming up this weekend and I don't really have a good cheat sheet. Thanks!

it is difficult to find all things in one place, even in wikipedia. Start with NASA site, also if you google individual things Eg: planetary processes, you will find some university teaching pages or pdfs also image search for important crates, mountains etc with names, you will encounter most images you are going to get in the exam.


It's easier to find info on everything at [url]solarsystem.nasa.gov[/url]. I used it and got pretty much all 4 pages from that
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Re: Solar System B

Postby AwersomeUser » March 6th, 2019, 7:24 pm

Sharan.thiru wrote:
bp31000 wrote:
MatthewK. wrote:Hey everyone! This is my first year doing Solar System. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the best places to look for information. I know that the rotation is about to end, but I still want to know as Regionals at BGSU are coming up this weekend and I don't really have a good cheat sheet. Thanks!

it is difficult to find all things in one place, even in wikipedia. Start with NASA site, also if you google individual things Eg: planetary processes, you will find some university teaching pages or pdfs also image search for important crates, mountains etc with names, you will encounter most images you are going to get in the exam.


It's easier to find info on everything at [url]solarsystem.nasa.gov[/url]. I used it and got pretty much all 4 pages from that

I tried to avoid Wikipedia at the beginning and there’s literally no other reliable updated websites besides that NASA website, which it doesn’t have enough details so now I prefer Wikipedia.

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Re: Solar System B

Postby fiddhantfen » March 12th, 2019, 6:04 am

AwersomeUser wrote:
Sharan.thiru wrote:
bp31000 wrote:it is difficult to find all things in one place, even in wikipedia. Start with NASA site, also if you google individual things Eg: planetary processes, you will find some university teaching pages or pdfs also image search for important crates, mountains etc with names, you will encounter most images you are going to get in the exam.


It's easier to find info on everything at [url]solarsystem.nasa.gov[/url]. I used it and got pretty much all 4 pages from that

I tried to avoid Wikipedia at the beginning and there’s literally no other reliable updated websites besides that NASA website, which it doesn’t have enough details so now I prefer Wikipedia.


Wiki is really useful...at the bottom they cite all their sources, so you can use those too.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby AwersomeUser » March 18th, 2019, 7:21 pm

What does the rule mean by “Remote sensing, imagery, and satellite measurements” and also “Surface dating, regolith, volcanism & weathering, cratering & impact processes”? Can some give some specific examples? (Oops I just realized I haven’t started studying specifically for those)

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Re: Solar System B

Postby bp31000 » March 19th, 2019, 11:45 am

AwersomeUser wrote:What does the rule mean by “Remote sensing, imagery, and satellite measurements” and also “Surface dating, regolith, volcanism & weathering, cratering & impact processes”? Can some give some specific examples? (Oops I just realized I haven’t started studying specifically for those)

you will have to search each of those separately or find them all in wikipedia. lunar and planetary institute (LPI) site has "Out of school time activities" tab >> look for "explore!" >> "shaping the planets" >> It has Volcanism,Tectonism, Erosion, Impact Cratering links.

also in solarsystem.NASA page, you have >> MORE >> Basics of Space flight >> Chapter 12 is Science instruments, everything about remote sensing etc are there with images!
State & Regional 2019 events B
<3 Solar system 1st State & Regional<3
:?: Water Quality 1st State & Regional :?:
8-) Anatomy and Physiology 1st State & Regional 8-)
:roll: Heredity 4th state, 2nd regional :roll:

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Re: Solar System B

Postby AwersomeUser » March 20th, 2019, 3:45 pm

bp31000 wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:What does the rule mean by “Remote sensing, imagery, and satellite measurements” and also “Surface dating, regolith, volcanism & weathering, cratering & impact processes”? Can some give some specific examples? (Oops I just realized I haven’t started studying specifically for those)

you will have to search each of those separately or find them all in wikipedia. lunar and planetary institute (LPI) site has "Out of school time activities" tab >> look for "explore!" >> "shaping the planets" >> It has Volcanism,Tectonism, Erosion, Impact Cratering links.

also in solarsystem.NASA page, you have >> MORE >> Basics of Space flight >> Chapter 12 is Science instruments, everything about remote sensing etc are there with images!


Ok thanks! (Even though that’s not exactly what I am asking)

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Re: Solar System B

Postby Sharan.thiru » March 25th, 2019, 12:42 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:
bp31000 wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:What does the rule mean by “Remote sensing, imagery, and satellite measurements” and also “Surface dating, regolith, volcanism & weathering, cratering & impact processes”? Can some give some specific examples? (Oops I just realized I haven’t started studying specifically for those)

you will have to search each of those separately or find them all in wikipedia. lunar and planetary institute (LPI) site has "Out of school time activities" tab >> look for "explore!" >> "shaping the planets" >> It has Volcanism,Tectonism, Erosion, Impact Cratering links.

also in solarsystem.NASA page, you have >> MORE >> Basics of Space flight >> Chapter 12 is Science instruments, everything about remote sensing etc are there with images!


Ok thanks! (Even though that’s not exactly what I am asking)

That would be like identifying what features are on the surface of the planet, what the highlighted partis made up of, or what would you expect to find in a certain part of a planet or satellite, what do certain feature in a crater look like, and stuff like that.
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Re: Solar System B

Postby AwersomeUser » March 30th, 2019, 12:41 pm

Sharan.thiru wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
bp31000 wrote:you will have to search each of those separately or find them all in wikipedia. lunar and planetary institute (LPI) site has "Out of school time activities" tab >> look for "explore!" >> "shaping the planets" >> It has Volcanism,Tectonism, Erosion, Impact Cratering links.

also in solarsystem.NASA page, you have >> MORE >> Basics of Space flight >> Chapter 12 is Science instruments, everything about remote sensing etc are there with images!


Ok thanks! (Even though that’s not exactly what I am asking)

That would be like identifying what features are on the surface of the planet, what the highlighted partis made up of, or what would you expect to find in a certain part of a planet or satellite, what do certain feature in a crater look like, and stuff like that.


Oh ok. How much harder would you say state tests are? (My guess is that there will not be any mutiple choice questions and maybe more identifying type of questions.) How much time do you think I should spend preparing since my competition is next Friday (4/5)? What topics are likely be asked the most? (I mean like would the moon, pluto, or whatever be asked the most.) I am thinking about remaking my cheat sheet but I struggle to choose what to put on it...

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Re: Solar System B

Postby Killboe » March 30th, 2019, 6:39 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:
Sharan.thiru wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
Ok thanks! (Even though that’s not exactly what I am asking)

That would be like identifying what features are on the surface of the planet, what the highlighted partis made up of, or what would you expect to find in a certain part of a planet or satellite, what do certain feature in a crater look like, and stuff like that.


Oh ok. How much harder would you say state tests are? (My guess is that there will not be any mutiple choice questions and maybe more identifying type of questions.) How much time do you think I should spend preparing since my competition is next Friday (4/5)? What topics are likely be asked the most? (I mean like would the moon, pluto, or whatever be asked the most.) I am thinking about remaking my cheat sheet but I struggle to choose what to put on it...


I just took a states test (FL). The test was A M A Z I N G, everything in it was on the rule sheet. It was 170 questions, almost all was short response. As for your cheat sheet, for each celestial body I would include rotation period, orbit period, distance, internal structure, atmosphere, formation, resonance with other bodies, any unique features, eccentricity, notable geologic features, diameter, mass, size, what it's classified as, anything else really. But yeah I have that and more for each celestial body. For Oumuamua and 2007OR10 though, you will need a LOT of information. A lot of the test was identifying but for the most part it was easy, it will ask for anything and everything, so prepare. Some questions were kind of not on the rules (Vesta and 2010TK, unless I don't remember the rules). However, solar is a fairly easy event and if it's easy for you. You know that it's easy for others, so include everything. Also, on the test it was asking for surface temp a lot in Celcius, so make sure it's Celcius and not Kelvin (jokes on the test makers i knew how to convert it). Good luck at states and I wish you the best!
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Re: Solar System B

Postby LiteralRhinoceros » March 31st, 2019, 10:22 am

Killboe wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
Sharan.thiru wrote:That would be like identifying what features are on the surface of the planet, what the highlighted partis made up of, or what would you expect to find in a certain part of a planet or satellite, what do certain feature in a crater look like, and stuff like that.


Oh ok. How much harder would you say state tests are? (My guess is that there will not be any mutiple choice questions and maybe more identifying type of questions.) How much time do you think I should spend preparing since my competition is next Friday (4/5)? What topics are likely be asked the most? (I mean like would the moon, pluto, or whatever be asked the most.) I am thinking about remaking my cheat sheet but I struggle to choose what to put on it...


I just took a states test (FL). The test was A M A Z I N G, everything in it was on the rule sheet. It was 170 questions, almost all was short response. As for your cheat sheet, for each celestial body I would include rotation period, orbit period, distance, internal structure, atmosphere, formation, resonance with other bodies, any unique features, eccentricity, notable geologic features, diameter, mass, size, what it's classified as, anything else really. But yeah I have that and more for each celestial body. For Oumuamua and 2007OR10 though, you will need a LOT of information. A lot of the test was identifying but for the most part it was easy, it will ask for anything and everything, so prepare. Some questions were kind of not on the rules (Vesta and 2010TK, unless I don't remember the rules). However, solar is a fairly easy event and if it's easy for you. You know that it's easy for others, so include everything. Also, on the test it was asking for surface temp a lot in Celcius, so make sure it's Celcius and not Kelvin (jokes on the test makers i knew how to convert it). Good luck at states and I wish you the best!


does florida release state tests?
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