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Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: March 17th, 2019, 12:31 pm
by bryan,boyd
Hey, does anyone know what event will be replacing Fermi Questions for the upcoming 2019-20 season?

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: March 17th, 2019, 1:39 pm
by Unome
bryan,boyd wrote:Hey, does anyone know what event will be replacing Fermi Questions for the upcoming 2019-20 season?

Hard to say with Inquiry events, the rotation doesn't often seem to be known more than a year or two in advance. I think a programming-based event is most likely, of which there are a number of options.

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: March 26th, 2019, 6:16 pm
by FourtyOne
Anyone know if fermi is switching out next year cuz I'm absolute pigeon at it

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: March 26th, 2019, 6:39 pm
by will0416
FourtyOne wrote:Anyone know if fermi is switching out next year cuz I'm absolute pigeon at it

FQ will not be an event next year.

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: April 6th, 2019, 8:58 pm
by xiangyu
What is a good way to practice? My partner and I have been looking at practice tests from invitations and doing fermi questions that way, how do other teams that do well prepare?

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: April 6th, 2019, 10:42 pm
by Name
xiangyu wrote:What is a good way to practice? My partner and I have been looking at practice tests from invitations and doing fermi questions that way, how do other teams that do well prepare?

My strategy is just take more tests. Just keep taking them. Take as many as you can. That's basically it lol. I think this is the only real way to practice for Fermi, I've never found any other way to.

Note questions you didn't get full credit on in the test (or even questions you did but weren't sure on), google the formulas, facts or whatever else you need to solve the question, and figure out how to do the question correctly. Try and memorize every value you used (unless it's completely irrelevant, that's your call, but sometimes even seemingly completely irrelevant facts can show up). Writing down the facts somewhere would probably help although I usually never did that.

Don't stop taking tests. If you think you know everything, there's always more facts to memorize.

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: April 7th, 2019, 8:37 am
by Unome
Name wrote:
xiangyu wrote:What is a good way to practice? My partner and I have been looking at practice tests from invitations and doing fermi questions that way, how do other teams that do well prepare?

My strategy is just take more tests. Just keep taking them. Take as many as you can. That's basically it lol. I think this is the only real way to practice for Fermi, I've never found any other way to.

Note questions you didn't get full credit on in the test (or even questions you did but weren't sure on), google the formulas, facts or whatever else you need to solve the question, and figure out how to do the question correctly. Try and memorize every value you used (unless it's completely irrelevant, that's your call, but sometimes even seemingly completely irrelevant facts can show up). Writing down the facts somewhere would probably help although I usually never did that.

Don't stop taking tests. If you think you know everything, there's always more facts to memorize.

This is pretty much exactly what I would recommend.

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: April 7th, 2019, 10:26 am
by xiangyu
Sounds good, thanks, everyone.

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: May 2nd, 2019, 3:49 am
by Name
MoniqueCordon wrote:My reason for loving physics is different from most. Many of the people who answered here, as well as people that I talk to, say they love it because it explains so many phenomena. In college, I do basketball and read some interesting blogs about basketball. I combine study and sports, because I order my dissertation on Fermi questions here [spam link removed] not for the first time. If someone also enjoys sports in college, then write. Here is an example: So how do I get the diameter of the Earth.

1. the formula for a circle is 2 pi r, right? where r is the radius and pi is about 3
2. so 24000 mi = 2 x 3 x r = 6 x r

3. therefore 24000 mi / 6 = r = 4000 mi

4. the diameter of the earth is 2 x r = 8000 mi, where the diameter is 2 times the radius

5. 1 mi = 1.6 km so 8000 mi x 1.6 km/mi = 12800 km

(the correct answer is ~12742 km)


Did bots just get smarter?

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: May 2nd, 2019, 8:56 am
by jimmy-bond
Name wrote:
MoniqueCordon wrote:My reason for loving physics is different from most. Many of the people who answered here, as well as people that I talk to, say they love it because it explains so many phenomena. In college, I do basketball and read some interesting blogs about basketball. I combine study and sports, because I order my dissertation on Fermi questions here [spam link removed] not for the first time. If someone also enjoys sports in college, then write. Here is an example: So how do I get the diameter of the Earth.

1. the formula for a circle is 2 pi r, right? where r is the radius and pi is about 3
2. so 24000 mi = 2 x 3 x r = 6 x r

3. therefore 24000 mi / 6 = r = 4000 mi

4. the diameter of the earth is 2 x r = 8000 mi, where the diameter is 2 times the radius

5. 1 mi = 1.6 km so 8000 mi x 1.6 km/mi = 12800 km

(the correct answer is ~12742 km)


Did bots just get smarter?

BRUH this bot is better at Fermi than I am.

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: May 2nd, 2019, 9:43 am
by John Richardsim
jimmy-bond wrote:
Name wrote:
MoniqueCordon wrote:My reason for loving physics is different from most. Many of the people who answered here, as well as people that I talk to, say they love it because it explains so many phenomena. In college, I do basketball and read some interesting blogs about basketball. I combine study and sports, because I order my dissertation on Fermi questions here [spam link removed] not for the first time. If someone also enjoys sports in college, then write. Here is an example: So how do I get the diameter of the Earth.

1. the formula for a circle is 2 pi r, right? where r is the radius and pi is about 3
2. so 24000 mi = 2 x 3 x r = 6 x r

3. therefore 24000 mi / 6 = r = 4000 mi

4. the diameter of the earth is 2 x r = 8000 mi, where the diameter is 2 times the radius

5. 1 mi = 1.6 km so 8000 mi x 1.6 km/mi = 12800 km

(the correct answer is ~12742 km)


Did bots just get smarter?

BRUH this bot is better at Fermi than I am.

You sure? It didn't put its answer in Fermi Answer form. You just wait, it's going to get dead last at nationals.

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: May 25th, 2019, 6:23 pm
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
I dunno if anyone's seen this but https://andrechek.com/projects/fermi

Re: Fermi Questions C

Posted: June 24th, 2019, 3:46 pm
by reddragon644
If only I had seen that earlier... seems fun lol.