Fossils B/C

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 18th, 2019, 6:39 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:Also I am struggling to decide the right formating system...
Should it be a legnthy paragraph format...
Image
Or a bit shorter paragraph format...
Image
Or like this...
Image

Please help I was trying to redo the binder in the format of the 3rd image... If I do that should I attempt to break everything down into bullet points (when I am just sepeating sentences...) like distrigushing features for the 3rd image?

And also (about) how much harder is states?

Whichever one you can read most easily and locate info in is best. Your decision. States is around the same as regionals for Pennsylvania, but states and regionals tournaments are generally independent so your results may vary.

Oh and 1st and 2nd are the same image?

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby RockRoll92 » February 18th, 2019, 7:05 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:Also I am struggling to decide the right formating system...
Should it be a legnthy paragraph format...
Image
Or a bit shorter paragraph format...
Image
Or like this...
Image

Please help I was trying to redo the binder in the format of the 3rd image... If I do that should I attempt to break everything down into bullet points (when I am just sepeating sentences...) like distrigushing features for the 3rd image?

And also (about) how much harder is states?


Are... are you making these on your phone/ tablet? I hope you are using a laptop or computer
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby AwersomeUser » February 19th, 2019, 7:28 am

Rock&Roll92 wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:Also I am struggling to decide the right formating system...
Should it be a legnthy paragraph format...
Image
Or a bit shorter paragraph format...
Image
Or like this...
Image

Please help I was trying to redo the binder in the format of the 3rd image... If I do that should I attempt to break everything down into bullet points (when I am just sepeating sentences...) like distrigushing features for the 3rd image?

And also (about) how much harder is states?


Are... are you making these on your phone/ tablet? I hope you are using a laptop or computer


Yes... But I am working on a laptop now after seeing this...

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby GurtYo » February 19th, 2019, 5:25 pm

When finding your information, do you write down information about the living version as well as the fossilized version? For example, could I just use Wikipedia, even though it talks about the living version? I know that a lot of the genera on the list are extinct, but some *such as Carcharodon* are still living.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 19th, 2019, 5:26 pm

GurtYo wrote:When finding your information, do you write down information about the living version as well as the fossilized version? For example, could I just use Wikipedia, even though it talks about the living version? I know that a lot of the genera on the list are extinct, but some *such as Carcharodon* are still living.

They should be the same organism, but some things you can write about the fossils are the distribution, commonly found fossils, etc.

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby GurtYo » February 19th, 2019, 6:03 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
GurtYo wrote:When finding your information, do you write down information about the living version as well as the fossilized version? For example, could I just use Wikipedia, even though it talks about the living version? I know that a lot of the genera on the list are extinct, but some *such as Carcharodon* are still living.

They should be the same organism, but some things you can write about the fossils are the distribution, commonly found fossils, etc.

So I don't write about how it lived, ate, etc?
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 19th, 2019, 6:17 pm

GurtYo wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
GurtYo wrote:When finding your information, do you write down information about the living version as well as the fossilized version? For example, could I just use Wikipedia, even though it talks about the living version? I know that a lot of the genera on the list are extinct, but some *such as Carcharodon* are still living.

They should be the same organism, but some things you can write about the fossils are the distribution, commonly found fossils, etc.

So I don't write about how it lived, ate, etc?

Do write about those. It's probably similar to its current lifestyle though.

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby jennarholt » February 20th, 2019, 6:34 pm

Okay, so I need a reply ASAP (we've got a week to comp. and we have to cram to finish our notes because my partner and I are stupid). When identifying the taxa, do they need to be down to the level as in like KPCOFGS? or just what's on the list, like KPOG?
seriously i only care about fossils it's kinda sad

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby AWildMudkip » February 20th, 2019, 6:42 pm

jennarholt wrote:Okay, so I need a reply ASAP (we've got a week to comp. and we have to cram to finish our notes because my partner and I are stupid). When identifying the taxa, do they need to be down to the level as in like KPCOFGS? or just what's on the list, like KPOG?


You only need to ID the most specific taxonomic level possible as indicated by the numbering on the list (unless otherwise specified by the test writer)
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby jennarholt » February 20th, 2019, 6:46 pm

AWildMudkip wrote:
jennarholt wrote:Okay, so I need a reply ASAP (we've got a week to comp. and we have to cram to finish our notes because my partner and I are stupid). When identifying the taxa, do they need to be down to the level as in like KPCOFGS? or just what's on the list, like KPOG?


You only need to ID the most specific taxonomic level possible as indicated by the numbering on the list (unless otherwise specified by the test writer)


Alright! Thank you!
seriously i only care about fossils it's kinda sad

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby AwersomeUser » February 21st, 2019, 1:35 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
GurtYo wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:They should be the same organism, but some things you can write about the fossils are the distribution, commonly found fossils, etc.

So I don't write about how it lived, ate, etc?

Do write about those. It's probably similar to its current lifestyle though.


So I shouldn't put this? The part of what organs and stuff like that the current ones have? However, should I put the comparison of the current ones to the fossils?

Features:
Possess a three-lobed caudal fin (also called a trilobate fin or a diphycercal tail).
A secondary tail extending past the primary tail separates the upper and lower halves of the coelacanth. Cosmoid scales act as thick armor to protect the coelacanth's exterior.
Several internal traits also aid in differentiating coelacanths from other lobe-finned fish.
At the back of the skull, the coelacanth possesses a hinge, the intracranial joint, which allows it to open its mouth extremely wide.
Retain an oil-filled notochord, a hollow, pressurized tube which is replaced by the vertebral column early in embryonic development in most other vertebrates.
Comparisons: Heart is shaped differently from that of most modern fish, with its chambers arranged in a straight tube. The cheeks of the coelacanth are unique because the opercular bone is very small and holds a large soft-tissue opercular flap. A spiracular chamber is present, but the spiracle is closed and never opens during development.[27] Coelacanth also possess a unique rostral organ within the ethmoid region of the braincase.[5][28] Also unique to extant coelacanths is the presence of a "fatty lung" or a fat-filled single-lobed vestigial lung, homologous to other fishes' swim bladder. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggest a unique specialization for deep-water habitats. There has also been discovered small, hard but flexible plates around the vestigial lung in adult specimen, though not around the fatty organ. The plates most likely had a regulation function for the volume of the lung.[29] Due to the size of the fatty organ, researchers assume it's responsible for the kidney's unusual relocation. The two kidneys, which are fused into one,[30] are located ventrally within the abdominal cavity, posterior to the cloaca.

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 21st, 2019, 2:45 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
GurtYo wrote:So I don't write about how it lived, ate, etc?

Do write about those. It's probably similar to its current lifestyle though.


So I shouldn't put this? The part of what organs and stuff like that the current ones have? However, should I put the comparison of the current ones to the fossils?

Features:
Possess a three-lobed caudal fin (also called a trilobate fin or a diphycercal tail).
A secondary tail extending past the primary tail separates the upper and lower halves of the coelacanth. Cosmoid scales act as thick armor to protect the coelacanth's exterior.
Several internal traits also aid in differentiating coelacanths from other lobe-finned fish.
At the back of the skull, the coelacanth possesses a hinge, the intracranial joint, which allows it to open its mouth extremely wide.
Retain an oil-filled notochord, a hollow, pressurized tube which is replaced by the vertebral column early in embryonic development in most other vertebrates.
Comparisons: Heart is shaped differently from that of most modern fish, with its chambers arranged in a straight tube. The cheeks of the coelacanth are unique because the opercular bone is very small and holds a large soft-tissue opercular flap. A spiracular chamber is present, but the spiracle is closed and never opens during development.[27] Coelacanth also possess a unique rostral organ within the ethmoid region of the braincase.[5][28] Also unique to extant coelacanths is the presence of a "fatty lung" or a fat-filled single-lobed vestigial lung, homologous to other fishes' swim bladder. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggest a unique specialization for deep-water habitats. There has also been discovered small, hard but flexible plates around the vestigial lung in adult specimen, though not around the fatty organ. The plates most likely had a regulation function for the volume of the lung.[29] Due to the size of the fatty organ, researchers assume it's responsible for the kidney's unusual relocation. The two kidneys, which are fused into one,[30] are located ventrally within the abdominal cavity, posterior to the cloaca.

You should definitely put it in your binder.

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby AwersomeUser » February 21st, 2019, 3:13 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Do write about those. It's probably similar to its current lifestyle though.


So I shouldn't put this? The part of what organs and stuff like that the current ones have? However, should I put the comparison of the current ones to the fossils?

Features:
Possess a three-lobed caudal fin (also called a trilobate fin or a diphycercal tail).
A secondary tail extending past the primary tail separates the upper and lower halves of the coelacanth. Cosmoid scales act as thick armor to protect the coelacanth's exterior.
Several internal traits also aid in differentiating coelacanths from other lobe-finned fish.
At the back of the skull, the coelacanth possesses a hinge, the intracranial joint, which allows it to open its mouth extremely wide.
Retain an oil-filled notochord, a hollow, pressurized tube which is replaced by the vertebral column early in embryonic development in most other vertebrates.
Comparisons: Heart is shaped differently from that of most modern fish, with its chambers arranged in a straight tube. The cheeks of the coelacanth are unique because the opercular bone is very small and holds a large soft-tissue opercular flap. A spiracular chamber is present, but the spiracle is closed and never opens during development.[27] Coelacanth also possess a unique rostral organ within the ethmoid region of the braincase.[5][28] Also unique to extant coelacanths is the presence of a "fatty lung" or a fat-filled single-lobed vestigial lung, homologous to other fishes' swim bladder. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggest a unique specialization for deep-water habitats. There has also been discovered small, hard but flexible plates around the vestigial lung in adult specimen, though not around the fatty organ. The plates most likely had a regulation function for the volume of the lung.[29] Due to the size of the fatty organ, researchers assume it's responsible for the kidney's unusual relocation. The two kidneys, which are fused into one,[30] are located ventrally within the abdominal cavity, posterior to the cloaca.

You should definitely put it in your binder.


Ok! Thanks a lot.

I only have at most 3 pages including photos and some fossils only a page so I am wondering am I putting too little stuff in. I don't think I need to worry about not having enough space to put stuff in so should I include stuff know when/who/where a fossil was first discovered?

And also, for certain fossils there are not many website showing up on google search that are helpful so does it usually mean it is a less well studied fossil so I can almost assume that it is not going to be on the test and therefore I don't have to concentrate as much on those?

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby MadCow2357 » February 21st, 2019, 3:54 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:Thanks a lot.

I only have at most 3 pages including photos and some fossils only a page so I am wondering am I putting too little stuff in. I don't think I need to worry about not having enough space to put stuff in so should I include stuff know when/who/where a fossil was first discovered?

And also, for certain fossils there are not many website showing up on google search that are helpful so does it usually mean it is a less well studied fossil so I can almost assume that it is not going to be on the test and therefore I don't have to concentrate as much on those?

Yes, it would be helpful to add stuff about a fossil's discovery.

A less well studied fossil might still be on a test. In fact, some test writer might even ask questions about the obscure fossils on purpose. If it's on the fossils list, you should probably prepare for it.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby AWildMudkip » February 21st, 2019, 5:58 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:And also, for certain fossils there are not many website showing up on google search that are helpful so does it usually mean it is a less well studied fossil so I can almost assume that it is not going to be on the test and therefore I don't have to concentrate as much on those?


For fossils that seemingly don't have a lot of info, use scholar.google.com. For test writing I've found a whole bunch of nice stuff to write about in scholarly articles.
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