Fossils B/C

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby AwersomeUser » February 6th, 2019, 5:44 pm

Ok. Hi again. So trilobite has tons of species and stuff so do you think this is enough? Do I have list some order/family?

Trilobites range from the Cambrian to the Permian. Next to ostracodes they are the most common arthropod fossil. Trilobite means three-lobed and refers to the three longitudinal divisions of their calcified exoskeleton. An axial lobe running down the center is attached to pleural lobes on either side. The head or chephalon is separated from the tail or pygidium by thorasic segments. As juveniles, trilobites were pelagic, swimming in the plankton. As adults, most trilobites were benthic detritus feeders, although there are some exceptions such as the agnostids, which are thought to have lived a pelagic life due to their world-wide distribution. Trilobites were one of the first organisms to have eyes and may have been the first with eyes that focused images. Many trilobite species lost their eyes through selection such as the agnositds and Cryptolithus.

Trilobites have compound eyes made of calcite crystals. Two important types of compound eye can be found in trilobites. Holochroal eyes consisted of hundreds (up to 15,000) of closely packed elongated prisms of calcite arranged in a hexagonal pattern. The lenses of these eyes must be viewed with the aid of magnification. Holochroal eyes produced composite images of the world, but with little resolution. Phacops trilobites possessed schizochroal eyes. Schizochroal eyes are made of larger spherical-shaped lenses numbering in the hundreds (up to 700) and separated by exoskeleton. Each lens is made of two calcite crystals arranged as a doublet lens. Ironically, the doublet lens was designed by Dutch scientist Christian Huygens (1629-1695) and the French philosopher Rene Descartes (1586-1650) to correct for spherical aberration. Through selection nature had anticipated the same design 400 million years earlier. The phacopid lens produced larger images bringing them into sharp focus.

Trilobites enjoyed a great adaptive radiation during the Cambrian reaching their peak in abundance and diversity. In fact, Trilobites are the biostratigraphic standard for the Cambrian. They declined during the Ordovician and were only a minor part of the seafloor fauna in the Silurian and Devonian. Trilobites did enjoy some increase in diversity during the Devonian; however, they never fully recovered from the late Devonian extinction event and vanished during the Permian

Edit oh wait oops I didn’t look at the list carefully but should I include as overview then put specific info on the genuses on the list? Are they like going to also test like the overall ones on the list or just the specific ones? Sorry for so many questions...
Last edited by AwersomeUser on February 6th, 2019, 5:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 6th, 2019, 5:51 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:Ok. Hi again. So trilobite has tons of species and stuff so do you think this is enough? Do I have list some order/family?

Trilobites range from the Cambrian to the Permian. Next to ostracodes they are the most common arthropod fossil. Trilobite means three-lobed and refers to the three longitudinal divisions of their calcified exoskeleton. An axial lobe running down the center is attached to pleural lobes on either side. The head or chephalon is separated from the tail or pygidium by thorasic segments. As juveniles, trilobites were pelagic, swimming in the plankton. As adults, most trilobites were benthic detritus feeders, although there are some exceptions such as the agnostids, which are thought to have lived a pelagic life due to their world-wide distribution. Trilobites were one of the first organisms to have eyes and may have been the first with eyes that focused images. Many trilobite species lost their eyes through selection such as the agnositds and Cryptolithus.

Trilobites have compound eyes made of calcite crystals. Two important types of compound eye can be found in trilobites. Holochroal eyes consisted of hundreds (up to 15,000) of closely packed elongated prisms of calcite arranged in a hexagonal pattern. The lenses of these eyes must be viewed with the aid of magnification. Holochroal eyes produced composite images of the world, but with little resolution. Phacops trilobites possessed schizochroal eyes. Schizochroal eyes are made of larger spherical-shaped lenses numbering in the hundreds (up to 700) and separated by exoskeleton. Each lens is made of two calcite crystals arranged as a doublet lens. Ironically, the doublet lens was designed by Dutch scientist Christian Huygens (1629-1695) and the French philosopher Rene Descartes (1586-1650) to correct for spherical aberration. Through selection nature had anticipated the same design 400 million years earlier. The phacopid lens produced larger images bringing them into sharp focus.

Trilobites enjoyed a great adaptive radiation during the Cambrian reaching their peak in abundance and diversity. In fact, Trilobites are the biostratigraphic standard for the Cambrian. They declined during the Ordovician and were only a minor part of the seafloor fauna in the Silurian and Devonian. Trilobites did enjoy some increase in diversity during the Devonian; however, they never fully recovered from the late Devonian extinction event and vanished during the Permian

You might want diagrams of trilobite anatomy

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby AwersomeUser » February 6th, 2019, 5:53 pm

Ok so are they like going to also test like the overall ones on the list or more of the more like specific ones? Sorry for so many questions...

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby isotelus » February 6th, 2019, 5:58 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:Ok so are they like going to also test like the overall ones on the list or more of the more like specific ones? Sorry for so many questions...

All of them. They can have specific genii or questions pertaining to all trilobites. This goes for everything on the list.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Unome » February 7th, 2019, 10:31 am

AwersomeUser wrote:Ok. Hi again. So trilobite has tons of species and stuff so do you think this is enough? Do I have list some order/family?

Trilobites range from the Cambrian to the Permian. Next to ostracodes they are the most common arthropod fossil. Trilobite means three-lobed and refers to the three longitudinal divisions of their calcified exoskeleton. An axial lobe running down the center is attached to pleural lobes on either side. The head or chephalon is separated from the tail or pygidium by thorasic segments. As juveniles, trilobites were pelagic, swimming in the plankton. As adults, most trilobites were benthic detritus feeders, although there are some exceptions such as the agnostids, which are thought to have lived a pelagic life due to their world-wide distribution. Trilobites were one of the first organisms to have eyes and may have been the first with eyes that focused images. Many trilobite species lost their eyes through selection such as the agnositds and Cryptolithus.

Trilobites have compound eyes made of calcite crystals. Two important types of compound eye can be found in trilobites. Holochroal eyes consisted of hundreds (up to 15,000) of closely packed elongated prisms of calcite arranged in a hexagonal pattern. The lenses of these eyes must be viewed with the aid of magnification. Holochroal eyes produced composite images of the world, but with little resolution. Phacops trilobites possessed schizochroal eyes. Schizochroal eyes are made of larger spherical-shaped lenses numbering in the hundreds (up to 700) and separated by exoskeleton. Each lens is made of two calcite crystals arranged as a doublet lens. Ironically, the doublet lens was designed by Dutch scientist Christian Huygens (1629-1695) and the French philosopher Rene Descartes (1586-1650) to correct for spherical aberration. Through selection nature had anticipated the same design 400 million years earlier. The phacopid lens produced larger images bringing them into sharp focus.

Trilobites enjoyed a great adaptive radiation during the Cambrian reaching their peak in abundance and diversity. In fact, Trilobites are the biostratigraphic standard for the Cambrian. They declined during the Ordovician and were only a minor part of the seafloor fauna in the Silurian and Devonian. Trilobites did enjoy some increase in diversity during the Devonian; however, they never fully recovered from the late Devonian extinction event and vanished during the Permian

Edit oh wait oops I didn’t look at the list carefully but should I include as overview then put specific info on the genuses on the list? Are they like going to also test like the overall ones on the list or just the specific ones? Sorry for so many questions...

That's good info, although in my opinion it could do with a bit of condensing (lots of unnecessary words in there). You've hit all the major points that are likely to be asked for trilobites in general.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby HippoLowercase » February 9th, 2019, 6:35 pm

Hey, does anyone know ways on how to differentiate pictures of equus and mesohippus other than looking at the number of toes? Sometimes the feet are hidden, so I want to know another reliable way to id them.

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby dchen22 » February 10th, 2019, 5:41 am

Does anyone know if Favosites was reef forming?

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 10th, 2019, 9:27 am

dchen22 wrote:Does anyone know if Favosites was reef forming?

It was

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Eureka314 » February 10th, 2019, 11:47 am

How in depth are we expected to study with topics like radiometric dating? Are the fundamentals enough or do we need to know the specific types like radiocarbon, potassium-argon, uranium-lead, etc?
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 10th, 2019, 12:09 pm

Eureka314 wrote:How in depth are we expected to study with topics like radiometric dating? Are the fundamentals enough or do we need to know the specific types like radiocarbon, potassium-argon, uranium-lead, etc?

Know the fundamentals and have a list of half-lifes for different elements

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby AWildMudkip » February 10th, 2019, 10:15 pm

HippoLowercase wrote:Hey, does anyone know ways on how to differentiate pictures of equus and mesohippus other than looking at the number of toes? Sometimes the feet are hidden, so I want to know another reliable way to id them.


If you have images of the skull/teeth, the best way to tell is that mesohippus has triangular and somewhat pointy parallel ridges for each tooth while equus is a flat tooth.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby HippoLowercase » February 10th, 2019, 11:18 pm

AWildMudkip wrote:
HippoLowercase wrote:Hey, does anyone know ways on how to differentiate pictures of equus and mesohippus other than looking at the number of toes? Sometimes the feet are hidden, so I want to know another reliable way to id them.


If you have images of the skull/teeth, the best way to tell is that mesohippus has triangular and somewhat pointy parallel ridges for each tooth while equus is a flat tooth.

Cool, thanks for the help!

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby meilingkuo » February 11th, 2019, 12:01 pm

Is fossils list allowed outside of binder? Should it printed single-sided or double-sided if ok to be outside of binder?

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby dxu46 » February 11th, 2019, 12:04 pm

meilingkuo wrote:Is fossils list allowed outside of binder? Should it printed single-sided or double-sided if ok to be outside of binder?

Per the rules manual, "no material may be removed from the binder" (Rule 2.b.)
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby hippo9 » February 11th, 2019, 12:06 pm

dxu46 wrote:
meilingkuo wrote:Is fossils list allowed outside of binder? Should it printed single-sided or double-sided if ok to be outside of binder?

Per the rules manual, "no material may be removed from the binder" (Rule 2.b.)

Actually, if the event is not run at stations, rule 2.b. does not prohibit removal of materials. Rule 2.b. only prohibits removal of materials if the event is run as stations, and actually only specifies stations with specimens or displays.
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