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Boomilever B/C

Posted: June 30th, 2018, 10:13 am
by windu34
Boomilever B/C: Teams will design and build a Boomilever meeting requirements specified in the rules supporting a minimum load and to achieve the highest structural efficiency.

Boomilever Wiki Wiki

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Past Threads: 2013, 2014

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 6:08 am
by Cow481
What would be specified as the loading point, the middle, front, or end of the loading block?

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 6:32 am
by 0ddrenaline
What would be specified as the loading point, the middle, front, or end of the loading block?
The centerline of the chain, as per Section 4, part II, rule e.ii.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 8:59 am
by Alex-RCHS
The Boomilever rules are 3 pages long! Crazy.

Also, they tried to eliminate "ultralight" structures that were present in towers last year by tiering anything below 3000g. This seems odd to me though, considering there is no bonus like there was last year. The mathematical advantage of the bonus was a much greater contributor to the presence of "ultralights" than any sort of mechanical advantage, if I understand correctly.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 9:08 am
by triangulator
That's correct, but it is also much easier to build a light boomilever than light tower.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 9:14 am
by TheChiScientist
Took me a while to process them but I like how it will pan out. My only confusion is how the J-hook will work...

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 10:14 am
by triangulator
Yeah, it's totally going to mess up my triangular design.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 10:39 am
by daydreamer0023
Took me a while to process them but I like how it will pan out. My only confusion is how the J-hook will work...
Check out the 2014 forum discussions on Boomilever. I believe they have found a good way to do this.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2018, 7:06 am
by Sciencer101
I saw this design called a "compression beam" on the scioly wiki where it is basically 2 tension sticks attached to a hollow cylinder of balsa wood instead of your standard compression member. The wiki also said that it can be very competitive. I was wondering how you would go about constructing this, and whether or not it would be effective. Working with a drill on a boomilever seems a little... overpowered. Also, what are the estimated competitive weights this ear? For towers the competitive ones were ~ 6-7 g, but it seems like you could make a very light boomilever.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2018, 7:20 am
by Unome
I saw this design called a "compression beam" on the scioly wiki where it is basically 2 tension sticks attached to a hollow cylinder of balsa wood instead of your standard compression member. The wiki also said that it can be very competitive. I was wondering how you would go about constructing this, and whether or not it would be effective. Working with a drill on a boomilever seems a little... overpowered. Also, what are the estimated competitive weights this ear? For towers the competitive ones were ~ 6-7 g, but it seems like you could make a very light boomilever.
The cylinder would be made by taking a sheet and rolling it (there's a process involving soaking it in warm water/steam, although I don't know the details). It's quite difficult, both because the construction takes a long time and is very delicate, and it's quite a challenge to find a uniform sheet that's strong enough.

Boomilever scores tend to be lower. As a general rule of thumb, I would take Towers scores from last year and divide them by 2 to get roughly equivalent boomilever scores.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2018, 8:48 am
by Sciencer101
I saw this design called a "compression beam" on the scioly wiki where it is basically 2 tension sticks attached to a hollow cylinder of balsa wood instead of your standard compression member. The wiki also said that it can be very competitive. I was wondering how you would go about constructing this, and whether or not it would be effective. Working with a drill on a boomilever seems a little... overpowered. Also, what are the estimated competitive weights this ear? For towers the competitive ones were ~ 6-7 g, but it seems like you could make a very light boomilever.
The cylinder would be made by taking a sheet and rolling it (there's a process involving soaking it in warm water/steam, although I don't know the details). It's quite difficult, both because the construction takes a long time and is very delicate, and it's quite a challenge to find a uniform sheet that's strong enough.

Boomilever scores tend to be lower. As a general rule of thumb, I would take Towers scores from last year and divide them by 2 to get roughly equivalent boomilever scores.
So if 2500 is a standard competitive tower score, that would mean the standard boomilever (@ 5 g) would only hold ~ 6.25 kg? That seems much lower than it should be.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2018, 10:37 am
by Unome
I saw this design called a "compression beam" on the scioly wiki where it is basically 2 tension sticks attached to a hollow cylinder of balsa wood instead of your standard compression member. The wiki also said that it can be very competitive. I was wondering how you would go about constructing this, and whether or not it would be effective. Working with a drill on a boomilever seems a little... overpowered. Also, what are the estimated competitive weights this ear? For towers the competitive ones were ~ 6-7 g, but it seems like you could make a very light boomilever.
The cylinder would be made by taking a sheet and rolling it (there's a process involving soaking it in warm water/steam, although I don't know the details). It's quite difficult, both because the construction takes a long time and is very delicate, and it's quite a challenge to find a uniform sheet that's strong enough.

Boomilever scores tend to be lower. As a general rule of thumb, I would take Towers scores from last year and divide them by 2 to get roughly equivalent boomilever scores.
So if 2500 is a standard competitive tower score, that would mean the standard boomilever (@ 5 g) would only hold ~ 6.25 kg? That seems much lower than it should be.
Ruels this year are comparable to 2014, except for a slightly smaller length. A 10g boomilever holding full weight is quite impressive. The compression part of the boomilever needs to withstand a lot more force than Towers.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2018, 3:03 pm
by Cow481
The cylinder would be made by taking a sheet and rolling it (there's a process involving soaking it in warm water/steam, although I don't know the details). It's quite difficult, both because the construction takes a long time and is very delicate, and it's quite a challenge to find a uniform sheet that's strong enough.

Boomilever scores tend to be lower. As a general rule of thumb, I would take Towers scores from last year and divide them by 2 to get roughly equivalent boomilever scores.
So if 2500 is a standard competitive tower score, that would mean the standard boomilever (@ 5 g) would only hold ~ 6.25 kg? That seems much lower than it should be.
Ruels this year are comparable to 2014, except for a slightly smaller length. A 10g boomilever holding full weight is quite impressive. The compression part of the boomilever needs to withstand a lot more force than Towers.
It seems from looking at the 2014 forums that nats placeing will be 1700-2200

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 5th, 2018, 4:16 pm
by Unome
So if 2500 is a standard competitive tower score, that would mean the standard boomilever (@ 5 g) would only hold ~ 6.25 kg? That seems much lower than it should be.
Ruels this year are comparable to 2014, except for a slightly smaller length. A 10g boomilever holding full weight is quite impressive. The compression part of the boomilever needs to withstand a lot more force than Towers.
It seems from looking at the 2014 forums that nats placeing will be 1700-2200
That seems plausible. Scores might be slightly higher than that. Although, at the highest levels I suspect individual variation is a more important determiner.

Re: Boomilever B/C

Posted: September 6th, 2018, 8:24 am
by dholdgreve
With the projection only being 40-45 cm, I think the scores will be considerable higher than they were in 2014.