Studying Question

Locked
varshahark
Member
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: February 24th, 2019, 12:19 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Studying Question

Post by varshahark » February 24th, 2019, 12:23 pm

I have used some recommended textbooks and read through their chapters, but I am having difficulty applying them to answer questions. Do you have any tips for that? How have you guys prepared for the test portion of this event with minimal prior knowledge and achieved success?

Also, what kind of information should I put in my binder and how should I organize it?

Thanks.

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1523
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Studying Question

Post by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 24th, 2019, 12:35 pm

varshahark wrote:I have used some recommended textbooks and read through their chapters, but I am having difficulty applying them to answer questions. Do you have any tips for that? How have you guys prepared for the test portion of this event with minimal prior knowledge and achieved success?

Also, what kind of information should I put in my binder and how should I organize it?

Thanks.
I would suggest looking at a bunch of practice problems and putting whatever you don't remember in the binder. Also put stuff like charts of specific heats, the periodic table, etc. I generally organize my binder with a header for every topic listed in the rules.

What sort of test problems are you having trouble with?

varshahark
Member
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: February 24th, 2019, 12:19 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Studying Question

Post by varshahark » February 24th, 2019, 12:55 pm

I usually struggle with long word problems on topics such as energy (just word problems in general I guess). For example: The outdoor temperature is Boston during winter is -10.0 ̊C. Since the wall and theroof of the house are relatively thin (0.500 m), there will be a loss of energy, which isreleased to the surrounding (neglect the heat transferred to the water and to/throughthe ground). The heat conductivity of the wall and roof is 1.00 W K​-1​ m​-1​. Calculatethe energy (in MJ) that is needed to maintain the indoor temperature for 1 day (24.0h). (7 pt)

That is a question taken from an invitational test and although I have learned about thermodynamics and the theories, I dont know what to apply or where to apply it when I see a calculation heavy word problem. Also, what kinds of equations can you put in your binder that are not the very basic ones? Every time I see a new test there are new equations used that I have never even heard of.

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1523
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Studying Question

Post by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » February 24th, 2019, 1:03 pm

varshahark wrote:I usually struggle with long word problems on topics such as energy (just word problems in general I guess). For example: The outdoor temperature is Boston during winter is -10.0 ̊C. Since the wall and theroof of the house are relatively thin (0.500 m), there will be a loss of energy, which isreleased to the surrounding (neglect the heat transferred to the water and to/throughthe ground). The heat conductivity of the wall and roof is 1.00 W K​-1​ m​-1​. Calculatethe energy (in MJ) that is needed to maintain the indoor temperature for 1 day (24.0h). (7 pt)

That is a question taken from an invitational test and although I have learned about thermodynamics and the theories, I dont know what to apply or where to apply it when I see a calculation heavy word problem. Also, what kinds of equations can you put in your binder that are not the very basic ones? Every time I see a new test there are new equations used that I have never even heard of.
Do you know the ideal gas law, the concept of specific and latent heat, what thermal conductivity is, what internal energy is and how to find it for different types of gases, and enthalpy and entropy if you're in C division, etc. etc.

This problem can be solved using an equation involving conductivity if you're given the indoor temperature. Make sure you know what all the units mean.

C8H10N4O2!
Member
Member
Posts: 44
Joined: October 4th, 2018, 3:55 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Studying Question

Post by C8H10N4O2! » February 25th, 2019, 3:14 am

varshahark wrote:I usually struggle with long word problems on topics such as energy (just word problems in general I guess). For example: The outdoor temperature is Boston during winter is -10.0 ̊C. Since the wall and theroof of the house are relatively thin (0.500 m), there will be a loss of energy, which isreleased to the surrounding (neglect the heat transferred to the water and to/throughthe ground). The heat conductivity of the wall and roof is 1.00 W K​-1​ m​-1​. Calculatethe energy (in MJ) that is needed to maintain the indoor temperature for 1 day (24.0h). (7 pt)

That is a question taken from an invitational test and although I have learned about thermodynamics and the theories, I dont know what to apply or where to apply it when I see a calculation heavy word problem. Also, what kinds of equations can you put in your binder that are not the very basic ones? Every time I see a new test there are new equations used that I have never even heard of.
I would look at this invitational's answer key--they explained everything pretty well and it may help you.

Locked

Return to “Thermodynamics B/C”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest