Circuit Lab B/C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
User avatar
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1082
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Location: (0, 0)
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » October 11th, 2018, 4:40 pm

MattChina wrote:What is the difference of total resistance of a circuit with 3 resistors of 6 ohms each arranged in a series vs parallel?

Answer
Series: 18 ohms, Parallel: 2 ohms

MattChina
Member
Member
Posts: 176
Joined: February 12th, 2017, 8:06 am
Division: B
State: NY
Location: somewhere over the rainbow
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby MattChina » October 11th, 2018, 4:44 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
MattChina wrote:What is the difference of total resistance of a circuit with 3 resistors of 6 ohms each arranged in a series vs parallel?

Answer
Series: 18 ohms, Parallel: 2 ohms

yep
Physics is my city

2017 events: Hovercraft, Ecology, Optics, Write it do it, Fast Facts, Mystery Design(NY trial)
2018 events: Hovercraft, Ecology, Optics, Thermodynamics, Quiz bowl(NY trial)

Ankles moister than a humid summer day

Jacobi
Member
Member
Posts: 137
Joined: September 4th, 2018, 7:47 am
State: -
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby Jacobi » October 11th, 2018, 5:02 pm

MattChina wrote:What is the difference of total resistance of a circuit with 3 resistors of 6 ohms each arranged in a series vs parallel?


Well, it depends.

Answer 1
The resistance in series is 18 ohms (sum). The resistance in parallel is 2 ohms ( ). The difference is 16 ohms.


Answer 2
When resistors are placed in series, the electrons have to go through multiple blockages to complete the circuit. Thus, the total resistance is greater. When resistors are placed in parallel, the electrons have multiple pathways, and thus they encounter less overall resistance.


Take your pick.

MattChina
Member
Member
Posts: 176
Joined: February 12th, 2017, 8:06 am
Division: B
State: NY
Location: somewhere over the rainbow
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby MattChina » October 11th, 2018, 5:03 pm

Jacobi wrote:
MattChina wrote:What is the difference of total resistance of a circuit with 3 resistors of 6 ohms each arranged in a series vs parallel?


Well, it depends.

Answer 1
The resistance in series is 18 ohms (sum). The resistance in parallel is 2 ohms ( ). The difference is 16 ohms.


Answer 2
When resistors are placed in series, the electrons have to go through multiple blockages to complete the circuit. Thus, the total resistance is greater. When resistors are placed in parallel, the electrons have multiple pathways, and thus they encounter less overall resistance.


Take your pick.

Questions was already answered
Physics is my city

2017 events: Hovercraft, Ecology, Optics, Write it do it, Fast Facts, Mystery Design(NY trial)
2018 events: Hovercraft, Ecology, Optics, Thermodynamics, Quiz bowl(NY trial)

Ankles moister than a humid summer day

Jacobi
Member
Member
Posts: 137
Joined: September 4th, 2018, 7:47 am
State: -
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby Jacobi » October 11th, 2018, 5:05 pm

MattChina wrote:
Jacobi wrote:
MattChina wrote:What is the difference of total resistance of a circuit with 3 resistors of 6 ohms each arranged in a series vs parallel?


Well, it depends.

Answer 1
The resistance in series is 18 ohms (sum). The resistance in parallel is 2 ohms ( ). The difference is 16 ohms.


Answer 2
When resistors are placed in series, the electrons have to go through multiple blockages to complete the circuit. Thus, the total resistance is greater. When resistors are placed in parallel, the electrons have multiple pathways, and thus they encounter less overall resistance.


Take your pick.

Questions was already answered

Sorry.

User avatar
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1082
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Location: (0, 0)
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » October 11th, 2018, 5:34 pm

Give a real-world function of a capacitor.

User avatar
PM2017
Member
Member
Posts: 394
Joined: January 20th, 2017, 5:02 pm
Division: C
State: CA
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby PM2017 » October 11th, 2018, 6:10 pm

MattChina wrote:What is the difference of total resistance of a circuit with 3 resistors of 6 ohms each arranged in a series vs parallel?

attempt
6*3 ohms - (3(1/6))^(-1) ohms = 18 ohms - 2 ohms 16 ohms
2018 Events
Astronomy, Mousetrap Vehicle, Mission Possible, Fermi Questions

2019 Events
Astronomy, Mousetrap Vehicle, Mission Possible, Fermi Questions, Circuit Lab

--
West High School Science Olympiad

MattChina
Member
Member
Posts: 176
Joined: February 12th, 2017, 8:06 am
Division: B
State: NY
Location: somewhere over the rainbow
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby MattChina » October 11th, 2018, 7:18 pm

PM2017 wrote:
MattChina wrote:What is the difference of total resistance of a circuit with 3 resistors of 6 ohms each arranged in a series vs parallel?

attempt
6*3 ohms - (3(1/6))^(-1) ohms = 18 ohms - 2 ohms 16 ohms

Question was already answered and there is a new question up but yes that is correct
Physics is my city

2017 events: Hovercraft, Ecology, Optics, Write it do it, Fast Facts, Mystery Design(NY trial)
2018 events: Hovercraft, Ecology, Optics, Thermodynamics, Quiz bowl(NY trial)

Ankles moister than a humid summer day

User avatar
mdv2o5
Member
Member
Posts: 8
Joined: July 9th, 2018, 7:24 am
Division: Grad
State: IN
Location: MA
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby mdv2o5 » October 12th, 2018, 6:10 am

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Give a real-world function of a capacitor.

Answer
FULL BRIDGE RECTIFIER ... or pretty much any rectifier that turns AC into DC (e.g. switching power supplies).


If the above answer is acceptable, what does it mean for breakdown to occur in a pn junction?

User avatar
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1082
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Location: (0, 0)
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » October 12th, 2018, 2:20 pm

mdv2o5 wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Give a real-world function of a capacitor.

Answer
FULL BRIDGE RECTIFIER ... or pretty much any rectifier that turns AC into DC (e.g. switching power supplies).


If the above answer is acceptable, what does it mean for breakdown to occur in a pn junction?

Yep.

Answer
Breakdown is a rapid increase in reverse current past the maximum voltage in reverse biased conditions

User avatar
mdv2o5
Member
Member
Posts: 8
Joined: July 9th, 2018, 7:24 am
Division: Grad
State: IN
Location: MA
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby mdv2o5 » October 15th, 2018, 6:16 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Yep.

Answer
Breakdown is a rapid increase in reverse current past the maximum voltage in reverse biased conditions


Looks good! Zener and Avalanche breakdown might also be good things to look up just in case.

User avatar
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1082
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Location: (0, 0)
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » October 15th, 2018, 6:39 pm

mdv2o5 wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Yep.

Answer
Breakdown is a rapid increase in reverse current past the maximum voltage in reverse biased conditions


Looks good! Zener and Avalanche breakdown might also be good things to look up just in case.

All right, great!

What is the RMS voltage of a sinusoidal wave alternating between 40 and -40 V? Why is this useful? How does this change if you consider a square wave which is 40 V half of the time and -40 V the other half?

Jacobi
Member
Member
Posts: 137
Joined: September 4th, 2018, 7:47 am
State: -
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby Jacobi » October 22nd, 2018, 4:30 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
mdv2o5 wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Yep.

Answer
Breakdown is a rapid increase in reverse current past the maximum voltage in reverse biased conditions


Looks good! Zener and Avalanche breakdown might also be good things to look up just in case.

All right, great!

What is the RMS voltage of a sinusoidal wave alternating between 40 and -40 V? Why is this useful? How does this change if you consider a square wave which is 40 V half of the time and -40 V the other half?

You know, we don't need to know AC.
Answer
. This number is the DC equivalent of an AC current. A square wave's RMS is 40 V.

User avatar
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1082
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Location: (0, 0)
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » October 22nd, 2018, 5:33 pm

Jacobi wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
mdv2o5 wrote:
Looks good! Zener and Avalanche breakdown might also be good things to look up just in case.

All right, great!

What is the RMS voltage of a sinusoidal wave alternating between 40 and -40 V? Why is this useful? How does this change if you consider a square wave which is 40 V half of the time and -40 V the other half?

You know, we don't need to know AC.
Answer
. This number is the DC equivalent of an AC current. A square wave's RMS is 40 V.

That's not true.
But yep, your turn.

Jacobi
Member
Member
Posts: 137
Joined: September 4th, 2018, 7:47 am
State: -
Contact:

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Postby Jacobi » October 23rd, 2018, 7:14 am

Choose one famous circuit scientist and list his major accomplishment.


Return to “Question Marathons”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron