Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
MaanMaan
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby MaanMaan » October 9th, 2018, 8:40 pm

Ahhh didnt mean to assume gender
I'm Sryyy

Answers
Avg Resting Heart Rate 80 bpm
As athletes mature they begin to have a greater Stroke per Volume (Oxygen per Beat), hence they need fewer beats to maintain their resting heart rate because the Stroke per volume remains the same.

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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby Anomaly » October 10th, 2018, 6:26 pm

MaanMaan wrote:
Answers
Avg Resting Heart Rate 80 bpm
As athletes mature they begin to have a greater Stroke per Volume (Oxygen per Beat), hence they need fewer beats to maintain their resting heart rate because the Stroke per volume remains the same.

Looks good to me, though I thought I read somewhere that the average resting heart rate for an adult is about 72bpm Your turn!
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MaanMaan
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby MaanMaan » October 10th, 2018, 7:03 pm

Well personally I just average the two most seen rates
Two Rates
60 and 100 bpm averaged to 80 idek lol



Anyways Questions:

What tool do you use to measure systolic and diastolic pressure?
How do you find each?

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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby linzhiyan » October 11th, 2018, 8:07 pm

MaanMaan wrote:Well personally I just average the two most seen rates
Two Rates
60 and 100 bpm averaged to 80 idek lol



Anyways Questions:

What tool do you use to measure systolic and diastolic pressure?
How do you find each?


I'm not sure if this is what you're looking for, but:
1) sphygmomanometer
2) Wrap sphygmomanometer on a person's upper arm and place a stethoscope where you can hear their pulse. Inflate the sphygmomanometer until you cannot hear the pulse. Deflate slowly. The number that is shown on the sphygmomanometer when you can hear the pulse again is the systolic pressure. Keep on deflating until you cannot hear the pulse again. That number on the sphygmomanometer is their diastolic pressure.
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby MaanMaan » October 12th, 2018, 4:37 pm

Yep that is right

You're turn

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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby linzhiyan » October 12th, 2018, 10:11 pm

What is the primary function of the lymphatic system?
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby jxxu20 » October 13th, 2018, 12:19 pm

The primary function of the lymphatic system is to transport lymph, a fluid containing leukocytes and lymphocytes (cells that fight infection) throughout the body. It also absorbs interstitial fluid and transports it back to the circulatory system, and helps with fat absorption in the small intestine (fatty lymph = chyle).
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby linzhiyan » October 13th, 2018, 2:53 pm

jxxu20 wrote:The primary function of the lymphatic system is to transport lymph, a fluid containing leukocytes and lymphocytes (cells that fight infection) throughout the body. It also absorbs interstitial fluid and transports it back to the circulatory system, and helps with fat absorption in the small intestine (fatty lymph = chyle).

Yep, ya got it!
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby jxxu20 » October 14th, 2018, 6:18 am

Questions:
1. A man with a blood type genotype of iBi marries a woman with a genotype of iAiA. The man does not have the Rh factor whereas the woman is heterozygous for the Rh factor. What percent of their children will have type A blood and be Rh positive?

2. Explain RAG1 and RAG2's roles in T cell development.

3. Where does the thoracic duct empty lymph into?

4. What is the difference between a centroblast and a centrocyte?
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby ZGMFX10AFreedom » October 19th, 2018, 1:48 pm

Sorry, don't mind this. Accident.

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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby platypusomelette » October 20th, 2018, 10:51 am

Just to add onto jxxu's questions since I got the renal half of the event. wheres all the love for kidneys my dudes
1. List these nephron components in order: descending limb, bowman's capsule, distal convoluted tube, proximal convoluted tube, ascending limb, collecting duct
2. List these kidney arteries in order: arcuate artery, renal artery, interlobar artery, cortical radiate artery, afferent arteriole, efferent arteriole, segmental artery
3. What is the name of the capillaries in bowman's capsule?
5. What's the name of the capillaries around the loop of henle?
6. What is the muscle that controls contraction in the bladder?
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby isotelus » November 3rd, 2018, 9:47 pm

1. 50%

2. They initiate V(D)J recombination, which causes much greater diversity in the range of defenses against harmful microbes. It is a necessary step in the maturation of pre T cells.

3. left brachiocephalic vein

4. centroblast: enlargened, activated B cell
centrocyte: B cell with a dent in the nucleus

1. Bowman's capsule, PCT, descending limb, ascending limb (DL and AL make up loop of Henle), PCT, collecting duct
2. renal artery, segmental artery, arcuate artery, cortical radiate artery, afferent arteriole, efferent arteriole, interlobar artery,
3. Glomerulus
4. peritubular capillaries
5. detrusor muscle, activated by micturition reflex
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby jxxu20 » November 5th, 2018, 2:33 pm

The answers to my questions were correct for the most part, but be careful and check number 1.

This is a dihybrid cross -- there is a 50% or 1/2 chance of the children being type AB and 50% chance of them being type A(O). Crossing the alleles for Rh factor, we see that 50% (1/2) of the children will have a genotype of Dd (heterozygous, meaning that they have the Rh factor) while 50% (1/2) are homozygous recessive (dd, meaning that they are Rh negative). 1/2 AO * 1/2 Rh+ = 1/4 type A blood and Rh positive. Therefore, the correct answer should be 25%.
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby isotelus » November 5th, 2018, 9:43 pm

Ok, nice to know.

1. Describe 3 symptoms of Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

2. What is lymph called prior to being collected by lymphatic vessels?

3. State what happens in the red pulp of the spleen.
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby AarushMehta » November 10th, 2018, 3:46 am

isotelus wrote:Ok, nice to know.

1. Describe 3 symptoms of Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

2. What is lymph called prior to being collected by lymphatic vessels?

3. State what happens in the red pulp of the spleen.


Answer
1. Drowsiness, fever, and swollen lymph nodes.
2. Extracellular fluid.
3. Blood is being filtered of old/damaged red blood cells.
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