Anatomy and Physiology B/C

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Mr.Epithelium
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by Mr.Epithelium » February 19th, 2020, 7:43 pm

donutsandcupcakes wrote:
February 19th, 2020, 7:18 pm
Sorry for interrupting, but how are these questions for division B, I feel very unprepared
Don't be discouraged by the terminology and questions! This question marathon can have some pretty good stuff. Disease questions (like treatment, diagnosis, etc) in anatomy can be some of the harder questions that are asked, as it is very open-ended. In the case that you don't know a whole lot about them, study them one by one in-depth using sources like Mayo Clinic or I daresay Wikipedia.
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by reninkidney » February 19th, 2020, 7:53 pm

Image

1. What type of cartilage is this and where is it commonly found?

2. Name the origin and insertion of the triceps brachii.

3. Bob loves spending time in the Sun. Recently, he has observed that a mole on his palm has started growing. It is greater than 0.24 inches, is elevated and very firm. What disease does he have? (State the specific subtype)
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by Locoholic » February 20th, 2020, 4:32 pm

reninkidney wrote:
February 19th, 2020, 7:53 pm
Image

1. What type of cartilage is this and where is it commonly found?

2. Name the origin and insertion of the triceps brachii.

3. Bob loves spending time in the Sun. Recently, he has observed that a mole on his palm has started growing. It is greater than 0.24 inches, is elevated and very firm. What disease does he have? (State the specific subtype)
1. Hyaline, commonly found in joints. 2. Not sure how specific you want, but the origin is the infraglenoid tubercule of the scapula and the insertion is the olecranon process of the ulna (had to look at cheat sheet for specifics). 3. I'd think it's malignant melanoma, probably the nodular type.
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by reninkidney » February 20th, 2020, 5:34 pm

Locoholic wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 4:32 pm
reninkidney wrote:
February 19th, 2020, 7:53 pm
Image

1. What type of cartilage is this and where is it commonly found?

2. Name the origin and insertion of the triceps brachii.

3. Bob loves spending time in the Sun. Recently, he has observed that a mole on his palm has started growing. It is greater than 0.24 inches, is elevated and very firm. What disease does he have? (State the specific subtype)
1. Hyaline, commonly found in joints. 2. Not sure how specific you want, but the origin is the infraglenoid tubercule of the scapula and the insertion is the olecranon process of the ulna (had to look at cheat sheet for specifics). 3. I'd think it's malignant melanoma, probably the nodular type.
All correct, but for number 2: That was just the origin of the long head. The origin of the lateral head is the upper half posterior humerus and the medial head is deep on lower half posterior humerus inferomedial to spiral groove and both intermuscular septa.
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by Locoholic » February 21st, 2020, 11:09 am

reninkidney wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 5:34 pm

All correct, but for number 2: That was just the origin of the long head. The origin of the lateral head is the upper half posterior humerus and the medial head is deep on lower half posterior humerus inferomedial to spiral groove and both intermuscular septa.
Good to know.

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1) What vertebra is pictured above?

2) A typical lumbar vertebra has…
a) A short, rounded spinous process.
b) A bifid spinous process.
c) Articulation sites for ribs.
d) transverse foramen.

3) How do the forms (shapes) of different vertebrae relate to their respective functions? (cervical, thoracic, lumbar)
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by paschw30 » February 21st, 2020, 11:37 am

1. atlas (C1)
2. a.
3. Cervical are small because they don't need to support much weight. Atlas and axis are very specialized for nodding and shaking your head no. Thoracic are larger and have facets for articulation with ribs. Lumbar are the largest with a large, thick body to support a lot of weight.

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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by Locoholic » February 22nd, 2020, 6:11 am

paschw30 wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 11:37 am
1. atlas (C1)
2. a.
3. Cervical are small because they don't need to support much weight. Atlas and axis are very specialized for nodding and shaking your head no. Thoracic are larger and have facets for articulation with ribs. Lumbar are the largest with a large, thick body to support a lot of weight.
All good, your turn!
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by reninkidney » February 22nd, 2020, 9:24 pm

Image

1. Label this bone:

2. What is the oxygen debt?

3. What do Pacinian corpuscles sense?
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by Locoholic » February 23rd, 2020, 6:13 am

reninkidney wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 9:24 pm
Image

1. Label this bone:

2. What is the oxygen debt?

3. What do Pacinian corpuscles sense?
1. A - Clavicular Notch, B - Costal Notches, C - Xiphoid Process, D - Body, E - Sternal Angle, F - Manubrium, G - Jugular Notch 2. It's basically a deficit of oxygen after strenuous (anaerobic) exercise, due to a build-up of lactic acid levels. 3. Constantly changing deep touch.
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by reninkidney » February 23rd, 2020, 10:17 am

Locoholic wrote:
February 23rd, 2020, 6:13 am
reninkidney wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 9:24 pm
Image

1. Label this bone:

2. What is the oxygen debt?

3. What do Pacinian corpuscles sense?
1. A - Clavicular Notch, B - Costal Notches, C - Xiphoid Process, D - Body, E - Sternal Angle, F - Manubrium, G - Jugular Notch 2. It's basically a deficit of oxygen after strenuous (anaerobic) exercise, due to a build-up of lactic acid levels. 3. Constantly changing deep touch.
All correct but for number 3, Pacinian corpuscles sense pressure and vibration. Your turn!
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