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Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: December 8th, 2020, 9:39 am
by azboy1910
ThomasL wrote:
December 5th, 2020, 6:34 pm
1. (assuming 2 sigfigs) 3.5e11 J/m^3
2. Overheats and burns up?
3. V3 = 10 V, V4 = 7.5 V
First circuit question marathon :D Hope that's right.
All good! Your turn!

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: January 29th, 2021, 10:26 am
by ThomasL
Left this thread hanging for a while :( So here are some more questions:
1. Explain what a Zener diode is and how it's used.
2. How many NAND gates are required to make a NOT gate? A NOR gate? An XOR gate?
3. What is the peak-to-peak voltage of USA AC electricity?

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: February 9th, 2021, 12:44 pm
by azboy1910
ThomasL wrote:
January 29th, 2021, 10:26 am
Left this thread hanging for a while :( So here are some more questions:
1. Explain what a Zener diode is and how it's used.
2. How many NAND gates are required to make a NOT gate? A NOR gate? An XOR gate?
3. What is the peak-to-peak voltage of USA AC electricity?
1. A zener diode is a diode designed to operate and experience breakdown at a specific reverse voltage, when current starts flowing through the diode in reverse bias.
2. It takes 1 NAND gate to make a NOT gate, 4 NAND gates to make a NOR gate and 4 NAND gates to make a XOR gate.
3. The peak-to-peak voltage in US households is 340 V.

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: February 9th, 2021, 5:28 pm
by ThomasL
azboy1910 wrote:
February 9th, 2021, 12:44 pm
ThomasL wrote:
January 29th, 2021, 10:26 am
Left this thread hanging for a while :( So here are some more questions:
1. Explain what a Zener diode is and how it's used.
2. How many NAND gates are required to make a NOT gate? A NOR gate? An XOR gate?
3. What is the peak-to-peak voltage of USA AC electricity?
1. A zener diode is a diode designed to operate and experience breakdown at a specific reverse voltage, when current starts flowing through the diode in reverse bias.
2. It takes 1 NAND gate to make a NOT gate, 4 NAND gates to make a NOR gate and 4 NAND gates to make a XOR gate.
3. The peak-to-peak voltage in US households is 340 V.
Looks good!! Your turn!

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: February 11th, 2021, 8:35 pm
by azboy1910
Ok, here are some easy ones since I can't think of any hard ones:

1) What direction do electric field lines created by a stationary proton point?
2) Do ferromagnetic metals retain their magnetic property? If not, state what needs to happen for its magnetic property to be "activated."
3) An ideal diode connected to a 5 V battery in reverse bias will receive how much current and how much voltage?

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: February 22nd, 2021, 9:12 am
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
azboy1910 wrote:
February 11th, 2021, 8:35 pm
Ok, here are some easy ones since I can't think of any hard ones:

1) What direction do electric field lines created by a stationary proton point?
2) Do ferromagnetic metals retain their magnetic property? If not, state what needs to happen for its magnetic property to be "activated."
3) An ideal diode connected to a 5 V battery in reverse bias will receive how much current and how much voltage?
These are pretty hard for easy questions haha
1) Radially outwards
2) Yes
3) 0, 0

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: February 22nd, 2021, 9:28 am
by azboy1910
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
February 22nd, 2021, 9:12 am
azboy1910 wrote:
February 11th, 2021, 8:35 pm
Ok, here are some easy ones since I can't think of any hard ones:

1) What direction do electric field lines created by a stationary proton point?
2) Do ferromagnetic metals retain their magnetic property? If not, state what needs to happen for its magnetic property to be "activated."
3) An ideal diode connected to a 5 V battery in reverse bias will receive how much current and how much voltage?
These are pretty hard for easy questions haha
1) Radially outwards
2) Yes
3) 0, 0
I could be wrong too obviously, but:
 1. Correct 
2. Ferromagnetic metals do not retain their magnetic property. An external magnetic field must be applied to them in order for its magnetic properties to show. 
3. An ideal diode acts as a resistor with infinite resistance in reverse bias. So yes, no current flows through the diode, but there is still 5 V across the diode. Instead of using 0 as the current, even though it is technically 0, I like to represent the current as (5/infinity) to better understand this. Multiply the current by the infinite resistance, and you get 5 V. 
Your turn!

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: February 22nd, 2021, 9:36 am
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
azboy1910 wrote:
February 22nd, 2021, 9:28 am
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
February 22nd, 2021, 9:12 am
azboy1910 wrote:
February 11th, 2021, 8:35 pm
Ok, here are some easy ones since I can't think of any hard ones:

1) What direction do electric field lines created by a stationary proton point?
2) Do ferromagnetic metals retain their magnetic property? If not, state what needs to happen for its magnetic property to be "activated."
3) An ideal diode connected to a 5 V battery in reverse bias will receive how much current and how much voltage?
These are pretty hard for easy questions haha
1) Radially outwards
2) Yes
3) 0, 0
I could be wrong too obviously, but:
 1. Correct 
2. Ferromagnetic metals do not retain their magnetic property. An external magnetic field must be applied to them in order for its magnetic properties to show. 
3. An ideal diode acts as a resistor with infinite resistance in reverse bias. So yes, no current flows through the diode, but there is still 5 V across the diode. Instead of using 0 as the current, even though it is technically 0, I like to represent the current as (5/infinity) to better understand this. Multiply the current by the infinite resistance, and you get 5 V. 
Your turn!
I think ferromagnetic materials display permanent magnetism?
What's the drift speed in a copper wire that has an electron density of and a diameter of 3 mm, with a current of 55 mA? Give your final answer to at least two significant figures.

Re: Circuit Lab B/C

Posted: February 22nd, 2021, 9:55 am
by azboy1910
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
February 22nd, 2021, 9:36 am
azboy1910 wrote:
February 22nd, 2021, 9:28 am
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
February 22nd, 2021, 9:12 am


These are pretty hard for easy questions haha
1) Radially outwards
2) Yes
3) 0, 0
I could be wrong too obviously, but:
 1. Correct 
2. Ferromagnetic metals do not retain their magnetic property. An external magnetic field must be applied to them in order for its magnetic properties to show. 
3. An ideal diode acts as a resistor with infinite resistance in reverse bias. So yes, no current flows through the diode, but there is still 5 V across the diode. Instead of using 0 as the current, even though it is technically 0, I like to represent the current as (5/infinity) to better understand this. Multiply the current by the infinite resistance, and you get 5 V. 
Your turn!
I think ferromagnetic materials display permanent magnetism?
Sorry yeah, after external magnetic field is applied it retains magnetism I believe, I should've been more specific in the question because I was referring to before an external magnetic field is applied.
Anyway, the next question was:

What's the drift speed in a copper wire that has an electron density of and a diameter of 3 mm, with a current of 55 mA? Give your final answer to at least two significant figures.