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Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 24th, 2018, 8:01 pm
by Araluen
Like someone else earlier i have been put on a flying event for the first time this year. I was reading through the rules and other outside sources...everyone keeps talking about this action of trimming a plane. What does that mean? From what i've understood, trimming is used to modify the path the actual device will fly through the use of practice flights but i'm not 100% sure.

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 24th, 2018, 8:11 pm
by Unome
Araluen wrote:Like someone else earlier i have been put on a flying event for the first time this year. I was reading through the rules and other outside sources...everyone keeps talking about this action of trimming a plane. What does that mean? From what i've understood, trimming is used to modify the path the actual device will fly through the use of practice flights but i'm not 100% sure.
Your understanding is generally accurate. I'm not knowledgeable on the details.

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 25th, 2018, 5:50 am
by CrayolaCrayon
Araluen wrote:Like someone else earlier i have been put on a flying event for the first time this year. I was reading through the rules and other outside sources...everyone keeps talking about this action of trimming a plane. What does that mean? From what i've understood, trimming is used to modify the path the actual device will fly through the use of practice flights but i'm not 100% sure.

Yes; building an amazing airplane will only get you so far. You have to trim by doing multiple test flights, testing one variable at a time (which can be the rudder, wing, where you put clay if applicable, or most importantly, rubber). Of course, there are many more things you can trim, but those were the biggest things I've trimmed over the years. Most of the things on your airplane can be trimmed if you stay within the competition dimensions. You're just changing things on your airplane to the best you can make them within competition standards.

I can not stress enough. KEEP A GOOD FLIGHT LOG. The goal of this event is to learn by testing and seeing what works. From flying events, I can definitely take away that keeping a detailed legit flight log was what led to the greatest advancements in my flying.

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 25th, 2018, 6:07 am
by bjt4888
Araluen,

Welcome to Wright Stuff. When I was a new coach to this event six years ago, in order to quickly absorb the concepts to add to my 50 year’s experience with indoor model airplanes, I read all past year’s forum posts. You will findthat this does not take as long as it sounds as you will see pretty quickly that most “pages” of posts contain only one or a few substantive posts from those experienced with the event.

I and a number of other experienced model airplane flyers, coaches and students have posted in previous year’s WS forums a significant amount of info about building, trimming, rubber and prop selection and modification; including pictures.

Of course, continue to post questions here for assistance. Good luck and have fun with aerospace engineering.

Brian T
AMA since 1968 ( off and on)

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 25th, 2018, 9:15 pm
by jlordhe
Wright Stuff sounds interesting, but my building skills suck...rip

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 26th, 2018, 6:29 am
by bjt4888
jlordhe,

Pretty much every step for constructing Wright Stuff can be supported and aligned with the flat building surface, pins or pin blocks or simple jigs.

I would encourage you to give it a try. If you build the Freedom Flight kit, the instructions describe and picture the steps showing how to support the structures as you build.

Brian T.

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 28th, 2018, 12:29 pm
by DarkSparklyUnicorn
How do you all transport your planes? I have been using cardboard chip boxes (30 pack lays) with supports for the past few years of helicopter, but I'm not sure that they are appropriate for wright stuff. I have seen the f1d style travel boxes, but I do not have the tools to make something with that level of woodworking. Pictures of your solutions would be appreciated.

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 28th, 2018, 3:09 pm
by bernard
DarkSparklyUnicorn wrote:How do you all transport your planes? I have been using cardboard chip boxes (30 pack lays) with supports for the past few years of helicopter, but I'm not sure that they are appropriate for wright stuff. I have seen the f1d style travel boxes, but I do not have the tools to make something with that level of woodworking. Pictures of your solutions would be appreciated.
Try plastic underbed storage containers. They work well if your wing can detach from the fuselage. Planes are light enough that nothing should damage even if unsecured if only planes are stored in the box.

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 28th, 2018, 6:02 pm
by DarkSparklyUnicorn
bernard wrote:
DarkSparklyUnicorn wrote:How do you all transport your planes? I have been using cardboard chip boxes (30 pack lays) with supports for the past few years of helicopter, but I'm not sure that they are appropriate for wright stuff. I have seen the f1d style travel boxes, but I do not have the tools to make something with that level of woodworking. Pictures of your solutions would be appreciated.
Try plastic underbed storage containers. They work well if your wing can detach from the fuselage. Planes are light enough that nothing should damage even if unsecured if only planes are stored in the box.
Most of those types of boxes are too short at the bottom to store my motor stick and tailboom. I guess I'll need to learn to roll motor sticks and tailbooms to make them detachable.

Re: Wright Stuff C

Posted: September 28th, 2018, 6:43 pm
by coachchuckaahs
We use a larger plastic tote (clear) that fit the plane assembled. Of course, that means we drive to the events, not fly. I use Goop glue to put in some EPP foam blocks (like computer stuff is packed with), with slots to support the motor stick. We have not broken anything this way in transport, and the planes are ready to fly, trimmed out, upon arrival. We keep the planes in the box except for the one flying (the box holds 2) when practicing, to avoid the unfortunate crash damage when the flying one hits the one on the bench (ask me why...).

Coach Chuck