Wright Stuff C

coachchuckaahs
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby coachchuckaahs » June 3rd, 2019, 8:25 am

Yes, that drift was strong, especially when the crowd was large. Human induced thermals!

Coach Chuck
Coach, Albuquerque Area Home Schoolers Flying Events
Nationals Results:
2016 C WS 8th place
2018 B WS 2nd place
2018 C Heli Champion
2019 B ELG 3rd place
2019 C WS Champion
AMA Results: 2 AAHS members qualify for US Jr Team in F1D

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CrayolaCrayon
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby CrayolaCrayon » June 3rd, 2019, 8:29 am

If you played your cards right, you could actually ride the thermals to keep the plane up in the air up longer, especially with those hot lights up top.

The net lowering and raising seemed to cause drifts towards it, as well.
Wright Stuff National Runner-up 2019
USA F1D Team 2020

coachchuckaahs
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby coachchuckaahs » June 3rd, 2019, 8:49 am

Not sure how to "play cards right" in this case. Air was going up over people, across the ceiling, then down near nets. This circulation moves a plane up top toward the nets, and more importantly, toward the downward motion. Ideally you would launch in neutral, or even in the downdraft, to absorb the launch torque. You would then want to drift to the updraft for the letdown, so the updraft helps your letdown last longer. However, since the drift is a function of the updraft, it is always AWAY from the updraft. The upward moving air must go somewhere! Therefore, I don't know how you could get your letdown centered on the updraft.

Coach Chuck
Coach, Albuquerque Area Home Schoolers Flying Events
Nationals Results:
2016 C WS 8th place
2018 B WS 2nd place
2018 C Heli Champion
2019 B ELG 3rd place
2019 C WS Champion
AMA Results: 2 AAHS members qualify for US Jr Team in F1D

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CrayolaCrayon
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby CrayolaCrayon » June 3rd, 2019, 9:21 am

Not sure how to "play cards right" in this case. Air was going up over people, across the ceiling, then down near nets. This circulation moves a plane up top toward the nets, and more importantly, toward the downward motion. Ideally you would launch in neutral, or even in the downdraft, to absorb the launch torque. You would then want to drift to the updraft for the letdown, so the updraft helps your letdown last longer. However, since the drift is a function of the updraft, it is always AWAY from the updraft. The upward moving air must go somewhere! Therefore, I don't know how you could get your letdown centered on the updraft.

Coach Chuck
On my first flight, it seemed when the plane was in the center, the plane kept getting pushed up on the descent. Was just odd. If it was just me disregard my comments.
Wright Stuff National Runner-up 2019
USA F1D Team 2020

coachchuckaahs
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby coachchuckaahs » June 3rd, 2019, 9:34 am

Not sure how to "play cards right" in this case. Air was going up over people, across the ceiling, then down near nets. This circulation moves a plane up top toward the nets, and more importantly, toward the downward motion. Ideally you would launch in neutral, or even in the downdraft, to absorb the launch torque. You would then want to drift to the updraft for the letdown, so the updraft helps your letdown last longer. However, since the drift is a function of the updraft, it is always AWAY from the updraft. The upward moving air must go somewhere! Therefore, I don't know how you could get your letdown centered on the updraft.

Coach Chuck
On my first flight, it seemed when the plane was in the center, the plane kept getting pushed up on the descent. Was just odd. If it was just me disregard my comments.
It is quite possible that the air currents were different. Since we flew early in the day, and you few late. If there were localized thermals, it is possible you flew in and out and could take advantage. In our case there was a strong drift across at the top, but not at mid levels. But, still, if there is an updraft, there will be a top-level drift away from the updraft, the air needs to go somewhere. If there are local circulations ( from local heat sources, like the lights), one could catch the slightly lower inward rushing air and get drawn back into the local thermal. If these were R/C or otherwise controlled, one would purposely fly it into any rising air (say, over the crowd).

Coach Chuck
Coach, Albuquerque Area Home Schoolers Flying Events
Nationals Results:
2016 C WS 8th place
2018 B WS 2nd place
2018 C Heli Champion
2019 B ELG 3rd place
2019 C WS Champion
AMA Results: 2 AAHS members qualify for US Jr Team in F1D

newflight
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby newflight » June 3rd, 2019, 9:44 am

Not sure how to "play cards right" in this case. Air was going up over people, across the ceiling, then down near nets. This circulation moves a plane up top toward the nets, and more importantly, toward the downward motion. Ideally you would launch in neutral, or even in the downdraft, to absorb the launch torque. You would then want to drift to the updraft for the letdown, so the updraft helps your letdown last longer. However, since the drift is a function of the updraft, it is always AWAY from the updraft. The upward moving air must go somewhere! Therefore, I don't know how you could get your letdown centered on the updraft.

Coach Chuck
On my first flight, it seemed when the plane was in the center, the plane kept getting pushed up on the descent. Was just odd. If it was just me disregard my comments.
It is quite possible that the air currents were different. Since we flew early in the day, and you few late. If there were localized thermals, it is possible you flew in and out and could take advantage. In our case there was a strong drift across at the top, but not at mid levels. But, still, if there is an updraft, there will be a top-level drift away from the updraft, the air needs to go somewhere. If there are local circulations ( from local heat sources, like the lights), one could catch the slightly lower inward rushing air and get drawn back into the local thermal. If these were R/C or otherwise controlled, one would purposely fly it into any rising air (say, over the crowd).

Coach Chuck
when we flew, it seems there is strong air current on top, I would say maybe above 20ft. after that, it seems to be better

ScottMaurer19
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby ScottMaurer19 » June 3rd, 2019, 10:09 am

Not sure how to "play cards right" in this case. Air was going up over people, across the ceiling, then down near nets. This circulation moves a plane up top toward the nets, and more importantly, toward the downward motion. Ideally you would launch in neutral, or even in the downdraft, to absorb the launch torque. You would then want to drift to the updraft for the letdown, so the updraft helps your letdown last longer. However, since the drift is a function of the updraft, it is always AWAY from the updraft. The upward moving air must go somewhere! Therefore, I don't know how you could get your letdown centered on the updraft.

Coach Chuck
On my first flight, it seemed when the plane was in the center, the plane kept getting pushed up on the descent. Was just odd. If it was just me disregard my comments.
It is quite possible that the air currents were different. Since we flew early in the day, and you few late. If there were localized thermals, it is possible you flew in and out and could take advantage. In our case there was a strong drift across at the top, but not at mid levels. But, still, if there is an updraft, there will be a top-level drift away from the updraft, the air needs to go somewhere. If there are local circulations ( from local heat sources, like the lights), one could catch the slightly lower inward rushing air and get drawn back into the local thermal. If these were R/C or otherwise controlled, one would purposely fly it into any rising air (say, over the crowd).

Coach Chuck
I was flying 3:20 in a 28' ceiling. Added 25 winds more than practice for a 'safe' first flight. In last session there were a lot of people watching and my plane went so high it hit the curtains a couple of times before hitting the wall, and crashing to the floor. Second flight I again flew on the opposite side of the room as the nets (where the observers were sitting) and again saw abnormal climb rate (during one part of a particular circle the plane jumped about 5' feet in height in a few seconds. Then while cruising at the top it moved all the way across the room (my circle size is approximately one of the quadrants of the room) towards the nets and at about 2:50 and ~20' the prop clipped the net. Ended with a 3:13 time and 10th place. Considering the circumstances it could've been worse, but I am still a bit disappointed in my time.

Shoutout to Brian Turnbull and Dan Simko for providing advice and helping us improve significantly in the past few weeks!
Solon '19 Captain, CWRU '23
2017 (r/s/n):
Hydro: 3/5/18
Robot Arm: na/1/1
Rocks: 1/1/1

2018 (r/s/n):
Heli: 2/1/7 
Herp: 1/4/4
Mission: 1/1/6
Rocks: 1/1/1
Eco: 6/3/9

2019 (r/s/n):
Fossils: 1/1/1
GLM: 1/1/1
Herp: 1/1/5
Mission: 1/1/3
WS: 4/1/10

Top 3 Medals: 144
Golds: 80

bjt4888
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby bjt4888 » June 3rd, 2019, 3:59 pm

Scott,

Great job in WS! Your airplane probably had 4:20 in it except for the bad luck with the curtain.

Brian T

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Nano1llus10n
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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby Nano1llus10n » June 4th, 2019, 9:18 am

Great Job to everyone! I was wondering if everyone in the top 10 could post a picture of their plane onto 2019 best of nationals page. Next year's specs will be different and hopefully, there will be an interesting bonus so the plane will have a different design.
[b]Event:[/b] MIT/R/S/N
[b]Anatomy and Physiology:[/b] 8/3/2/26
[b]Helicopters:[/b] 11/-/2/43
[b]Microbe Mission:[/b] 13/2/2/8
[b]Event:[/b] R/S/N
[b]Anatomy and Physiology:[/b] 1/2/8
[b]Designer Genes:[/b] 1/2/4
[b]Protein Modeling:[/b] 1/3/2
[b]Wright Stuff:[/b] 2/2/9


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Re: Wright Stuff C

Postby klastyioer » June 4th, 2019, 9:34 am

Great Job to everyone! I was wondering if everyone in the top 10 could post a picture of their plane onto 2019 best of nationals page. Next year's specs will be different and hopefully, there will be an interesting bonus so the plane will have a different design.
oof wish i could
it's not about the medals; go out there and have fun. make progress, learn a few things, have one heck of a time, because that's all that matters.

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'17 - Towers, WS, rocks
'18 - Towers, WS, Mystery Arch, road
'19 - WS
'20 - WS, Boomilever, PPP


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