Solar System B

bp31000
Member
Member
Posts: 57
Joined: February 20th, 2018, 7:12 am
Division: C
State: TN
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Solar System B

Post by bp31000 » March 1st, 2019, 4:49 am

fiddhantfen wrote:Resources I've found to be helpful are wikipedia (obviously), the NASA image galleries, space.com image galleries, and soinc.org, keep an eye out for practice tests.
strangely i found the space.com better at using NASA images than NASA is, it is easier to find them!
State & Regional 2019 events B
<3 Solar system, Water Quality, Anatomy and Physiology- 1st State & Regional<3
:roll: Heredity 4th state, 2nd regional :roll:

bp31000
Member
Member
Posts: 57
Joined: February 20th, 2018, 7:12 am
Division: C
State: TN
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Solar System B

Post by bp31000 » March 3rd, 2019, 4:59 pm

my regional had questions for finding orbital velocity, i know we are supposed to know Kepler's laws, but never thought we would actually have to use the math. the rules didn't even allow calculators! is such math questions something we should be expecting at state level?
State & Regional 2019 events B
<3 Solar system, Water Quality, Anatomy and Physiology- 1st State & Regional<3
:roll: Heredity 4th state, 2nd regional :roll:

User avatar
Unome
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 4250
Joined: January 26th, 2014, 12:48 pm
Division: Grad
State: GA
Location: somewhere in the sciolyverse
Has thanked: 65 times
Been thanked: 30 times

Re: Solar System B

Post by Unome » March 3rd, 2019, 6:18 pm

bp31000 wrote:my regional had questions for finding orbital velocity, i know we are supposed to know Kepler's laws, but never thought we would actually have to use the math. the rules didn't even allow calculators! is such math questions something we should be expecting at state level?
The test should not have had questions that require significant computation with Kepler's laws, although many test writers fail to notice that calculators aren't allowed and ask such questions accidentally. That said, it's possible to write simple math-based Kepler's laws questions that don't require the use of a calculator.
Userpage
Chattahoochee High School Class of 2018
Georgia Tech Class of 2022

Opinions expressed on this site are not official; the only place for official rules changes and FAQs is soinc.org.

Killboe
Member
Member
Posts: 205
Joined: January 29th, 2018, 7:04 am
Division: C
State: FL
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Solar System B

Post by Killboe » March 4th, 2019, 11:21 am

Unome wrote:
bp31000 wrote:my regional had questions for finding orbital velocity, i know we are supposed to know Kepler's laws, but never thought we would actually have to use the math. the rules didn't even allow calculators! is such math questions something we should be expecting at state level?
The test should not have had questions that require significant computation with Kepler's laws, although many test writers fail to notice that calculators aren't allowed and ask such questions accidentally. That said, it's possible to write simple math-based Kepler's laws questions that don't require the use of a calculator.
I agree with Unome. However, the math questions usually don't require calculators and are very basic.
Stanton College Preparatory

MatthewK.
Member
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: March 5th, 2019, 11:43 am
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Solar System B

Post by MatthewK. » March 5th, 2019, 11:47 am

Hey everyone! This is my first year doing Solar System. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the best places to look for information. I know that the rotation is about to end, but I still want to know as Regionals at BGSU are coming up this weekend and I don't really have a good cheat sheet. Thanks!

User avatar
space-egg
Member
Member
Posts: 29
Joined: March 5th, 2019, 11:30 am
Division: B
State: IN
Location: thomas jefferson middle school
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Solar System B

Post by space-egg » March 5th, 2019, 12:28 pm

MatthewK. wrote:Hey everyone! This is my first year doing Solar System. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the best places to look for information. I know that the rotation is about to end, but I still want to know as Regionals at BGSU are coming up this weekend and I don't really have a good cheat sheet. Thanks!

I recommend NASA, especially for the missions and dwarf planets. For things like asteroids, I used many sources.
the name's bond. covalent bond.

2019:
solar system and potions and poisons

2020:
reach for the stars, ornithology, and meteorology

2021 (hopefully):
reach for the stars, ornithology, meteorology, and something else

bp31000
Member
Member
Posts: 57
Joined: February 20th, 2018, 7:12 am
Division: C
State: TN
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Solar System B

Post by bp31000 » March 5th, 2019, 1:49 pm

MatthewK. wrote:Hey everyone! This is my first year doing Solar System. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the best places to look for information. I know that the rotation is about to end, but I still want to know as Regionals at BGSU are coming up this weekend and I don't really have a good cheat sheet. Thanks!
it is difficult to find all things in one place, even in wikipedia. Start with NASA site, also if you google individual things Eg: planetary processes, you will find some university teaching pages or pdfs also image search for important crates, mountains etc with names, you will encounter most images you are going to get in the exam.
State & Regional 2019 events B
<3 Solar system, Water Quality, Anatomy and Physiology- 1st State & Regional<3
:roll: Heredity 4th state, 2nd regional :roll:

User avatar
space-egg
Member
Member
Posts: 29
Joined: March 5th, 2019, 11:30 am
Division: B
State: IN
Location: thomas jefferson middle school
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Solar System B

Post by space-egg » March 5th, 2019, 2:27 pm

I'm working on my notes on the dwarf planets, and I can't find any resources for the sizes of Pluto and Eris. Some websites say that Eris is bigger in volume and Pluto is smaller, while others say that Pluto is larger in volume but Eris is larger in mass. Can someone please link me to solid proof? Thank you!
the name's bond. covalent bond.

2019:
solar system and potions and poisons

2020:
reach for the stars, ornithology, and meteorology

2021 (hopefully):
reach for the stars, ornithology, meteorology, and something else

Killboe
Member
Member
Posts: 205
Joined: January 29th, 2018, 7:04 am
Division: C
State: FL
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Solar System B

Post by Killboe » March 5th, 2019, 7:12 pm

space-egg wrote:I'm working on my notes on the dwarf planets, and I can't find any resources for the sizes of Pluto and Eris. Some websites say that Eris is bigger in volume and Pluto is smaller, while others say that Pluto is larger in volume but Eris is larger in mass. Can someone please link me to solid proof? Thank you!
Pluto is larger than Eris, Eris has more mass than Pluto. I don't have solid proof. But I am 100% sure on that.
Stanton College Preparatory

User avatar
space-egg
Member
Member
Posts: 29
Joined: March 5th, 2019, 11:30 am
Division: B
State: IN
Location: thomas jefferson middle school
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Solar System B

Post by space-egg » March 6th, 2019, 6:31 am

Killboe wrote:
space-egg wrote:I'm working on my notes on the dwarf planets, and I can't find any resources for the sizes of Pluto and Eris. Some websites say that Eris is bigger in volume and Pluto is smaller, while others say that Pluto is larger in volume but Eris is larger in mass. Can someone please link me to solid proof? Thank you!
Pluto is larger than Eris, Eris has more mass than Pluto. I don't have solid proof. But I am 100% sure on that.
Okay, that's what I originally thought. Thank you!
the name's bond. covalent bond.

2019:
solar system and potions and poisons

2020:
reach for the stars, ornithology, and meteorology

2021 (hopefully):
reach for the stars, ornithology, meteorology, and something else

Post Reply

Return to “2019 Study Events”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest