Solar System B

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Re: Solar System B

Post by AwersomeUser » March 31st, 2019, 11:58 am

Killboe wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
Sharan.thiru wrote: That would be like identifying what features are on the surface of the planet, what the highlighted partis made up of, or what would you expect to find in a certain part of a planet or satellite, what do certain feature in a crater look like, and stuff like that.
Oh ok. How much harder would you say state tests are? (My guess is that there will not be any mutiple choice questions and maybe more identifying type of questions.) How much time do you think I should spend preparing since my competition is next Friday (4/5)? What topics are likely be asked the most? (I mean like would the moon, pluto, or whatever be asked the most.) I am thinking about remaking my cheat sheet but I struggle to choose what to put on it...
I just took a states test (FL). The test was A M A Z I N G, everything in it was on the rule sheet. It was 170 questions, almost all was short response. As for your cheat sheet, for each celestial body I would include rotation period, orbit period, distance, internal structure, atmosphere, formation, resonance with other bodies, any unique features, eccentricity, notable geologic features, diameter, mass, size, what it's classified as, anything else really. But yeah I have that and more for each celestial body. For Oumuamua and 2007OR10 though, you will need a LOT of information. A lot of the test was identifying but for the most part it was easy, it will ask for anything and everything, so prepare. Some questions were kind of not on the rules (Vesta and 2010TK, unless I don't remember the rules). However, solar is a fairly easy event and if it's easy for you. You know that it's easy for others, so include everything. Also, on the test it was asking for surface temp a lot in Celcius, so make sure it's Celcius and not Kelvin (jokes on the test makers i knew how to convert it). Good luck at states and I wish you the best!
Oh ok thanks! But why do I need a lot info for Oumuamua and 2007 OR10?
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Re: Solar System B

Post by Killboe » March 31st, 2019, 12:23 pm

AwersomeUser wrote:
Killboe wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
Oh ok. How much harder would you say state tests are? (My guess is that there will not be any mutiple choice questions and maybe more identifying type of questions.) How much time do you think I should spend preparing since my competition is next Friday (4/5)? What topics are likely be asked the most? (I mean like would the moon, pluto, or whatever be asked the most.) I am thinking about remaking my cheat sheet but I struggle to choose what to put on it...
I just took a states test (FL). The test was A M A Z I N G, everything in it was on the rule sheet. It was 170 questions, almost all was short response. As for your cheat sheet, for each celestial body I would include rotation period, orbit period, distance, internal structure, atmosphere, formation, resonance with other bodies, any unique features, eccentricity, notable geologic features, diameter, mass, size, what it's classified as, anything else really. But yeah I have that and more for each celestial body. For Oumuamua and 2007OR10 though, you will need a LOT of information. A lot of the test was identifying but for the most part it was easy, it will ask for anything and everything, so prepare. Some questions were kind of not on the rules (Vesta and 2010TK, unless I don't remember the rules). However, solar is a fairly easy event and if it's easy for you. You know that it's easy for others, so include everything. Also, on the test it was asking for surface temp a lot in Celcius, so make sure it's Celcius and not Kelvin (jokes on the test makers i knew how to convert it). Good luck at states and I wish you the best!
Oh ok thanks! But why do I need a lot info for Oumuamua and 2007 OR10?
It states specifically in the rules "Specific details on Oumuamua and 2007 OR10"
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Re: Solar System B

Post by Killboe » March 31st, 2019, 12:23 pm

LiteralRhinoceros wrote:
Killboe wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
Oh ok. How much harder would you say state tests are? (My guess is that there will not be any mutiple choice questions and maybe more identifying type of questions.) How much time do you think I should spend preparing since my competition is next Friday (4/5)? What topics are likely be asked the most? (I mean like would the moon, pluto, or whatever be asked the most.) I am thinking about remaking my cheat sheet but I struggle to choose what to put on it...
I just took a states test (FL). The test was A M A Z I N G, everything in it was on the rule sheet. It was 170 questions, almost all was short response. As for your cheat sheet, for each celestial body I would include rotation period, orbit period, distance, internal structure, atmosphere, formation, resonance with other bodies, any unique features, eccentricity, notable geologic features, diameter, mass, size, what it's classified as, anything else really. But yeah I have that and more for each celestial body. For Oumuamua and 2007OR10 though, you will need a LOT of information. A lot of the test was identifying but for the most part it was easy, it will ask for anything and everything, so prepare. Some questions were kind of not on the rules (Vesta and 2010TK, unless I don't remember the rules). However, solar is a fairly easy event and if it's easy for you. You know that it's easy for others, so include everything. Also, on the test it was asking for surface temp a lot in Celcius, so make sure it's Celcius and not Kelvin. Good luck at states and I wish you the best!
does florida release state tests?
Sadly no, only the ones that UFSO members create are released.
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We: Sowaw System B

Post by Sharan.thiru » April 1st, 2019, 12:17 pm

Killboe wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
Sharan.thiru wrote: That wouwd be wike identifying what features awe on the surface of the Pwanet, what the highlighted partis made up of, ow what wouwd you expect to find in a certain pawt of a Pwanet ow satellite, what do certain feature in a crater wook wike, and stuff wike that.
Oh ok. How much harder wouwd you say state tests awe? (My guess is that thewe wiww not be any mutiple choice questions and maybe mowe identifying type of questions.) How much time do you think I shouwd spend preparing since my competition is next Friday (4/5)? What topics awe likely be asked the most? (I mean wike wouwd the moon, pluto, ow whatever be asked the most.) I am thinking about remaking my cheat sheet but I struggle to choose what to put on it...
I just took a states test (FL). The test was A M A Z I N G, everything in it was on the rule sheet. It was 170 questions, almost aww was short response. As fow youw cheat sheet, fow each celestial body I wouwd include rotation period, orbit period, distance, internal structure, atmosphere, formation, resonance with othew bodies, any unique features, eccentricity, notable geOwOgic features, diameter, mass, size, what it's classified as, anything else weawwy. But yeah I have that and mowe fow each celestial body. fow Oumuamua and 2007OR10 though, you wiww need a LOT of information. A lot of the test was identifying but fow the most pawt it was easy, it wiww ask fow anything and everything, so prepare. Some questions wewe kind of not on the rules (Vesta and 2010TK, unless I don't remember the rules). However, Sowaw is a fairly easy event and if it's easy fow you. You know that it's easy fow others, so include everything. Also, on the test it was asking fow surface temp a lot in Celcius, so make sure it's Celcius and not Kelvin (jokes on the test makers i knew how to convert it). Good wuck at states and I wish you the best!
That's based on the region you're in. PA is competitive but if you're in NJ, good luck kid.
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Re: We: Sowaw System B

Post by Killboe » April 1st, 2019, 12:41 pm

Sharan.thiru wrote:
Killboe wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:
Oh ok. How much harder wouwd you say state tests awe? (My guess is that thewe wiww not be any mutiple choice questions and maybe mowe identifying type of questions.) How much time do you think I shouwd spend preparing since my competition is next Friday (4/5)? What topics awe likely be asked the most? (I mean wike wouwd the moon, pluto, ow whatever be asked the most.) I am thinking about remaking my cheat sheet but I struggle to choose what to put on it...
I just took a states test (FL). The test was A M A Z I N G, everything in it was on the rule sheet. It was 170 questions, almost aww was short response. As fow youw cheat sheet, fow each celestial body I wouwd include rotation period, orbit period, distance, internal structure, atmosphere, formation, resonance with othew bodies, any unique features, eccentricity, notable geOwOgic features, diameter, mass, size, what it's classified as, anything else weawwy. But yeah I have that and mowe fow each celestial body. fow Oumuamua and 2007OR10 though, you wiww need a LOT of information. A lot of the test was identifying but fow the most pawt it was easy, it wiww ask fow anything and everything, so prepare. Some questions wewe kind of not on the rules (Vesta and 2010TK, unless I don't remember the rules). However, Sowaw is a fairly easy event and if it's easy fow you. You know that it's easy fow others, so include everything. Also, on the test it was asking fow surface temp a lot in Celcius, so make sure it's Celcius and not Kelvin (jokes on the test makers i knew how to convert it). Good wuck at states and I wish you the best!
That's based on the region you'we in. PA is competitive but if you'we in NJ, good wuck kid.
Not so much based on the region. More so based on the test makers.
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Re: Solar System B

Post by AwersomeUser » April 1st, 2019, 7:06 pm

Thanks, what should I do with preparing this type of interperting stuff:
Image
Even after looking at the answer, I am still very confused at how to read this. :o Is it likely that these kind of stuff will show up on a state test?
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Re: Solar System B

Post by Unome » April 2nd, 2019, 6:32 am

AwersomeUser wrote:Thanks, what should I do with preparing this type of interperting stuff:
Image
Even after looking at the answer, I am still very confused at how to read this. :o Is it likely that these kind of stuff will show up on a state test?
What is Φ representing here? Not knowing that means it's impossible for me to understand the graph in full, but I can tell you that the graph is a measurement of reflectivity of some surface/substance/planet-thing at various wavelengths (namely, visible to near infrared, going from left to right), with each colored line representing a different value of Φ. The four points of observation are marked with letters indicating a particular widely-recognized spectral band, since that's presumably how the measurements were done - attach a filter for the band to the observation instrument and record variations in intensity.
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Re: Solar System B

Post by Killboe » April 2nd, 2019, 11:13 am

AwersomeUser wrote:Thanks, what should I do with preparing this type of interperting stuff:
Image
Even after looking at the answer, I am still very confused at how to read this. :o Is it likely that these kind of stuff will show up on a state test?
I've never seen that on a test before. I really doubt that it'll be in a states test. So don't spend too much time on it.
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Re: Solar System B

Post by Adi1008 » April 2nd, 2019, 9:33 pm

Killboe wrote:
bp31000 wrote:
Killboe wrote:
It's right there
no, those are from UT invitational. he said he is writing the tests for their regionals for last weekend and will post them here, i am waiting for those.
My bad, I mistakened regional for invitational.
Hi everyone!

All the tournaments that were using my test finished up this weekend. You can find the exam materials (including some statistics and discussion) here!

Hopefully this helps some of you with studying, whether it's for state, nationals, or just for fun! As always, if you have any questions or feedback about the exam, feel free to let me know.
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Re: Solar System B

Post by AwersomeUser » April 3rd, 2019, 2:05 pm

Unome wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:Thanks, what should I do with preparing this type of interperting stuff:
Image
Even after looking at the answer, I am still very confused at how to read this. :o Is it likely that these kind of stuff will show up on a state test?
What is Φ representing here? Not knowing that means it's impossible for me to understand the graph in full, but I can tell you that the graph is a measurement of reflectivity of some surface/substance/planet-thing at various wavelengths (namely, visible to near infrared, going from left to right), with each colored line representing a different value of Φ. The four points of observation are marked with letters indicating a particular widely-recognized spectral band, since that's presumably how the measurements were done - attach a filter for the band to the observation instrument and record variations in intensity.
Ok thanks for explaining! :D
Killboe wrote:
AwersomeUser wrote:Thanks, what should I do with preparing this type of interperting stuff:
Image
Even after looking at the answer, I am still very confused at how to read this. :o Is it likely that these kind of stuff will show up on a state test?
I've never seen that on a test before. I really doubt that it'll be in a states test. So don't spend too much time on it.
Ok thanks.
Adi1008 wrote:
Killboe wrote:
bp31000 wrote: no, those are from UT invitational. he said he is writing the tests for their regionals for last weekend and will post them here, i am waiting for those.
My bad, I mistakened regional for invitational.
Hi everyone!

All the tournaments that were using my test finished up this weekend. You can find the exam materials (including some statistics and discussion) here!

Hopefully this helps some of you with studying, whether it's for state, nationals, or just for fun! As always, if you have any questions or feedback about the exam, feel free to let me know.
Yayyyyyyyyyyyyyy! A practice test!!! :lol:
2018-2019: Fossils, Solar System, Sci Quiz Bowl (Trial)
2019-2020: Circuit Lab, Machines, Mission (Im)possible, Reach For The Stars
2020-2021: Anatomy & Physilogy (if no conflicts) Astronomy, Enviromental Chemistry, Machines <-- I want to do these...

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