Experimental Design B/C

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » September 25th, 2018, 3:03 pm

Jacobi wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
Jacobi wrote:
Not exactly...
Try again.
Wait, what's wrong with that answer? That's pretty much the intent of a standard deviation. Did you just want the spread of the distribution?

Edit: Also, correcting this because the mismatched parentheses bother me...
Jacobi wrote:
Do they have to be all different?
1. Mean Perspiration (mL): 4 mph -> 72 mL (= (67 + 69 + 81)/3), 6 mph -> 87 mL, 8 mph -> 104 mL
2. Standard Deviation Perspiration (mL): 4 mph -> [math]\sqrt{\frac{(67-72)^2 + (69 - 72)^2 + (81 - 72)^2}{3}} =[/math] 7.6 mL, 6 mph -> 4.5 mL, 8 mph -> 4.6 mL
3. Median Perspiration (mL): 4 mph -> [b]Find middle of 3 values in order, that is, the second-highest value:[/b] [math]67, \underline{69}, 81[/math] 69 mL, 6 mph -> 87 mL, 8 mph - > 101 mL
4. Range Perspiration (mL): 4 mph -> [math]R = max - min = 81-67 =[/math] 14 mL, 6 mph -> 9 mL, 8mph -> 8 mL.
5. Mean Absolute Deviation (mL): 4 mph -> [math]\textrm{MAD} = \frac{1}{n}\Sigma_i |x_i - \overline{x}| = (|67 - 72.33| + |69 - 72.33| + |81 - 72.33|) / 3 = 5.8 mL[/math], 6 mph -> 3.1 mL, 8 mph -> 3.6 mL
6. Pearson Correlation between Hours and Milliliters: [math]r = \Sigma_i \frac{(x_i - \overline{x})(y_i - \overline{y}}{s_x s_y}[/math]
[math]\overline{x} = 6.00[/math]
[math]\overline{y} = 87.6[/math]
[math]s_y = 40.9[/math]
[math]s_x = 4.9[/math]
.
.
.
[math]r = 0.938[/math]
should be
1. Mean Perspiration (mL): 4 mph -> [math]\frac{67+69+81}{3} =[/math] 72 mL, 6 mph -> 87 mL, 8 mph -> 104 mL
2. Standard Deviation Perspiration (mL): 4 mph -> [math]\sqrt{\frac{(67-72)^2 + (69 - 72)^2 + (81 - 72)^2)}{3}} =[/math] 7.6 mL, 6 mph -> 4.5 mL, 8 mph -> 4.6 mL
3. Median Perspiration (mL): 4 mph -> [b]Find middle of 3 values in order, that is the second-highest value:[/b] [math]67, \underline{69}, 81 \Rightarrow[/math] 69 mL, 6 mph -> 87 mL, 8 mph - > 101 mL
4. Range Perspiration (mL): 4 mph -> [math]R = \textrm{max} - \textrm{min} = 81-67 =[/math] 14 mL, 6 mph -> 9 mL, 8mph -> 8 mL.
5. Mean Absolute Deviation (mL): 4 mph -> [math]MAD = \frac{1}{n}\Sigma_i |x_i - \overline{x}| = \frac{|67 - 72.33| + |69 - 72.33| + |81 - 72.33|}{3} =[/math] 5.8 mL, 6 mph -> 3.1 mL, 8 mph -> 3.6 mL
6. Pearson Correlation between Hours and Milliliters: [math]r = \Sigma_i \frac{(x_i - \overline{x})(y_i - \overline{y})}{s_x s_y}[/math]
[math]\overline{x} = 6.00[/math]
[math]\overline{y} = 87.6[/math]
[math]s_y = 40.9[/math]
[math]s_x = 4.9[/math]
.
.
.
[math]r = 0.938[/math]
What's wrong is the standard deviation measures the typical, not average, deviation from the mean. It's a fine but critical distinction. What parentheses did you correct?
Oh, oops I changed the parentheses in your post that I quoted instead of mine...

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by dxu46 » September 27th, 2018, 5:27 pm

New question:
What needs to be included in a proper Applications and Recommendations?

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by dxu46 » October 6th, 2018, 10:18 am

dxu46 wrote:New question:
What needs to be included in a proper Applications and Recommendations?
Is this question too hard or has everyone quit Expd?

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by Jacobi » October 13th, 2018, 11:33 am

dxu46 wrote:New question:
What needs to be included in a proper Applications and Recommendations?
Suggestions to improve the experiment.
Other ways to look at the hypothesis.
Future related experiments.
Applications of the results.
Last edited by Jacobi on October 14th, 2018, 1:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by dxu46 » October 14th, 2018, 10:51 am

Jacobi wrote:
dxu46 wrote:New question:
What needs to be included in a proper Applications and Recommendations?
Suggestions to improve the experiment.
Other ways to look at the hypothesis.
Future related experiments.
Applications of the results.
Your turn!

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by Jacobi » October 14th, 2018, 1:14 pm

Propose an experiment using the following materials:
-A bowl of water
-A wooden spool
-A metal spool
-A piece of foam
-5 ball bearings
-Timing device

Give a write-up for parts A-F and Applications/Recommendations.

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by OrigamiPlanet » October 18th, 2018, 3:22 pm

Jacobi wrote:Propose an experiment using the following materials:
-A bowl of water
-A wooden spool
-A metal spool
-A piece of foam
-5 ball bearings
-Timing device

Give a write-up for parts A-F and Applications/Recommendations.
Alrighty...
If 1, 2, and then 3 ball bearing(s) are placed on the piece of foam at different times and then the foam is placed on the water, the time it will take for the foam with the bearing(s) sink will increase by about 0.5 seconds. This is due to the increased weight on the foam, thus increasing the force that is pushing downwards (based on Newton's Second Law where F=ma).
[u]Independent Variable[/u]: The independent variable is the number of bearings in incremental units (if we get a scale, then change it to the mass of the ball bearings in grams). The units will increase by 1 bearing, then 2 bearings, then 3 bearings (again if we get a scale, then the mass is x grams, 2x grams, and then 3x grams, where x is the mass of one ball bearing). 
[u]Dependent Variable[/u]: The dependent variable is the time it takes for the piece of foam with the ball bearings to sink in seconds.
[u]Controlled Variables[/u]: The controls include the same piece of foam, along with the same composition of the ball bearings; the same depth of water that the mass must fall through, the same force acting on the mass is just gravity.
The experimental control will be the mass when there is only one bearing on top of the mass because it will be used to compare the other times that it takes for the mass to sink to indicate whether or not there is a significant difference in the time that it takes for it to sink.
The materials used are the following: 1 bowl of water (with whatever given volumetric measurement it is given in), one piece of foam (with whatever length and width it is in any distance measurement), 3 ball bearings (of whatever mass measurement it is given in), and one timer.
1. Gather all materials for the experiment.
2. Take one of the ball bearings and place it at the center of the piece of foam.
3. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
4. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
5. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
6. Repeat steps 3-5 two more times.
7. After drying the foam as much as possible, take the ball bearing off so that one can take another ball bearing and reposition the ball bearings so that their combined center of mass is at the center (or as close as possible; this should result in the two side-by-side).
8. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
9. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
10. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
11. Repeat steps 8-10 two more times.
12. After drying this foam again, take both bearings off, and grab the third bearing. Place the three bearings in a triangular shape, but make sure their total center of mass is at the center of the foam.
13. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
14. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
15. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
16. Repeat steps 13-15 two more times.
17. Dry out the foam and the bearings out as much as possible, clean up materials, and perform any new observations and calculations.
I do not know how you can create qualitative observations (F) for this? If you tell me how to do it I will try and do it to the best of my ability. Sorry!
One possible improvement could be to let the foam dry out even more so that there is less weight already initially in the trials. Another potential improvement is to refill the bowl of water to the amount of water that is needed in it.
Other ways to look at the hypothesis are to test the displacement of water levels on the bowl with each bearing, or to potentially place larger increments in the ball bearings to indicate a greater difference (1, 3, and 5 bearings?). 
Future experiments could include testing if some of the items sink or not, or potentially soak the foam in different amounts of water and see if it creates a difference to how long it takes the foam to sink.
Practical applications for the experiment could include having cargo masses on a ship while out at sea, and when a crash occurs, one can figure out how far the ship may sunk in order to determine the position of cargo, especially if it happens to be precious cargo.
Hope this will suffice! :)
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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by dxu46 » October 18th, 2018, 3:35 pm

OrigamiPlanet wrote:
Jacobi wrote:Propose an experiment using the following materials:
-A bowl of water
-A wooden spool
-A metal spool
-A piece of foam
-5 ball bearings
-Timing device

Give a write-up for parts A-F and Applications/Recommendations.
Alrighty...
If 1, 2, and then 3 ball bearing(s) are placed on the piece of foam at different times and then the foam is placed on the water, the time it will take for the foam with the bearing(s) sink will increase by about 0.5 seconds. This is due to the increased weight on the foam, thus increasing the force that is pushing downwards (based on Newton's Second Law where F=ma).
[u]Independent Variable[/u]: The independent variable is the number of bearings in incremental units (if we get a scale, then change it to the mass of the ball bearings in grams). The units will increase by 1 bearing, then 2 bearings, then 3 bearings (again if we get a scale, then the mass is x grams, 2x grams, and then 3x grams, where x is the mass of one ball bearing). 
[u]Dependent Variable[/u]: The dependent variable is the time it takes for the piece of foam with the ball bearings to sink in seconds.
[u]Controlled Variables[/u]: The controls include the same piece of foam, along with the same composition of the ball bearings; the same depth of water that the mass must fall through, the same force acting on the mass is just gravity.
The experimental control will be the mass when there is only one bearing on top of the mass because it will be used to compare the other times that it takes for the mass to sink to indicate whether or not there is a significant difference in the time that it takes for it to sink.
The materials used are the following: 1 bowl of water (with whatever given volumetric measurement it is given in), one piece of foam (with whatever length and width it is in any distance measurement), 3 ball bearings (of whatever mass measurement it is given in), and one timer.
1. Gather all materials for the experiment.
2. Take one of the ball bearings and place it at the center of the piece of foam.
3. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
4. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
5. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
6. Repeat steps 3-5 two more times.
7. After drying the foam as much as possible, take the ball bearing off so that one can take another ball bearing and reposition the ball bearings so that their combined center of mass is at the center (or as close as possible; this should result in the two side-by-side).
8. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
9. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
10. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
11. Repeat steps 8-10 two more times.
12. After drying this foam again, take both bearings off, and grab the third bearing. Place the three bearings in a triangular shape, but make sure their total center of mass is at the center of the foam.
13. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
14. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
15. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
16. Repeat steps 13-15 two more times.
17. Dry out the foam and the bearings out as much as possible, clean up materials, and perform any new observations and calculations.
I do not know how you can create qualitative observations (F) for this? If you tell me how to do it I will try and do it to the best of my ability. Sorry!
One possible improvement could be to let the foam dry out even more so that there is less weight already initially in the trials. Another potential improvement is to refill the bowl of water to the amount of water that is needed in it.
Other ways to look at the hypothesis are to test the displacement of water levels on the bowl with each bearing, or to potentially place larger increments in the ball bearings to indicate a greater difference (1, 3, and 5 bearings?). 
Future experiments could include testing if some of the items sink or not, or potentially soak the foam in different amounts of water and see if it creates a difference to how long it takes the foam to sink.
Practical applications for the experiment could include having cargo masses on a ship while out at sea, and when a crash occurs, one can figure out how far the ship may sunk in order to determine the position of cargo, especially if it happens to be precious cargo.
Hope this will suffice! :)
Dang...

Jacobi: in the future, can we try to avoid these obnoxiously long questions? You could just ask for a specific part, like applications or analysis. This question, I'd imagine, probably took about 10 minutes for OrigamIPlanet to answer...

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by Jacobi » October 18th, 2018, 4:57 pm

dxu46 wrote:
OrigamiPlanet wrote:
Jacobi wrote:Propose an experiment using the following materials:
-A bowl of water
-A wooden spool
-A metal spool
-A piece of foam
-5 ball bearings
-Timing device

Give a write-up for parts A-F and Applications/Recommendations.
Alrighty...
If 1, 2, and then 3 ball bearing(s) are placed on the piece of foam at different times and then the foam is placed on the water, the time it will take for the foam with the bearing(s) sink will increase by about 0.5 seconds. This is due to the increased weight on the foam, thus increasing the force that is pushing downwards (based on Newton's Second Law where F=ma).
[u]Independent Variable[/u]: The independent variable is the number of bearings in incremental units (if we get a scale, then change it to the mass of the ball bearings in grams). The units will increase by 1 bearing, then 2 bearings, then 3 bearings (again if we get a scale, then the mass is x grams, 2x grams, and then 3x grams, where x is the mass of one ball bearing). 
[u]Dependent Variable[/u]: The dependent variable is the time it takes for the piece of foam with the ball bearings to sink in seconds.
[u]Controlled Variables[/u]: The controls include the same piece of foam, along with the same composition of the ball bearings; the same depth of water that the mass must fall through, the same force acting on the mass is just gravity.
The experimental control will be the mass when there is only one bearing on top of the mass because it will be used to compare the other times that it takes for the mass to sink to indicate whether or not there is a significant difference in the time that it takes for it to sink.
The materials used are the following: 1 bowl of water (with whatever given volumetric measurement it is given in), one piece of foam (with whatever length and width it is in any distance measurement), 3 ball bearings (of whatever mass measurement it is given in), and one timer.
1. Gather all materials for the experiment.
2. Take one of the ball bearings and place it at the center of the piece of foam.
3. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
4. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
5. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
6. Repeat steps 3-5 two more times.
7. After drying the foam as much as possible, take the ball bearing off so that one can take another ball bearing and reposition the ball bearings so that their combined center of mass is at the center (or as close as possible; this should result in the two side-by-side).
8. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
9. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
10. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
11. Repeat steps 8-10 two more times.
12. After drying this foam again, take both bearings off, and grab the third bearing. Place the three bearings in a triangular shape, but make sure their total center of mass is at the center of the foam.
13. Carefully hover the piece of foam over the bowl of water at the very center.
14. Let the foam drop, and as the bottom of the foam touches the water, begin the timer.
15. Once the foam reaches the bottom of the bowl, stop the timer and record the time. Take the foam out and try to remove as much water from the foam and bearing before doing another trial.
16. Repeat steps 13-15 two more times.
17. Dry out the foam and the bearings out as much as possible, clean up materials, and perform any new observations and calculations.
I do not know how you can create qualitative observations (F) for this? If you tell me how to do it I will try and do it to the best of my ability. Sorry!
One possible improvement could be to let the foam dry out even more so that there is less weight already initially in the trials. Another potential improvement is to refill the bowl of water to the amount of water that is needed in it.
Other ways to look at the hypothesis are to test the displacement of water levels on the bowl with each bearing, or to potentially place larger increments in the ball bearings to indicate a greater difference (1, 3, and 5 bearings?). 
Future experiments could include testing if some of the items sink or not, or potentially soak the foam in different amounts of water and see if it creates a difference to how long it takes the foam to sink.
Practical applications for the experiment could include having cargo masses on a ship while out at sea, and when a crash occurs, one can figure out how far the ship may sunk in order to determine the position of cargo, especially if it happens to be precious cargo.
Hope this will suffice! :)
Dang...

Jacobi: in the future, can we try to avoid these obnoxiously long questions? You could just ask for a specific part, like applications or analysis. This question, I'd imagine, probably took about 10 minutes for OrigamIPlanet to answer...
Very, very good. Sorry, I should have written A-E. I was just trying to cover the design part of the experiment - which includes all of these things.

You can't have part B or C without A, or parts D and E without A, B, and C, or part M without A-E. You have to build up each component.
If this question. caused significant incovenience, I apologize.

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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by OrigamiPlanet » October 21st, 2018, 6:43 pm

Jacobi wrote: Very, very good. Sorry, I should have written A-E. I was just trying to cover the design part of the experiment - which includes all of these things.

You can't have part B or C without A, or parts D and E without A, B, and C, or part M without A-E. You have to build up each component.
If this question. caused significant incovenience, I apologize.
No you're fine! Here's how I'd do it though just to make things easier (and if you can try to answer it, too!).

Prompt: Using the given materials, create a potential experiment about diffusion and list the variables.
- Water (you get as much as you need)
- Red food coloring
- Blue food coloring
- Green food coloring
- 3 popsicle sticks
- 5 250 mL beakers
- A ruler
- A timepiece

The person doesn't need to state their hypothesis, but it does encourage them to create one mentally at the very least, if that makes sense!
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