Dynamic Planet B/C

User avatar
SciolyHarsh
Member
Member
Posts: 37
Joined: May 20th, 2018, 5:44 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by SciolyHarsh » January 14th, 2019, 3:35 pm

a. Calculate the density of a glacier with a weight of 10780 Newtons and a thickness of 2 meters.
b. What state is the ice with this density in?
2017-2018 Events: Chemistry Lab, Dynamic Planet, Microbe Mission, Experimental Design, Rocks and Minerals

2018-2019 Events: Dynamic Planet, Astronomy, Sounds of Music, Circuit Lab, Geologic Mapping

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1523
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 16th, 2019, 8:25 am

SciolyHarsh wrote:a. Calculate the density of a glacier with a weight of 10780 Newtons and a thickness of 2 meters.
b. What state is the ice with this density in?
Wouldn't this require the area of the glacier?

User avatar
Sapphire
Member
Member
Posts: 27
Joined: April 15th, 2019, 4:52 pm
Division: B
State: MI
Location: Somewhere in NGC5128
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by Sapphire » April 21st, 2019, 7:57 pm

Yeah, you need area.
Hello to my coaches, Pioneers, and fellow Slauson peeps!

2020 - Crime Busters, Circuit Lab, Density Lab, RFTS, Mission Possible

SomeoneElse
Member
Member
Posts: 3
Joined: December 5th, 2018, 4:33 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by SomeoneElse » April 22nd, 2019, 6:04 pm

SciolyHarsh wrote:a. Calculate the density of a glacier with a weight of 10780 Newtons and a thickness of 2 meters.
b. What state is the ice with this density in?
a. answer
a. Without the area, I guess I can only guess.
The mass would be 1098.87 kg., due to dividing the weight by gravity.
The volume would be 2x, where x is the area of the glacier in m^2.
the density of the glacier has to be between 800 and 900 kg/m^3.
I'll take a wild guess here; the area of the glacier is 600 meters squared.
After making that calculation, the formula would be 1098.87 / 1200, in kg/m^3.
Thus, the density of the glacier would be 915.7 kg/m^3. (not very close, but good enough)
b. answer
Now, again, since I made a wild guess with the area, the density I got would most likely suggest the ice is glacial ice. If the density was from 400-800 kg/m^3, it would be reasonable to say the ice was firn.
2019: Disease Detectives, Dynamic Planet, Density Lab
2018: Disease Detectives, Dynamic Planet, Rocks and Minerals

Medal Count (Including Invitationals): 11
Medal Count (Regionals and States only): 5

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1523
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 22nd, 2019, 7:17 pm

SomeoneElse wrote:
SciolyHarsh wrote:a. Calculate the density of a glacier with a weight of 10780 Newtons and a thickness of 2 meters.
b. What state is the ice with this density in?
a. answer
a. Without the area, I guess I can only guess.
The mass would be 1098.87 kg., due to dividing the weight by gravity.
The volume would be 2x, where x is the area of the glacier in m^2.
the density of the glacier has to be between 800 and 900 kg/m^3.
I'll take a wild guess here; the area of the glacier is 600 meters squared.
After making that calculation, the formula would be 1098.87 / 1200, in kg/m^3.
Thus, the density of the glacier would be 915.7 kg/m^3. (not very close, but good enough)
b. answer
Now, again, since I made a wild guess with the area, the density I got would most likely suggest the ice is glacial ice. If the density was from 400-800 kg/m^3, it would be reasonable to say the ice was firn.
*shrug* I guess you can ask a question next.

SomeoneElse
Member
Member
Posts: 3
Joined: December 5th, 2018, 4:33 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by SomeoneElse » April 27th, 2019, 2:27 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
SomeoneElse wrote:
SciolyHarsh wrote:a. Calculate the density of a glacier with a weight of 10780 Newtons and a thickness of 2 meters.
b. What state is the ice with this density in?
a. answer
a. Without the area, I guess I can only guess.
The mass would be 1098.87 kg., due to dividing the weight by gravity.
The volume would be 2x, where x is the area of the glacier in m^2.
the density of the glacier has to be between 800 and 900 kg/m^3.
I'll take a wild guess here; the area of the glacier is 600 meters squared.
After making that calculation, the formula would be 1098.87 / 1200, in kg/m^3.
Thus, the density of the glacier would be 915.7 kg/m^3. (not very close, but good enough)
b. answer
Now, again, since I made a wild guess with the area, the density I got would most likely suggest the ice is glacial ice. If the density was from 400-800 kg/m^3, it would be reasonable to say the ice was firn.
*shrug* I guess you can ask a question next.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Alright:

1. Define dead ice. What is it usually covered with?

2. Approximately what percent of ice does Antarctica discharge through it's ice streams?

3. Approximately how long will this interglacial period last?
2019: Disease Detectives, Dynamic Planet, Density Lab
2018: Disease Detectives, Dynamic Planet, Rocks and Minerals

Medal Count (Including Invitationals): 11
Medal Count (Regionals and States only): 5

User avatar
Giantpants
Member
Member
Posts: 141
Joined: February 7th, 2019, 5:42 am
Division: C
State: NY
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 19 times

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by Giantpants » April 27th, 2019, 11:26 pm

SomeoneElse wrote: 1. Define dead ice. What is it usually covered with?

2. Approximately what percent of ice does Antarctica discharge through it's ice streams?

3. Approximately how long will this interglacial period last?
1. Ice that has been seperated from the moving glacier (not flowing) and has been since covered with drift and moraines.
2. 90% I think
3. Not completely sure but I think somewhere in the realm of 20000 years total given lengths of previous interglacials
President, Kellenberg, 2018-2020
Bro. Joseph Fox, 2014-2017

2020 Events: Dynamic Planet, Geologic Mapping, Sounds of Music, Astronomy
Giantpants's Userpage

SomeoneElse
Member
Member
Posts: 3
Joined: December 5th, 2018, 4:33 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by SomeoneElse » April 28th, 2019, 8:40 pm

Giantpants wrote:
SomeoneElse wrote: 1. Define dead ice. What is it usually covered with?

2. Approximately what percent of ice does Antarctica discharge through it's ice streams?

3. Approximately how long will this interglacial period last?
1. Ice that has been seperated from the moving glacier (not flowing) and has been since covered with drift and moraines.
2. 90% I think
3. Not completely sure but I think somewhere in the realm of 20000 years total given lengths of previous interglacials
1. Yep

2. Yeah again

3. I wrote this queston as kind of a trick question; it's not exactly sure, but your answer (20,000 years) is in the range, so I'll allow it.
Your turn!
2019: Disease Detectives, Dynamic Planet, Density Lab
2018: Disease Detectives, Dynamic Planet, Rocks and Minerals

Medal Count (Including Invitationals): 11
Medal Count (Regionals and States only): 5

User avatar
Giantpants
Member
Member
Posts: 141
Joined: February 7th, 2019, 5:42 am
Division: C
State: NY
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 19 times

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by Giantpants » April 29th, 2019, 6:12 am

Alright!

1. What are stratugi?
2. From which zone (accumulation or ablation) to which zone does ice flow in a glacier?
3. What are three ways accumulation can occur?
President, Kellenberg, 2018-2020
Bro. Joseph Fox, 2014-2017

2020 Events: Dynamic Planet, Geologic Mapping, Sounds of Music, Astronomy
Giantpants's Userpage

User avatar
Sapphire
Member
Member
Posts: 27
Joined: April 15th, 2019, 4:52 pm
Division: B
State: MI
Location: Somewhere in NGC5128
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by Sapphire » April 30th, 2019, 7:02 pm

Giantpants wrote:Alright!

1. What are stratugi?
2. From which zone (accumulation or ablation) to which zone does ice flow in a glacier?
3. What are three ways accumulation can occur?
1. This small snow dune thing
2. Accumulation to ablation
3. Precipitation, wind-blown snow, and avalanching

Post Reply

Return to “2019 Question Marathons”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests