Anatomy and Physiology B/C

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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by jxxu20 » March 7th, 2019, 2:03 pm

1. Vasoconstriction
2. Pharyngeal (adenoids)
3. Chemotaxis
4. Preload, contractility, afterload
5. True
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by amk578 » March 7th, 2019, 9:23 pm

jxxu20 wrote:
1. Vasoconstriction
2. Pharyngeal (adenoids)
3. Chemotaxis
4. Preload, contractility, afterload
5. True
Looks good for the most part; except for number 2 the palatine tonsils are the most often infected, which is attributed to by the fact that the palatine tonsils are normally the largest. Your turn!
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by jxxu20 » March 8th, 2019, 5:17 pm

1. What arteries supply the thymus, and what veins drain it?
2. Differentiate between the functions of thymosin, thymulin, thymopoietin, and THF in T cell development (no need to go into chemical mechanisms).
3a. Jane, who does A&P as one of her SciOly events, is in math class one day. Mrs. Lymphton, her math teacher, says, "One, three, five, seven..." All of a sudden, Jane blurts out, "The organ of odd numbers is ______." What organ is Jane referring to, and how did that organ get its nickname?
3b. Name a disease that would trigger the shrinking of this organ.
4. How are the cells in HDVs (high endothelial venules) different than normal endothelial cells?
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by huppada » March 9th, 2019, 2:09 pm

jxxu20 wrote:1. What arteries supply the thymus, and what veins drain it?
2. Differentiate between the functions of thymosin, thymulin, thymopoietin, and THF in T cell development (no need to go into chemical mechanisms).
3a. Jane, who does A&P as one of her SciOly events, is in math class one day. Mrs. Lymphton, her math teacher, says, "One, three, five, seven..." All of a sudden, Jane blurts out, "The organ of odd numbers is ______." What organ is Jane referring to, and how did that organ get its nickname?
3b. Name a disease that would trigger the shrinking of this organ.
4. How are the cells in HDVs (high endothelial venules) different than normal endothelial cells?
1) Internal thoracic arteries supply the thymus and internal thoracic veins drain it,
2) Thymosin helps in T cell maturation, thymulin helps in T cell differentiation, thymopoietin stimulates T cell development, and I have no idea what THF is :/
3a) The spleen is also known as the organ of odd numbers because the anatomy of the organ can be described using odd numbers: The spleen is 1 inch x 3 inches x 5 inches in dimensions, it is usually about 7 ounces in weight, and it is found under ribs 9 and 11.
3b) Sickle cell anemia
4) The endothelial cells are taller and plumper than normal endothelial cells
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by farmerjoe279 » March 9th, 2019, 2:17 pm

huppada wrote:
jxxu20 wrote:1. What arteries supply the thymus, and what veins drain it?
2. Differentiate between the functions of thymosin, thymulin, thymopoietin, and THF in T cell development (no need to go into chemical mechanisms).
3a. Jane, who does A&P as one of her SciOly events, is in math class one day. Mrs. Lymphton, her math teacher, says, "One, three, five, seven..." All of a sudden, Jane blurts out, "The organ of odd numbers is ______." What organ is Jane referring to, and how did that organ get its nickname?
3b. Name a disease that would trigger the shrinking of this organ.
4. How are the cells in HDVs (high endothelial venules) different than normal endothelial cells?
1) Internal thoracic arteries supply the thymus and internal thoracic veins drain it,
2) Thymosin helps in T cell maturation, thymulin helps in T cell differentiation, thymopoietin stimulates T cell development, and I have no idea what THF is :/
3a) The spleen is also known as the organ of odd numbers because the anatomy of the organ can be described using odd numbers: The spleen is 1 inch x 3 inches x 5 inches in dimensions, it is usually about 7 ounces in weight, and it is found under ribs 9 and 11.
3b) Sickle cell anemia
4) The endothelial cells are taller and plumper than normal endothelial cells
Where do you even learn 3a ?!?!?!?!
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by huppada » March 10th, 2019, 7:36 am

farmerjoe279 wrote:
huppada wrote:
jxxu20 wrote:1. What arteries supply the thymus, and what veins drain it?
2. Differentiate between the functions of thymosin, thymulin, thymopoietin, and THF in T cell development (no need to go into chemical mechanisms).
3a. Jane, who does A&P as one of her SciOly events, is in math class one day. Mrs. Lymphton, her math teacher, says, "One, three, five, seven..." All of a sudden, Jane blurts out, "The organ of odd numbers is ______." What organ is Jane referring to, and how did that organ get its nickname?
3b. Name a disease that would trigger the shrinking of this organ.
4. How are the cells in HDVs (high endothelial venules) different than normal endothelial cells?
1) Internal thoracic arteries supply the thymus and internal thoracic veins drain it,
2) Thymosin helps in T cell maturation, thymulin helps in T cell differentiation, thymopoietin stimulates T cell development, and I have no idea what THF is :/
3a) The spleen is also known as the organ of odd numbers because the anatomy of the organ can be described using odd numbers: The spleen is 1 inch x 3 inches x 5 inches in dimensions, it is usually about 7 ounces in weight, and it is found under ribs 9 and 11.
3b) Sickle cell anemia
4) The endothelial cells are taller and plumper than normal endothelial cells
Where do you even learn 3a ?!?!?!?!
lmao i took an anatomy class last year and my teacher was crazy enough to teach us that, kinda like a "fun fact", i literally haven't seen it after that tho
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by jxxu20 » March 10th, 2019, 2:11 pm

1. The inferior thyroid arteries and veins are also involved in thymic circulation.
2. THF (thymic humoral factor) increases a T cell's immune response to viruses.
3a. Correct
3b. Correct
4. Correct
Also, to respond to farmerjoe279's question, I try to read as many selections from textbooks and watch as many different videos as possible. Specifically, I think I learned about "the organ of odd numbers" from Armando Hasudungan's YT channel (in the video about the spleen) :)
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by huppada » March 11th, 2019, 9:01 am

Cool, my turn now.

1) What can pyuria be a sign of?
2) Name three structures in the body that do not have lymphatic vessels.
3) What is the cause of the delay between the SA node of the heart and the AV node?
4) What is the difference between neurogenic diabetes insipidus and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus?
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by jxxu20 » March 11th, 2019, 1:26 pm

1. UTI
2. Brain, cornea of the eye, bone marrow
3. Fewer gap junctions, fiber diameter decreased
4. Neurogenic DI is caused by a decreased secretion of ADH; nephrogenic DI is caused by the kidneys' decreased ability to concentrate urine because of resistance to ADH action.
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Post by huppada » March 13th, 2019, 2:55 pm

jxxu20 wrote:
1. UTI
2. Brain, cornea of the eye, bone marrow
3. Fewer gap junctions, fiber diameter decreased
4. Neurogenic DI is caused by a decreased secretion of ADH; nephrogenic DI is caused by the kidneys' decreased ability to concentrate urine because of resistance to ADH action.
1) :D
2) :D
3) That's correct, but I had down that it was also due to slow calcium channels.
4) Nephrogenic DI can also be characterized by the lack of functional aquaporins.

Yay, your turn now :)
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