Meteorology B

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 5th, 2019, 5:31 pm

Next Question: (Trying a new format!:)

Your friend is looking outside and sees a cloud she's never seen before that has pouch-like shapes on the bottom on the cloud. What type of cloud is she looking at? What is that cloud associated with?

If thats not enough heres a hint: the name is from the Latin word that means udder/breast
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by LiteralRhinoceros » April 7th, 2019, 8:34 am

Mammatus Clouds
They typically bring thunderstorms.
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 7th, 2019, 6:25 pm

Correct! :D
They are also associated with anvil clouds
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by LiteralRhinoceros » April 8th, 2019, 7:11 am

Who created the following instruments?
Barometer
Anemometer
Radiosonde
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 8th, 2019, 2:48 pm

LiteralRhinocerous wrote
Who created the following instruments?
Barometer
Anemometer
Radiosonde
Barometer: Evangelista Torricelli created the original and that was improved by othes such as Blaise Pascal and Florin Perier Anemometer: The first was created by Leon Battista Alberti. Many others including John Thomas Romney Robinson and John Patternson approved upon the original design Radiosonde: The first radiosonde was made by Gustave Hermite and Georges Besancon, the design was later improced by Colonel William Blaire and the first modern one was made by Robert Bureau.
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 9th, 2019, 5:20 pm

Next question! :)

What does it mean that frontogenesis is an increase in the thermal gradient while frontolysis is a decrease in the thermal gradient? How does that apply to isotherms?
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by TheCrazyChemist » April 10th, 2019, 2:10 pm

IHateClouds wrote:Next question! :)

What does it mean that frontogenesis is an increase in the thermal gradient while frontolysis is a decrease in the thermal gradient? How does that apply to isotherms?
Ok, I'll take a shot at this one. A front is essentially a difference in temperatures between to air masses that are colliding. Frontogenesis is essentially the birth of fronts or the increasing of them(I guess), so it is the 'birth' or increasing of that temperature gradient. Frontolysis is the degradation of a front on some level. Again, a front is essentially a temperature gradient, so frontolysis is the decreasing of that gradient. I feel like I kind of know the answer, I'm just terrible at explaining it. Next one, isotherms. Well, isotherms are lines on a map that connect areas of similar temperatures. So, frontolysis causes a gradient in temperature to occur or increase, so the isotherm is kind of eradicated. Frontolysis is the opposite, the isotherm gets 'stronger'. Next Question(sorry if it's bad): What are lenticular clouds and how are they formed?
Last edited by TheCrazyChemist on April 10th, 2019, 6:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 10th, 2019, 2:51 pm

TheCrazyChemist wrote: Ok, I'll take a shot at this one. A front is essentially a difference in temperatures between to air masses that are colliding. Frontogenesis is essentially the birth of fronts or the increasing of them(I guess), so it is the 'birth' or increasing of that temperature gradient. Frontolysis is the degradation of a front on some level. Again, a front is essentially a temperature gradient, so frontolysis is the decreasing of that gradient. I feel like I kind of know the answer, I'm just terrible at explaining it. Next one, isotherms. Well, isotherms are lines on a map that connect areas of similar temperatures. So, frontolysis causes a gradient in temperature to occur or increase, so the isotherm is kind of eradicated. Frontolysis is the opposite, the isotherm gets 'stronger'.
dont forget to hide your answer somehow next time! :D

Thats pretty much right, but here's how I would explain it: The increase in the thermal gradient means that the isotherms are thicker together, so there is a larger temperature change in the frontal zone. The decrease in thermal gradients means that the isotherms are more spread out and there is a much more gradual temperature change.
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 10th, 2019, 3:01 pm

Heh I forgot to answer the question :D whooops.
TheCrazyChemist wrote
What are lenticular clouds and how are they formed?
Lenticular clouds are formed by topography and look like UFOs or lenses. As for the formation, they are created by the topography, specifically mountains. The clouds form in their odd shape via orographic lifting. (I think that when the air hits the base it moves up the mountain or something like that and forms via adiabatic cooling like most clouds.) and before I forget:
Next Question!!! Why are mountain & valley winds similar to land & sea breezes? How?
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by TheCrazyChemist » April 10th, 2019, 5:35 pm

IHateClouds wrote:Heh I forgot to answer the question :D whooops.
TheCrazyChemist wrote
What are lenticular clouds and how are they formed?
Lenticular clouds are formed by topography and look like UFOs or lenses. As for the formation, they are created by the topography, specifically mountains. The clouds form in their odd shape via orographic lifting. (I think that when the air hits the base it moves up the mountain or something like that and forms via adiabatic cooling like most clouds.) and before I forget:
Next Question!!! Why are mountain & valley winds similar to land & sea breezes? How?
Oops, I'll remember to hide my answers next time.

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