Meteorology B

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 10th, 2019, 5:50 pm

TheCrazyChemist wrote
Oops, I'll remember to hide my answers next time.
well, you can always edit your post ;)
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by TheCrazyChemist » April 10th, 2019, 6:03 pm

TheCrazyChemist wrote:
IHateClouds wrote:Next question! :)

What does it mean that frontogenesis is an increase in the thermal gradient while frontolysis is a decrease in the thermal gradient? How does that apply to isotherms?
[hide]Ok, I'll take a shot at this one. A front is essentially a difference in temperatures between to air masses that are colliding. Frontogenesis is essentially the birth of fronts or the increasing of them(I guess), so it is the 'birth' or increasing of that temperature gradient. Frontolysis is the degradation of a front on some level. Again, a front is essentially a temperature gradient, so frontolysis is the decreasing of that gradient. I feel like I kind of know the answer, I'm just terrible at explaining it. Next one, isotherms. Well, isotherms are lines on a map that connect areas of similar temperatures. So, frontolysis causes a gradient in temperature to occur or increase, so the isotherm is kind of eradicated. Frontolysis is the opposite, the isotherm gets 'stronger'.[/hide]

Next Question(sorry if it's bad): What are lenticular clouds and how are they formed?

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 18th, 2019, 11:52 am

IHateClouds wrote
Next Question!!! Why are mountain & valley winds similar to land & sea breezes? How?
No one answered this question, so I'll just answer it and post a new one! (It may have been too hard?) Land and sea breezes are similar to mountain and valley breezes as they are the same phenomenon with the same cause. What happens is the difference in temperature from isolation creates wind due to the pressure gradient force. (eg. cold air is denser and has a higher pressure and the pressure gradient force makes areas of high pressure go to areas of low pressure) However, the breezes are caused by one of the locations heating up faster in the day and cooling faster at night (the mountain + coastal land.) Next question: In the three cell model, what are the names of the three cells? Where are they located?
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by TheCrazyChemist » April 18th, 2019, 11:57 am

IHateClouds wrote:
IHateClouds wrote
Next Question!!! Why are mountain & valley winds similar to land & sea breezes? How?
No one answered this question, so I'll just answer it and post a new one! (It may have been too hard?) Land and sea breezes are similar to mountain and valley breezes as they are the same phenomenon with the same cause. What happens is the difference in temperature from isolation creates wind due to the pressure gradient force. (eg. cold air is denser and has a higher pressure and the pressure gradient force makes areas of high pressure go to areas of low pressure) However, the breezes are caused by one of the locations heating up faster in the day and cooling faster at night (the mountain + coastal land.) Next question: In the three cell model, what are the names of the three cells? Where are they located?
The three cells are the Hadley Cell, the Ferrel Cell, and the Polar Cell. They are all located in the upper atmopshere, and the Hadley cell and the Ferrel cell are separated by the horse latitudes. The Ferrel cell and the Polar cell and separated by the polar front.
Next Question: How do cyclones form (this is kind of open ended but I think if you know it, then what you say will be along the lines of what I'm looking for)?

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 18th, 2019, 12:25 pm

TheCrazyChemist wrote: The three cells are the Hadley Cell, the Ferrel Cell, and the Polar Cell. They are all located in the upper atmopshere, and the Hadley cell and the Ferrel cell are separated by the horse latitudes. The Ferrel cell and the Polar cell and separated by the polar front.
Correct!

Not sure this is what you were looking for but: Cyclones form via cyclogenesis, which is the strengthening of circulation in a low pressure area. Tropical cyclones form from lantent heat released which gives it a warm core. Extratropical cyclones form from waves in fronts, these later become cold core after forming an occluded front. (Although they can go through cyclogenesis again, creating a triple point.) Mesocyclones form from latent heat released in thunderstorms as well, but are much smaller than tropical cyclones. Next question: What are some key differences betweeen anticyclones and cyclone?
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by TheCrazyChemist » April 18th, 2019, 1:07 pm

IHateClouds wrote:
TheCrazyChemist wrote: The three cells are the Hadley Cell, the Ferrel Cell, and the Polar Cell. They are all located in the upper atmopshere, and the Hadley cell and the Ferrel cell are separated by the horse latitudes. The Ferrel cell and the Polar cell and separated by the polar front.
Correct!

Not sure this is what you were looking for but: Cyclones form via cyclogenesis, which is the strengthening of circulation in a low pressure area. Tropical cyclones form from lantent heat released which gives it a warm core. Extratropical cyclones form from waves in fronts, these later become cold core after forming an occluded front. (Although they can go through cyclogenesis again, creating a triple point.) Mesocyclones form from latent heat released in thunderstorms as well, but are much smaller than tropical cyclones. Next question: What are some key differences betweeen anticyclones and cyclone?
It wasn't what I was looking for but it was correct anyways. Anticyclones are literally the opposites of cyclones, so this is pretty broad. I guess I should start with the fact that anticyclones have a high pressure center in contrast to cyclones. Anticyclone usually cause good weather (I think?)  while cyclones cause bad weather. Air subsides in anticyclones while it rises in cyclones.
Next question:
What is the dew point and how does it affect daily weather?

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 18th, 2019, 3:21 pm

TheCrazyChemist wrote
It wasn't what I was looking for but it was correct anyways.
What were you looking for? :?: (Just for future reference:)

You were correct about the (anti)cyclones! :D
TheCrazyChemist wrote
What is the dew point and how does it affect daily weather?
The dew point is the temperature at which water vapor condenses. It affects the humidity and when the temperature reaches the dew point, rain occurs! Next question:
In a sling physchrometer, if the wet bulb reading is 18 degrees Celsius and the dry bulb is 12 degrees Celsius, what is the relative humidity?
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by randomsci » April 19th, 2019, 8:54 pm

Do you mean dry bulb 18 and wet bulb 12?(Wet should not be higher)

If so, then
48%

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by IHateClouds » April 20th, 2019, 8:35 am

randomsci wrote:
Do you mean dry bulb 18 and wet bulb 12?(Wet should not be higher)
Oops D: My bad!

Correct! Any answer between 48-50% works
Your turn!
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by randomsci » May 3rd, 2019, 9:39 pm

Thanks! :D :D
Next Question: What does the Saffir Simpson scale measure?

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