Mis Graded event tests

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EastStroudsburg13
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Re: Mis Graded event tests

Postby EastStroudsburg13 » November 14th, 2017, 12:09 pm

For my tests I generally attempt to include a variety of question types; having just one multiple choice section can really help decrease the time of grading, even if I'm the one doing the grading. However, I definitely try to have multiple sections of short answer or other similar formats, as they do help with rank differentiation.

An important factor to consider is when in the day the event is. If it's in the first half of the day, then you can get away with including more short answer and open-ended questions. If you've got people taking tests in the last slot of the day, you're going to want to make sure that there are quick ways to grade, otherwise you're going to be very crunched at the end, and you risk being that event that delays awards. ;)
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Re: Mis Graded event tests

Postby nicholasmaurer » November 14th, 2017, 12:31 pm

For my tests I generally attempt to include a variety of question types; having just one multiple choice section can really help decrease the time of grading, even if I'm the one doing the grading. However, I definitely try to have multiple sections of short answer or other similar formats, as they do help with rank differentiation.

An important factor to consider is when in the day the event is. If it's in the first half of the day, then you can get away with including more short answer and open-ended questions. If you've got people taking tests in the last slot of the day, you're going to want to make sure that there are quick ways to grade, otherwise you're going to be very crunched at the end, and you risk being that event that delays awards. ;)
In the interest of simplifying grading and ensuring objective scoring, I tend to stick to questions that have a clear right-or-wrong answer: multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, true/false, etc. If you are careful to write these with a varying level of difficulty, it is still possible to get effective differentiation between teams. This is especially true if you have at least 2 questions per team competing (e.g. 90 questions if 45 teams are competing that day).
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Re: Mis Graded event tests

Postby Unome » November 14th, 2017, 1:13 pm

For my tests I generally attempt to include a variety of question types; having just one multiple choice section can really help decrease the time of grading, even if I'm the one doing the grading. However, I definitely try to have multiple sections of short answer or other similar formats, as they do help with rank differentiation.

An important factor to consider is when in the day the event is. If it's in the first half of the day, then you can get away with including more short answer and open-ended questions. If you've got people taking tests in the last slot of the day, you're going to want to make sure that there are quick ways to grade, otherwise you're going to be very crunched at the end, and you risk being that event that delays awards. ;)
In the interest of simplifying grading and ensuring objective scoring, I tend to stick to questions that have a clear right-or-wrong answer: multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, true/false, etc. If you are careful to write these with a varying level of difficulty, it is still possible to get effective differentiation between teams. This is especially true if you have at least 2 questions per team competing (e.g. 90 questions if 45 teams are competing that day).
I try... although despite 80 MC and 20 points of free-response, there was still a 7-way tie at 31 points on Remote last weekend. I've yet to master the art of writing medium-difficulty questions - although that could just be because there's no real difference between the 10th place and 30th place teams anyway.
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Re: Mis Graded event tests

Postby whythelongface » November 14th, 2017, 1:54 pm

For my tests I generally attempt to include a variety of question types; having just one multiple choice section can really help decrease the time of grading, even if I'm the one doing the grading. However, I definitely try to have multiple sections of short answer or other similar formats, as they do help with rank differentiation.

An important factor to consider is when in the day the event is. If it's in the first half of the day, then you can get away with including more short answer and open-ended questions. If you've got people taking tests in the last slot of the day, you're going to want to make sure that there are quick ways to grade, otherwise you're going to be very crunched at the end, and you risk being that event that delays awards. ;)
In the interest of simplifying grading and ensuring objective scoring, I tend to stick to questions that have a clear right-or-wrong answer: multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, true/false, etc. If you are careful to write these with a varying level of difficulty, it is still possible to get effective differentiation between teams. This is especially true if you have at least 2 questions per team competing (e.g. 90 questions if 45 teams are competing that day).
I try... although despite 80 MC and 20 points of free-response, there was still a 7-way tie at 31 points on Remote last weekend. I've yet to master the art of writing medium-difficulty questions - although that could just be because there's no real difference between the 10th place and 30th place teams anyway.
To be fair, Remote is one of those events which, especially early in the season, nobody has experience doing and usually get drafted into. The understanding comes after one or two more invitationals.
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Re: Mis Graded event tests

Postby knottingpurple » November 14th, 2017, 7:02 pm

For my tests I generally attempt to include a variety of question types; having just one multiple choice section can really help decrease the time of grading, even if I'm the one doing the grading. However, I definitely try to have multiple sections of short answer or other similar formats, as they do help with rank differentiation.

An important factor to consider is when in the day the event is. If it's in the first half of the day, then you can get away with including more short answer and open-ended questions. If you've got people taking tests in the last slot of the day, you're going to want to make sure that there are quick ways to grade, otherwise you're going to be very crunched at the end, and you risk being that event that delays awards. ;)
In the interest of simplifying grading and ensuring objective scoring, I tend to stick to questions that have a clear right-or-wrong answer: multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, true/false, etc. If you are careful to write these with a varying level of difficulty, it is still possible to get effective differentiation between teams. This is especially true if you have at least 2 questions per team competing (e.g. 90 questions if 45 teams are competing that day).
I try... although despite 80 MC and 20 points of free-response, there was still a 7-way tie at 31 points on Remote last weekend. I've yet to master the art of writing medium-difficulty questions - although that could just be because there's no real difference between the 10th place and 30th place teams anyway.
I think free-response can be made more easy to grade - by being super super specific in the answer key, especially for math problems requiring certain formulas written out and so on, by identifying multiple different ways to explain something as long as certain parts were included for either explanation - but the way to make grading easier is to put more and more and more time into answer keys, so I guess at some point it is a question of how much can you reasonably ask of event supervisors who have other things going on in their lives?
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