Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

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Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby Skink » January 24th, 2014, 5:25 pm

A conversation today turned to this:
Teammate: How much time do you put into this?
Me: *chuckles* Don't ask.

That got me wondering. If you're a competitor, how much time do you pour into this? If you're an alum, how much time did you pour into this? How about your teammates? If you've been doing it for two or more seasons, does the amount of time you put in change by the season? What about within the course of one season? Do you put in more time in, say, March than in October or November? Thanks.

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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby zyzzyva980 » January 24th, 2014, 6:44 pm

Yeah, Science Olympiad is an activity where you "get out what you put in." That said, I wouldn't call it a time sink. I found that, in general, I spent more time on it as we got closer and closer to state (and barely any before regionals- there's about a month gap in there that I really worked). I also found that I spent less and less time on it the older I got. Most of this was due to the other extracurriculars I had (also college apps). I was fortunate enough not to see any large drop-off in my success due to my pursuing other activities, but in more competitive states that would certainly happen. I'd also say my partners were great in my junior and senior year, and that helps a lot- knowing you're going in with someone you can trust to just tear off half of the test and do very well on it even if you can't make the time to work with them during the week.

So for me Science Olympiad was not a "time sink." I would add to that, however, that the one national medal that I received (Sounds of Music) was entirely due to forcing my partner to rehearse every night we could get before nationals.
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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby caseyotis » January 24th, 2014, 10:47 pm

I tend to cram a lot before competitions, and although lots of people say not to do it, it has always worked for me. Except at states last year. But that was because cramming was physically impossible. But I didn't spend as much time as I should have on those events.
I don't spend every day doing Science Olympiad, and most activity is later in the year for me.
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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby iwonder » January 25th, 2014, 6:12 am

Typically the few weeks before a contest get really really busy with SO, but this year it's kinda been more of a steady pace over the course of the season. It tends to start as soon as the rules come out, and then picks up after marching season, and peaks in mid to late April. States is in May for us.
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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby syo_astro » January 25th, 2014, 11:23 am

Invites are generally in January, regionals first week of February, states in March. NYS takes things...a bit earlier than most states I hear. But even outside that my school does tryouts, and this year I made sure everyone has to (some people used to not need to, I think I made things harder for myself). But even then, most people I feel study a bit differently from me...I basically work a system like this.

Summer: prepare ideas throughout, maybe meet up with partners, anticipate changes and topics (like for astro I already knew it was going to be for variable stars, I already knew what geomaps and rocks consisted of, I already knew general designs for scrambler).
September-November: Well, this varies through the years. Normally I would just have to put together all my notes in these months, but senior year has been a bit busy, so this extended into December. We also have tryouts basically by the end of that period, so I definitely have my notes down.
January-March: I basically practice tests for events, or for builds this year I've had to stick in time for that (which was mostly the past month or two...ugh, I wish I had help for just doing all this).
Post-March: I usually have tried to think about events and whatnot...idk what I'll do this year :cry: .

I think that I've also gotten more efficient (or maybe paranoid?) over time, so the amount of notes or whatever else I do has massively increased, but that figures. I would think I could've never filled a 3-5 inch binder when I was a 9th grader over the course of a weekend or even a month, but now I'm pretty sure that isn't big enough ;). I know at the very least I never could've even modified or build ANYTHING then. Also, tests I make have gotten better, but they take more time, which still makes sense. Hehe, yesterday I gave my astro partner a killer problem for example...moving on. Basically, I'm trying to say it is a time sink, but it isn't. The stuff that takes a lot more time are likely going to be a lot better, and even if I've gotten better at it, it still takes time. But anything takes time.

Outside that general schedule, I tend to day by day spend about an hour, except on Fridays and weekends where I probably spend around...4 (usually more) per day? Vacations I spend even more. Of course that varies between whether I'm home/at school or not, whether I have time for it, etc. I'd like to say I'm dedicated :P. Basically I try to make it so that the day before I can just relax and skim my notes unlike most people...except builds, builds I can't even right now. I feel like the majority of people probably cram and spend a ton less time than me. I'm not trying to be arrogant by saying that, it's more just like everyone HAS given me a wth response to this. In fact probably other people are more efficient and do just as well if not better. Maybe other people do spend this much time, which would be awesome, but irrelevant. For me, I at least enjoy what I do, and I hope that my time is well spent. Whether that means getting to nats or not, getting a medal or not, or anything else, I guess all I can do is hope I've gotten something out of this time, which I guess I have...either that or I'm crazy? But I'm sure that discussion can be saved for another time.
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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby EpicFailOlympian » January 25th, 2014, 6:41 pm

I think is a interesting discussion, but first to answer Skink's question, I think the answer is quite simple. Yes, to do well in Science Olympiad you have to spend significant amounts of time, and if you do, it does act as a "time sink." Now, is that time well spent? Is it worthwhile? Well, there was another thread about that, and the general sense was that people were either gratified by being rewarded of their hard work, learning new things, or having funny, memorable moments. Science Olympiad provides tangible goals, like Nats or medals and in their pursuit, you are rewarded with valuable experiences as well.

At my best, I was always a cram kid, barely studying until few weeks before regionals (March), then getting a tad more serious for states. Yeah, I was a casual. I liked the idea of me becoming a tryhard, regularly studying everyday and more on breaks, start attempting some building events + doing problem sets for math competitions, but that never actually happened. I was also an impulsive, absentminded kid who liked easy stimulus like TV, video games etc. which took precedence over all things mentally/physically strenuous because they seemed inherently more fun and enjoyable. Studying for fun? Inconceivable! Getting a medal was fun! Being a know-it-all and the first to answer the teacher's question was fun! Finishing a problem before everyone else was fun too! But increasingly, I got more lazy, rebellious, and less studious, actively pursing those easy stimuli, partly because their innate allure and maybe partly because they were withheld from me by an Asian mother. I'd play games while pretending to do homework, and Science Olympiad was nice too because it gave me an excuse to be online all the time, in name of "research." In Div. B, I really only did a bit of studying because I was partnered with my best friend; I felt an obligation to him and our little friendly rivalry. One surprise 1st place at regionals sealed my love for SO. Though as the years went by, I would only scrape by, procrastinating and only doing my homework at the last minute. Homework>SO, and as you can imagine, I did not fare well that year, my first year in the more competitive Div. C. Recently, my motivation and discipline deteriorated so much that, in face of the more intensive AP classes, I stopped even doing homework, and the tests I took at school were eerily similar to taking Science Olympiad tests - I had only a vague idea of what's going on. I quit SO this year, as I would only be dead weight to my teammates. This was one of the warning signs that I needed to change, and very drastically.

I guess my point of writing this is to ask questions for all you tryhards out there:
What motivates you guys? What got you into SO? Why did you decide to spend your time on SO, instead of leisure? How do you balance SO with school and other extra-curriculars?
Was it because you were always studious, and never got into easy stimuli to turn your brain to mush? Or you just know what you want to be and actively trying to achieve so?
What did you guys do over the course of your lives mental conditioning-wise, to become quick readers, thinkers, and problem solvers?

I'd really like to hear your thoughts guys. East? Koko? Alpha? Z? syo? I know you're lurking somewhere :P
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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby tangentline » January 25th, 2014, 7:40 pm

As a former Science Olympian, I was quite motivated to give it more priority than my classes, SAT scores, applications to college, etc. --I wanted to make states, I wanted to get medals, I wanted to explore areas and learn a ton of wonderful and interesting topics.

Most important is learning/exploring, and that is the major reason I continue to help with my Science Olympiad team after graduating, and more so, I get to explore the topics of basically every event out there to help people out. It helped me narrow down on my major of electrical engineering, compound machines this year makes me interested in mechanical too...
Add to this I get to meet up with my old teammates and possibly get to go to the state competition with them.

As far as a time sink:
I'm working for a team that is not motivated or working hard enough... Last year, despite having more AP classes than anybody on the team, I would dedicate my time by staying for entire study sessions 2-2.5 hours a couple of days a week (to help others, work with my partners, help some builders), yet it annoys me how people bail on me, often over their AP/honors classes or SAT PREP! --I put in a lot of work to study what some of my partners don't take on and they often don't have time to stay to finish learning concepts that I try to teach for them. I continue to help out with my team with those I can as a graduated student... I also wish things were more coordinated, and that my time is more effectively used with the team. Just remembering a team from a few years back in which everybody would stay for hours after school, got along well and were friends, back then basically everybody got medals and the team was consistently in the top 2-4 for states.

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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby EastStroudsburg13 » January 25th, 2014, 8:00 pm

Well, since I was summoned... :P

What really got me into Science Olympiad, I think, was the entire aspect of the competition being based upon a team. Looking back, I'm not sure exactly why; I always preferred to work alone (I still do) and logically I wouldn't like the idea of my team not doing well and holding me back. However, that's what ended up doing it, and Science Olympiad became the thing where I felt I could lead, both by example and by action, for the betterment of a group. If I recall correctly, that was actually the first time I really took on a leadership role. So it was a great feeling for me, and when I was named co-captain of J.T. Lambert in my eighth grade year, I made sure that I would set an example for the rest of the team (there was also the fact that I had not medaled at states the previous year, and I didn't want that to happen again). Really, it was being named co-captain that really changed Science Olympiad from being a fun activity that I was okay at to something that I put forth a real commitment to excellence. (Interestingly, that was also the year I joined Scioly.org. Coincidence? Maybe not. ;) )

So that's what sucked me in. Now the question becomes, why did stick with it? Why did I continue putting forth so much time to Science Olympiad in high school when I had just helped my middle school to one of its best finishes in school history, and I had earned nine medals out of the ten events I competed in (stupid Science Word at states XD)? What more did I have to prove to myself or anyone else?

Well, you see, after the success of my eighth grade year, I was hooked. I longed for, I needed that feeling of glory when my school was called at an awards ceremony, when I went down to get my medal when I already had several clinking on my neck. But there was more in play than just that. I knew my high school, East Stroudsburg South had never qualified for states, and that despite the relative success of J.T. Lambert, the high school was never able to continue that. This was my chance to really create a tradition, really make something lasting, something I could say years down the road "I helped to build this". Now, as many of you who did both B and C know, I didn't realize what challenges there were going to be. Not only did I have to handle the more difficult events, but there was also the perceived stigma of a freshman coming in and trying to "take over" the team (I ended up with Astronomy just by clinging onto it for so long), and the fact that most of the high schoolers there were not willing to put in the effort necessary for success. So in my freshman year, a year after they had gotten 9th at regionals, we finished 15th.

Naturally, I was not happy with this, and it could easily have discouraged me into thinking, maybe this isn't worth all of the effort needed. But it was too late now, I had set this goal and I absolutely had to reach it. I expanded my commitment to Science Olympiad by suggesting invitationals, finding practice tests for people, and organizing all event logistics. I wanted to do everything possible so that we could make states. Did I have some doubts? Absolutely. After we missed states by two places in my junior year, I began to wonder if it was worth stressing myself even more to move over that hump. And yet, I did. Even somewhat to the detriment of other clubs, if I was going to keep doing well in school (especially chess, I had a worse record my senior year than my junior year, even though I played first board both years). Even considering the fact that I tend to thrive when under pressure, it was getting a bit much.

Luckily, this saga had a happy ending. Despite never having qualified for states before, our team, which had a great mix of seniors and underclassmen that was experienced from invitationals and previous years, dominated every team not named Athens, placing second with 13 total medals. Not only did we have great medaling performances, but it was a good all-around showing as well. That was the moment when I knew it had all been worth it: hearing our school being called for second place, holding that trophy, eating dinner with JTL knowing that this year we would both be attending states together, all of it was special to me.

Everything that happened at states then was gravy, and even though I would have liked to medal in more than just Astronomy, 10th place was beyond any goal I had set, and I knew that for the team to do this required every single member to put in his or her share of work. That's when I knew that even after I graduated, this was going to be okay. East Stroudsburg South was not a one time thing, but hopefully a year-to-year staple at states. I was proven right the following year, when the team managed to do something that I didn't, which was win a conference championship. It was tremendously fulfilling to know that all the work I had done since middle school helped to create something that will continue to evolve and grow in the future.

Some final thoughts to this wall of text: would I have been as devoted to Science Olympiad had I not attended J.T. Lambert or ES South, but a different school that had a team? The answer: I'm not sure. I would like to think so, but at a more competitive team, I may not have found that leadership niche I cherished so much, and at a less competitive team, making states may not have been realistic. It would seem that my location was particularly important; heck, it's in my username! However, I do think i would still have devoted a lot of time to it. Once I earned a medal, I suspect, I would have been nearly as motivated as I was here; it just happens that I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to create a lot of "firsts" at my high school.

So in summary, the following things caused me to spend so much time on SO: craving for success, ability to hold leadership and set an example, and the opportunity to make a real difference for my school. Probably pretty common things, but it happened in a bit of a unique way for me.

So that's my whole spiel. There you go, EFO. XD

One last thing: some people wonder why I keep going to tournaments and helping out, and why I stay active on here. Frankly, at this point, Science Olympiad is just a part of my life. Plus, it's great being able to go to tournaments and see everyone competing from "the other side" per se, knowing that at one point I was exactly where they are, not knowing what lay in store, but excited nonetheless. And ultimately I'd really like to hold some sort of position, either as the coach or assistant coach of a team, or as an assistant director (or even director) of a tournament somewhere. Not now of course, I have studies to attend to, but it's something that will always be in the back of my mind, so that maybe I'll be able to inspire someone just as I was inspired.
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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby Crazy Puny Man » January 25th, 2014, 8:57 pm

Oh man EAST, I hesitated to post on here but now I'm just going to spill :P

DISCLAIMER: some of this might belong in the "Proudest Moments" thread... :roll: ...

So I began SO as a wee little noob in 7th grade when my mom forced me to try out for the Wilbur Wright team. I didn't take it seriously that year (until after states haha), partly because I didn't want to study and partly because I had no idea how to. Then we qualified for nationals that year, and I began to take it seriously and I got my first nats medal to my complete surprise :shock: . Have to say though, that was mostly my partner's doing, he knew his stuff

That was the hook - qualifying for nationals and getting a nats medal. Thomas Jefferson has always dominated Indiana B; the second seed is usually fought between Stanley Clark and Wilbur Wright, and Stanley Clark inexplicably faded that year, so we nagged the second seed. The next year, after finally finding my motivation, I studied a lot, but we lost to Stanley Clark by 1 point. Our team was interesting that year - five 8th graders (including myself) had 4 events; one 9th grade had 3 events, and the rest had 2. The next year (now I'm in 9th grade) we came back with a vengeance - Stanley Clark was 4th, we finished 2nd at 104, our best state finish in our school's history :D But then we got 24th at nationals, our worst rank at nationals in our history :( (we got 23rd when I went as a 7th grader). Also I failed to medal, which was a goal I had in mind, but...well, I got over it. I guess it was foolish and self-centered to EXPECT a nats medal :P

In 2012, my 9th grade year, Munster put on a strong showing at state - they won more gold medals than any school, but still landed...6th. The high-schoolers were crushed, but were still happy for us. The next year (my first year in C), we became a lot more focused and were bent on beating Bloomington and our other rivals; but after the 2012 "debacle," we all walked into the awards ceremony with a sort of mental block, dearly hoping to qualify but still thinking we wouldn't trophy, let alone win...and we did, by a big margin, and to my surprise I won another nats medal :shock:

EDIT: I apologize to people from other Indiana schools who had to read this; I sincerely wish you the best of luck...but naturally, at the same time, I also want to beat you :P

I guess what motivates me is exactly what EAST said, except a little different - winning lots of medals, qualifying for nationals. I think I got 3 or 4 medals at states in my 9th and 10th grade years, in Div B and C? I can't remember, it was quite a few :lol: Now I'm in 11th grade and a captain of my school's team. I'm definitely not THE major reason why we suddenly rose up, but I'm proud to be a part of it :)

Once I found my niche in Division C, I loved how the events were more complicated and in-depth than B division. That's part of the reason I continue with SO to this day

Ugh I wish I could have more emoticons but the max is 10 >_>
Last edited by Crazy Puny Man on April 6th, 2014, 4:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Science Olympiad, a Timesink?

Postby zyzzyva980 » January 25th, 2014, 9:14 pm

Well, since I was summoned as well...

I initially joined Science Olympiad because the coach asked me too. Seriously. I was in her 8th grade science class, and she asked me to join, so I did. It gave me something to work on and, to be completely honest, I loved the competition aspect of it. I've always lived for competition and since I'm not athletically gifted, things like SO, debate, band, and the like give me an outlet to direct my competitive spirit. In truth, I joined Science Olympiad for the reasons I always tell people are the "wrong reasons." I wasn't really all that interested in science... that showed in the events I did (Compute This, Road Scholar...) and it shows in the major I chose (journalism). But I think Science Olympiad got to me. I definitely have a great interest in science now, so much so that I did add another major in a science field (CS).

As for why I stuck with it when things got busy in high school, well, you know that story already. For those that don't, the short version: Last year in B, we thought we were gonna make nats, we lost by two points (and felt robbed by the judges in a certain event). The core of the team (and coach) move up to high school together, we fight through adversity our first year and my junior year we make it to nats, my friend and partner through all of it wins a silver with me at nats, you know, the stuff they make inspirational movies about.

Balancing SO with extracurriculars is an area of specialty for me. I was extremely busy in high school with debate/forensics, band, Science Olympiad, and a handful of other clubs. Most of them met on Saturdays. I'd be lucky to have one Saturday free all semester. The key was communication. As soon as I got schedules I told my teachers, "I'm going to be going to this tournament and this tournament, and I can come to practice on this day, this day, and this day." They knew when I'd be coming in and that helped them to work with me too. You also have to prioritize what's more important to you. Fortunately this was almost always done for me. (one club's state tournament fell on an invite for another, and vice versa)

Leisure? This is the one thing that agonizes me about the classes below me. It's all study, study, study, I need to get into a good college, panic, apply to like twenty schools. That is ridiculous. You need leisure time. You need time to unwind or you are going to explode. It might not happen this year, it might not happen next year, it might not happen until you're well into college. But that much stress is bad for you. I had a board game club that met once a week that I went to just to balance out my life. I made sure to always know my limits when it came to that sort of thing, and when I felt it getting to me, I'd barricade myself in my room and watch old episodes of QI. For those that aren't having the problem EFO is, seriously, HAVE MORE FUN.

As for having too much leisure time... that can be a problem. Senioritis is rough and doesn't just apply to seniors. The fix here- you just have to know what you need to get done and get it done. I never used a planner or anything like that- I could never keep up with using it. But get stuff done when you can. Sometimes it's gonna suck because you have an essay due the next day that you haven't put as much effort into and now you have to fix that, but you just gotta do it. Convince yourself that there is no other option. You will do this project. You will get this done. I never considered turning anything in late or not studying for a tournament the next day because I refused to allow myself a way out of it. Yes, I watch a lot of TV and I think you'll find a surprising number of us waste a lot of time. But when it's time to get down to business... you gotta get down to business.

To answer your questions not in bold- I pride myself on looking at the world differently. I never want to go inside the box. And my philosophy in life is to NEVER STOP LEARNING. You can learn so much from anything, so learn anything you can from everything. Put aside fifteen minutes a day and watch a TED talk. Those things can get you inspired and motivated better than anything I know.

You can turn your leisure time into learning time. I learned a boatload of stuff about Arthurian legend and the story of Macbeth (clarification: the real Macbeth, not the one from that upstart Shakespeare) from watching a marathon session of Gargoyles last summer, a short-lived Disney channel classic that was really too smart for Disney or TV in general. I don't know how or why I stumbled upon the show, but I'm glad I did. Similarly, I learned pretty much all I know about Norse mythology from reading Colfer's addendum to H2G2 series last month. I suppose if I had actually watched either of the Thor movies that would've worked too, but I'm too cheap for movies. You might ask, what purpose is Arthurian legend or Norse mythology? Maybe not much in my everyday life, but I'd rather know it than not know it.

You know those what-if questions that your teachers in third grade told you to stop asking⸮ Keep asking those. Play devil's advocate and have fun with it. When we read Hamlet, everybody else in the class assumed that Claudius killed King Hamlet- except me. "But what if he didn't?" I asked constantly. Turns out I was wrong about that. Claudius did kill King Hamlet. But that's the kind of thinking that I use every day. How would people react if I did something unconventionally? What would happen if we changed something about x? Why do we simply assume y and take it for granted? Be imaginative. Be creative. Be inquisitive. Look at the world differently and learn everything you can from it.

TL;DR: What do you have better to do with your time than this? Go back to the top and read this again. It's important.

EDIT: Crazy Puny Man, that is the first time I've ever seen someone get to the max emoticon limit without having them all in a row. Impressive stuff.
Last edited by zyzzyva980 on January 25th, 2014, 9:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Clarification on Macbeth. For the record I believe all the Shakespeare conspiracies to be true.
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