Page 2637 of 2770

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 8:54 am
by gz839918
Booknerd wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 6:55 pm
Just curious, are other states' powerhouses mostly from suburban areas of the big cities in the state? Like in Illinois teams from towns outside of Chicago tend to do much better than ChiPubSchools, even though ChiPubSchools makes up almost a quarter of the total number of students in Illinois. *cough cough* suburb kids you're too good for us city kids

So are other states also dominated by suburban areas? Or does the big city dominate?
There's actually a divide by North/West versus South between the way public school systems are organized.

In the South, it's fairly common to see public school systems cover an entire county, while in the North and West, public school systems are more often fragmented: they serve only a town, a suburb, or some other specific subpopulation. For example, Indianapolis Public Schools is one of the most high-attention high-visibility districts within the city of Indianapolis, yet despite its name, it ironically serves a minority of the students in the city. This is because students in the Warren Township suburb of the city go to one school district, the Washington Township suburb goes to another district, and so forth, until only a minority of students in the city attend each district.

Not only does the South tend to have larger, broader districts, the South also saw itself targeted in many desegregation orders in the 1950s and 1960s. Following demands of civil rights activists backed by federal courts, school districts in the South started to send students across town borders, and even merged small districts into larger ones. Consequently, suburban students suddenly found themselves going to school in the city, and city students suddenly found themselves going to school in the suburbs. Although courts ordered a handful of Northern school districts to desegregate as well, the flurry of desegregation fell most heavily on the South because, hey, that's where Jim Crow laws were, so why desegregate the North?

In a classic example of Reverse Uno, some Southerners became proud of their integrated schools, and resisted attempts to resegregate schools, while the North and West grew steadily more segregated as few people paid attention to the former anti-confederacy states. So, while wealth flows from the suburbs into urban schools in the New South,* it's much rarer in the North and West. (*Of course, it's not all milk and honey in the South. Some Southern districts even suck at providing education to their affluent or white students. So, the New South usually refers to states that are doing better than others, which usually includes at least Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.) This is why many successful Southern public high schools are located in huge, county-wide districts, namely Enloe (in a district of 28 other high schools), TJHSST (21), Brookwood (21), Boca (23), North Meck (31), and many more. Heck, Enloe is just a short walk away from downtown Raleigh. Meanwhile, powerful teams in the North are frequently the only high school in their district, like New Trier, Adlai E. Stevenson, Carmel, Munster, Lake Central, Solon, Centerville, Acton-Boxborough, Northville, Syosset, Fayetteville-Manlius, Columbia, and plenty of others. These schools cater to suburbs rather than being one of many schools serving large urban areas.

That said, because suburban students attend urban districts in the South, what happens is that successful teams are mostly comprised of suburban students anyways. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 11:58 am
by sneepity
Pi-Bot has 99 posts!!! He's close to 100!!!
yay pi-bot

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 1:10 pm
by Pi-Bot
sneepity wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 11:58 am
Pi-Bot has 99 posts!!! He's close to 100!!!
yay pi-bot
Thanks, you too, and good luck to everyone going to a competition this weekend?
~~~ This message was posted completely with code (dm: no, ver: 2.0.0). If there is an error, please contact pepperonipi in the signature. ~~~

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 1:55 pm
by raytay
StOrYtImE!

So I was putting the ingredients in our bread machine and some part of me was like “Ooh let’s consume a handful of flour.” Yeah don’t do that. I currently have flour all over my shirt from coughing and the kitchen is a mess.

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 2:12 pm
by SilverBreeze
raytay wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 1:55 pm
StOrYtImE!

So I was putting the ingredients in our bread machine and some part of me was like “Ooh let’s consume a handful of flour.” Yeah don’t do that. I currently have flour all over my shirt from coughing and the kitchen is a mess.
Have you considered sitting down and having a talk with the part of you that said that. (I completely do not have a part of me that also says stuff like that)

Storytime:
I once spilled some water on the table and put a silica gel packet on it to see if the beads could absorb water through the plastic.

It can.

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 2:29 pm
by Booknerd
gz839918 wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 8:54 am
Booknerd wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 6:55 pm
Just curious, are other states' powerhouses mostly from suburban areas of the big cities in the state? Like in Illinois teams from towns outside of Chicago tend to do much better than ChiPubSchools, even though ChiPubSchools makes up almost a quarter of the total number of students in Illinois. *cough cough* suburb kids you're too good for us city kids

So are other states also dominated by suburban areas? Or does the big city dominate?
There's actually a divide by North/West versus South between the way public school systems are organized.

In the South, it's fairly common to see public school systems cover an entire county, while in the North and West, public school systems are more often fragmented: they serve only a town, a suburb, or some other specific subpopulation. For example, Indianapolis Public Schools is one of the most high-attention high-visibility districts within the city of Indianapolis, yet despite its name, it ironically serves a minority of the students in the city. This is because students in the Warren Township suburb of the city go to one school district, the Washington Township suburb goes to another district, and so forth, until only a minority of students in the city attend each district.

Not only does the South tend to have larger, broader districts, the South also saw itself targeted in many desegregation orders in the 1950s and 1960s. Following demands of civil rights activists backed by federal courts, school districts in the South started to send students across town borders, and even merged small districts into larger ones. Consequently, suburban students suddenly found themselves going to school in the city, and city students suddenly found themselves going to school in the suburbs. Although courts ordered a handful of Northern school districts to desegregate as well, the flurry of desegregation fell most heavily on the South because, hey, that's where Jim Crow laws were, so why desegregate the North?

In a classic example of Reverse Uno, some Southerners became proud of their integrated schools, and resisted attempts to resegregate schools, while the North and West grew steadily more segregated as few people paid attention to the former anti-confederacy states. So, while wealth flows from the suburbs into urban schools in the New South,* it's much rarer in the North and West. (*Of course, it's not all milk and honey in the South. Some Southern districts even suck at providing education to their affluent or white students. So, the New South usually refers to states that are doing better than others, which usually includes at least Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.) This is why many successful Southern public high schools are located in huge, county-wide districts, namely Enloe (in a district of 28 other high schools), TJHSST (21), Brookwood (21), Boca (23), North Meck (31), and many more. Heck, Enloe is just a short walk away from downtown Raleigh. Meanwhile, powerful teams in the North are frequently the only high school in their district, like New Trier, Adlai E. Stevenson, Carmel, Munster, Lake Central, Solon, Centerville, Acton-Boxborough, Northville, Syosset, Fayetteville-Manlius, Columbia, and plenty of others. These schools cater to suburbs rather than being one of many schools serving large urban areas.

That said, because suburban students attend urban districts in the South, what happens is that successful teams are mostly comprised of suburban students anyways. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Ah, I think I see the patterns now.

I just want to say some stuff about Illinois, more specifically Chicago Public Schools, one of the largest school districts in the country, which has some characteristics that I think might apply for other large cities with big school districts. (get ready for my long rant about CPS)

ChiPubSchools is notorious for its funding issues and has a handful of magnet/cluster schools. These magnet schools take in most of the best students from throughout the whole district through a notoriously competitive and selective system. 5 high schools are known to be extremely competitive (Walter Payton, Northside, Jones, Whitney Young, Lane Tech) and take all the highest-scoring students in the city. From all the 73,000 high school students in the city, only a couple thousand get into these schools. But there is a major gap between these top 5 high schools and all the other schools in Chicago. Although these schools are diverse and come from a variety of backgrounds (thanks to the tier system, which gives lower-income students a better chance), there is still a gap in terms of income, elementary school, and the schools that cause a bigger gap in academic standings between the schools. These 5 high schools are notorious for being extremely popular and providing high-quality learning to all the students, while other schools are... well... let's just say that its gonna be a while until the other high schools in the city get close to these top 5. Because of this, most students (and parents) want to go to these schools. It gets so competitive, that many parents sometimes pay for their child to get expensive test prep classes to prepare for the high school admission process (some parents say it's harder than college applications, but I'm pretty sure it's not that hard). What this does is provides a boost for those students who can afford the test prep, while many students are unable to afford it. Even though a student can get into a school without test prep, there still is an economic factor that is starting to make a difference to high school admissions. Another thing to note is that there are many magnet elementary schools that offer gifted programs and other programs of the like. These students are already at a major advantage, and take a good number of the seats open to the top 5 schools. This makes it a little harder for those coming from low-funded elementary schools without the programs to get a seat in these high schools. So there is a large number of students going into these top 5 schools, already above their grade-level standard. Because of this, these top 5 high schools are accelerating their learning and providing more to their students, while many other high schools in Chicago don't. This causes a MAJOR gap between the different high schools in Chicago. Many people have noticed this pattern within the high schools, and some have done research/studies on it. What they usually seem to find is that, with every passing year, it seems these top 5 are becoming more and more popular and selective. (end rant about CPS)

So Chicago Public Schools' main powerhouse teams come from these magnet high schools (as well as those elementary schools). Not only do they dominate SciOly, but almost every other extracurricular/competition as well. But even with these strong, magnet high schools that take some of the most talented people in the whole city, we are nowhere near the suburban schools.

As I said earlier, CPS has a MAJOR funding issue. If you don't know, we were on a 19-day strike during the fall because the Chicago Teachers Union were wanting more funding. This funding issue is seen almost nowhere else in the state. Other suburbs tend to have more higher-class backgrounds in comparison to Chi-town. So other schools in Illinois tend to have much more funding in scioly in comparison to Chicago. Some of our schools can barely afford paying nurses and teachers while suburb schools have fancy electronic whiteboards and TV screens in almost every classroom and hallway. So our schools can barely gather enough resources to start a scioly team, while suburb schools seem to have more than enough. Like, about half the teams at CPS regionals didn't do build events because they couldn't afford the resources to make the build, while other schools in the state have kits and a wealth of materials to test, rebuild, test, rebuild.

What I find interesting is that the suburban areas tend to have most of the things they need for a good scioly team: funding and good invitationals nearby. Big cities tend to hold most of the invitationals in the state, and the suburbs are usually seen dominating them. City schools often don't have the funds. Schools in other, obscure cities have the funds, but the competitive invites are probably out of reach. I guess that the suburbs are at the perfect place to dominate the state. Hopefully, the gap between funded/non-funded teams gets smaller in the future, but it probably won't happen that soon, even with support from things like the Urban Schools Initiative.

(Well, this turned out much longer than I thought it would be...)

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 4:31 pm
by JoeyC
Do we want to make a "Story Time" thread?

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 4:37 pm
by sneepity
JoeyC wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 4:31 pm
Do we want to make a "Story Time" thread?
yes, that would be pretty cool

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 7:19 pm
by MoMoney$$$;)0)
Just wondering in the new poll about when the garbage comes, of how the trash never comes? (I guess apartments don't count; but nevertheless I don't know, I might just be clueless).

Re: Your Daily Random Comment

Posted: May 25th, 2020, 7:28 pm
by JoeyC
sneepity wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 4:37 pm
JoeyC wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 4:31 pm
Do we want to make a "Story Time" thread?
yes, that would be pretty cool
It has been done