Cleaning Medals

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Skink
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Cleaning Medals

Post by Skink » February 14th, 2012, 2:15 pm

Nerdy SO problem here: I have a white medal that is a little dirty on the ribbon part with a black color...pencil dust or something. What can I use to get that out? Soak it in water? Isopropyl? Acetone? Clorox wipe? I'd prefer to leave the medal part untouched and restore the rest to a nice, clean white. What should I do? I don't even know what the ribbon part is made of, so that certainly doesn't help...

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Re: Cleaning Medals

Post by mnstrviola » February 14th, 2012, 5:50 pm

Skink wrote:Nerdy SO problem here: I have a white medal that is a little dirty on the ribbon part with a black color...pencil dust or something. What can I use to get that out? Soak it in water? Isopropyl? Acetone? Clorox wipe? I'd prefer to leave the medal part untouched and restore the rest to a nice, clean white. What should I do? I don't even know what the ribbon part is made of, so that certainly doesn't help...
You mean you don't carbon-freeze your trophies and then put a bullet-proof glass around them? :o

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Re: Cleaning Medals

Post by Skink » February 15th, 2012, 5:20 am

It's a long story. :?

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Re: Cleaning Medals

Post by Half-Blood-Princess » February 29th, 2012, 1:28 pm

lol
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Re: Cleaning Medals

Post by A Person » March 6th, 2012, 5:08 pm

mnstrviola wrote:
Skink wrote:Nerdy SO problem here: I have a white medal that is a little dirty on the ribbon part with a black color...pencil dust or something. What can I use to get that out? Soak it in water? Isopropyl? Acetone? Clorox wipe? I'd prefer to leave the medal part untouched and restore the rest to a nice, clean white. What should I do? I don't even know what the ribbon part is made of, so that certainly doesn't help...
You mean you don't carbon-freeze your trophies and then put a bullet-proof glass around them? :o
That's overkill! :o I usually just put the glass* around it and create a vacuum later.

*glass is two layers of plexiglass laminating some poly-carbonate resin...
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Re: Cleaning Medals

Post by LCovington » March 22nd, 2012, 12:39 pm

Skink wrote:Nerdy SO problem here: I have a white medal that is a little dirty on the ribbon part with a black color...pencil dust or something. What can I use to get that out? Soak it in water? Isopropyl? Acetone? Clorox wipe? I'd prefer to leave the medal part untouched and restore the rest to a nice, clean white. What should I do? I don't even know what the ribbon part is made of, so that certainly doesn't help...
Medal ribbons can be cleaned gently with a soft brush and vacuum cleaner. Attach a piece of soft plastic tubing to the smallest nozzle of your vacuum cleaner to prevent damage to the ribbon. Cover the nozzle with a piece of open-weave gauze fabric-net curtain or gauze bandage is ideal. Set the cleaner to its lowest suction level and gently vacuum the ribbon, using the soft brush to loosen ingrained dirt.

If the ribbon needs further cleaning, it may be dry-cleaned, but only if it can be detached from the medal. Do not wash the ribbon. Many of the dyes, especially the older silk dyes, run or "bleed" in water. While it may be possible to dry clean ribbons at home, it is safer to take them to a professional dry cleaner.

Ribbons should not be ironed. If they need to be flattened, place them between two sheets of blotting paper that have been very slightly dampened with distilled or deionised water. Place some heavy weights on top of the blotting paper for up to 30 minutes. You must be certain, however, before attempting this that the colours in the ribbon will not 'run' if they are dampened.

Sometimes ribbons have become so badly worn that replacements are required. These can be obtained from medal dealers, listed in the Yellow Pages of most phone books.

To reattach a ribbon to a medal, stitch it carefully with cotton or silk thread. Do not use staples or sticky tape to hold ribbons together.
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