Fossils B/C

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blufoster6
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by blufoster6 » September 23rd, 2009, 2:59 pm

jazzy009 wrote:Thanks for the help, guys. I've got another question:
What is the importance of a crinoid column?
I believe it was the stem or part of the stem of a crinoid.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by Deeisenberg » September 23rd, 2009, 5:15 pm

blufoster6 wrote:
jazzy009 wrote:Thanks for the help, guys. I've got another question:
What is the importance of a crinoid column?
I believe it was the stem or part of the stem of a crinoid.
Yes it was, a columnal of a crinoid would be a single disc that was a portion of the greater stem. The column would be the stem itself. I could be mistaken, but I don't believe I am.
soobsession wrote:im not sure about you guys...but we had no vertebrates on my test 'cept for osteichthyans....you can check the archived fossils thread...
If your event supervisor is really set on using only actual samples, then no, you probably won't get many vertebrates, because vertebrate fossils are (in general) less common, and also heavier and larger.

Most of the times however, vertebrates are covered quite a bit, they just use pictures instead of physical samples, at least in my experience.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by blufoster6 » September 23rd, 2009, 6:02 pm

Once you go over vertebrates a couple of times you pretty much get them down because they are fairly easy to remember and recognize.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by jazzy009 » September 25th, 2009, 5:51 pm

Currently on vertebrates, fish. Why are we studying shark teeth? Wouldn't it be pretty obvious if we get to a station and there is a tooth? Shark teeth are pretty easy to identify...

*edit* new question: what types of significant fossil discoveries might be asked? Things like the burgess shale? Or will they have to do specifically with each fossil?
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by jazzy009 » September 27th, 2009, 2:25 pm

Previous Question:
what types of significant fossil discoveries might be asked? Things like the burgess shale? Or will they have to do specifically with each fossil?

New Question:
I'm getting deep into vertebrates now, on a test are they going to show us fossil vertebrates or have they ever shown renditions of what they look like when alive (specifically dinosaurs)?
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gneissisnice
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by gneissisnice » September 27th, 2009, 6:00 pm

jazzy009 wrote:Previous Question:
what types of significant fossil discoveries might be asked? Things like the burgess shale? Or will they have to do specifically with each fossil?

New Question:
I'm getting deep into vertebrates now, on a test are they going to show us fossil vertebrates or have they ever shown renditions of what they look like when alive (specifically dinosaurs)?
Off the top of my head, I can think of the Burgess Shale, Green River, Wyoming (fish fossils, and I THINK it's in Wyoming, it might be a different state) and the place in China with the feathered dinosaurs.

And I've seen about equal pictures of vertebrate skeletons and reconstructed vertebrates. As for actually fossils in front of you, you might get shark teeth and bony fish, but that's really it, unless you get lucky at nats.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by soobsession » September 27th, 2009, 6:29 pm

i think theyve shown quite a variety of things for vertebrates...off the top of my head i can think of (from the old thread i think) footprints, fractures of bone (idk how you would id that), pics of dinos, skeleton/models of dinos, and stuff like that...i didnt have any dinos on my test so i cant really say much for myself (i got lucky there....im not that great at vertebrates)

as for famous fossil discovery things, you might also try major extinction periods/theories like the asteroid theory and stuff like that.

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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by Deeisenberg » September 28th, 2009, 8:21 am

Early tetrapods from Red Hill, PA.
There is an area of amazingly preserved dinosaur fossils in Mongolia (fighting dinosaurs came from there).
The Iguanadons in that Belgian mine (some of the first dinosaurs found)
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by jazzy009 » September 28th, 2009, 1:06 pm

Deeisenberg wrote:Early tetrapods from Red Hill, PA.
There is an area of amazingly preserved dinosaur fossils in Mongolia (fighting dinosaurs came from there).
The Iguanadons in that Belgian mine (some of the first dinosaurs found)
You mention a place in PA, did they do something that related to your area? I always think tests are going to be like that. Just wondering since you're from Harriton. Who was your Fossils partner? I met him last year.
I just read about the Mongolian fighting dinos last night. The actual specimen is pretty cool.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Post by Flavorflav » October 9th, 2009, 7:16 am

I would add La Brea, possibly Solnhofen for Archaeopteryx and others, and maybe Ischigualasto.

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