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Re: Solar System B

Posted: October 31st, 2009, 5:55 pm
by amerikestrel
robodude wrote:Wow, your school hasn't decided on events yet?
I'm supposed to take a tryout test on monday (the 2nd) to get into my school's Science Olympiad team. I've started studying for the events that I plan on doing, but my team hasn't. At least, not that I know of.

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 1st, 2009, 5:19 am
by AlphaTauri
Yeah, my school's the same way, only the tryout test is this Tuesday. I always thought we started really late compared to some other teams, but apparently not. I'm not even sure we'll have enough people for a 15-person team and alternates.

Ok, maybe we should get back on topic...

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 1st, 2009, 10:29 am
by amerikestrel
AlphaTauri wrote:Yeah, my school's the same way, only the tryout test is this Tuesday. I always thought we started really late compared to some other teams, but apparently not. I'm not even sure we'll have enough people for a 15-person team and alternates.

Ok, maybe we should get back on topic...
Good idea.

How much of the even has to do with calculations? Does it say anything about that in the rules? I can't check; unfortunately I lost my copy.

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 1st, 2009, 1:08 pm
by brobo
None of the practice tests I've taken have too much calculations, but you should definatly take a calculator. You should know basic formulas, like Escape Velocity, and also about the 3rd law of Kepler:
Kepler's Third Law wrote:The ratio of the squares of the revolutionary periods for two planets is equal to the ratio of the cubes of their semimajor axes:

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 1st, 2009, 4:00 pm
by amerikestrel
robodude wrote:None of the practice tests I've taken have too much calculations, but you should definatly take a calculator. You should know basic formulas, like Escape Velocity, and also about the 3rd law of Kepler:
Kepler's Third Law wrote:The ratio of the squares of the revolutionary periods for two planets is equal to the ratio of the cubes of their semimajor axes:
Ok, thanks.

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 3rd, 2009, 2:16 pm
by cooltiger
Ok, I've got my copy of the rules for solar system, so I'm going to read through them, and put in all the questions I've got.
Identification of the constellations containing all planets visible on the evening of the day of the competition, either with the unaided eye or a telescope.
That is a mouthful, I don't quite understand what it means.
Participants will attempt to identify and to place in sequential order the series of events in the geological history of one or more smal areas on the surface of a planet or satellite.
Can I get some example questions on this? I think I get it but I want to be sure.
Other than that I'm good.

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 3rd, 2009, 2:49 pm
by gyourkoshaven
cooltiger wrote:Can I get some example questions on this? I think I get it but I want to be sure.
Other than that I'm good.
(Can guarantee you won't get this question, but I haven't studied other planets enough.)

Put the following in order:Vaalbara, Pangea, Laurasia and Gondwana.

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 3rd, 2009, 2:59 pm
by amerikestrel
gyourkoshaven wrote:
cooltiger wrote:Can I get some example questions on this? I think I get it but I want to be sure.
Other than that I'm good.
(Can guarantee you won't get this question, but I haven't studied other planets enough.)

Put the following in order:Vaalbara, Pangea, Laurasia and Gondwana.
Wait a minute, weren't Laurasia and Gondwana part of Pangea?

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 3rd, 2009, 3:00 pm
by SOninja
for ur first question, you might want to use this website (originally for RFS): http://www.heavens-above.com/
they have skycharts,& info on planets/constellations.
if you go to planets summary, you'll be able to see what constellations each planet is in currently.

Re: Solar System B

Posted: November 3rd, 2009, 3:07 pm
by AlphaTauri
As for the second one, what I assume that means is that they'll show a "map" of impacts on the surface of a made-up planet and you'll have to determine which one came first, second, etc. They might also ask about significant impacts on the moons or the planets themselves.