Meteorology B

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby zyzzyva980 » Mon Mar 15, 2010 6:41 pm

So do we. Study storms, they aren't likely to be a big part of the test but know the basics, definitely.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby smarticle13 » Tue Mar 16, 2010 11:44 pm

for me, one of the hardest part of meteorology is learning and identifying the types of clouds
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby AlphaTauri » Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:35 am

There's this cloud dichotomous key from Marshall, and while it's oversimplified, it does help you ID different types of clouds.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby zyzzyva980 » Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:36 am

It helps a lot to put pictures of the clouds and their description in your notes. That's what I do. It shouldn't take up much space (against that six-point font you should be using even small pictures will look big) and it shouldn't be hard to locate pictures.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby smarticle13 » Wed Mar 17, 2010 2:28 pm

AlphaTauri wrote:There's this cloud dichotomous key from Marshall, and while it's oversimplified, it does help you ID different types of clouds.


Thanks!
The website helps with narrowing down the possible options the cloud could be.
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Dynamic Planet (2nd place and 3rd place)
Elevated Bridge (3rd place)
Meteorology (1st place, 2nd place, 3rd place, 3rd place and another one at State!)
Road Scholar (1st place)
Shock Value (3rd place)
Solar System (1st place, 4th place)
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby soobsession » Wed Mar 17, 2010 7:46 pm

zyzzyva98 wrote:It helps a lot to put pictures of the clouds and their description in your notes. That's what I do. It shouldn't take up much space (against that six-point font you should be using even small pictures will look big) and it shouldn't be hard to locate pictures.


it also helps if you know some of the roots like nimbus, cirrus, and stratus...

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby brobo » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:33 pm

Good point. Once you know HOW to identify clouds, its easy to do. You don't need to remember the name for every cloud, theres a few tricks:
Prefix:
Strato, Nimbo- LOW
Alto- MIDDLE
Cirro- HIGH

Once you know the height/elevation, you know the beginning of your cloud name. Then you just need to know the root, or what it looks like:
Cumulus- Puffy, groups of small clouds
Stratus- Sheet, flat like

The only exceptions are:
cirrus (high, wispy clouds- remember that cirro means high, and cirro/cirrus sound a lot alike) and cumulus (low, puffy It has no prefix because it has vertical development) or Cumulonimbus (cumulus + rain, thunderstorms, bad weather)

You use the prefix Strato to mean low EXCEPT when the root is stratus, because you wouldn't say "stratostratus". So you change "strato" to "nimbo" and say "nimbostratus"
So find the prefix based on elevation, add the root based on appearance, and you have your cloud!
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby smarticle13 » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:48 pm

13 Medals:
Dynamic Planet (2nd place and 3rd place)
Elevated Bridge (3rd place)
Meteorology (1st place, 2nd place, 3rd place, 3rd place and another one at State!)
Road Scholar (1st place)
Shock Value (3rd place)
Solar System (1st place, 4th place)
We've Got Your Number (1st place)

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby zyzzyva980 » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:59 pm

robodude wrote:Good point. Once you know HOW to identify clouds, its easy to do. You don't need to remember the name for every cloud, theres a few tricks:
Prefix:
Strato, Nimbo- LOW
Alto- MIDDLE
Cirro- HIGH

Once you know the height/elevation, you know the beginning of your cloud name. Then you just need to know the root, or what it looks like:
Cumulus- Puffy, groups of small clouds
Stratus- Sheet, flat like

The only exceptions are:
cirrus (high, wispy clouds- remember that cirro means high, and cirro/cirrus sound a lot alike) and cumulus (low, puffy It has no prefix because it has vertical development) or Cumulonimbus (cumulus + rain, thunderstorms, bad weather)

You use the prefix Strato to mean low EXCEPT when the root is stratus, because you wouldn't say "stratostratus". So you change "strato" to "nimbo" and say "nimbostratus"
So find the prefix based on elevation, add the root based on appearance, and you have your cloud!


Those aren't all the clouds though, there are some weird ones that aren't as common but still worth studying.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby smarticle13 » Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:11 pm

In my opinion, the hardest clouds to identify when given a picture are:
altostratus
altocumulus
cirrostratus
cirrocumulus
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Dynamic Planet (2nd place and 3rd place)
Elevated Bridge (3rd place)
Meteorology (1st place, 2nd place, 3rd place, 3rd place and another one at State!)
Road Scholar (1st place)
Shock Value (3rd place)
Solar System (1st place, 4th place)
We've Got Your Number (1st place)

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby brobo » Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:20 pm

zyzzyva98 wrote:
robodude wrote:Good point. Once you know HOW to identify clouds, its easy to do. You don't need to remember the name for every cloud, theres a few tricks:
Prefix:
Strato, Nimbo- LOW
Alto- MIDDLE
Cirro- HIGH

Once you know the height/elevation, you know the beginning of your cloud name. Then you just need to know the root, or what it looks like:
Cumulus- Puffy, groups of small clouds
Stratus- Sheet, flat like

The only exceptions are:
cirrus (high, wispy clouds- remember that cirro means high, and cirro/cirrus sound a lot alike) and cumulus (low, puffy It has no prefix because it has vertical development) or Cumulonimbus (cumulus + rain, thunderstorms, bad weather)

You use the prefix Strato to mean low EXCEPT when the root is stratus, because you wouldn't say "stratostratus". So you change "strato" to "nimbo" and say "nimbostratus"
So find the prefix based on elevation, add the root based on appearance, and you have your cloud!


Those aren't all the clouds though, there are some weird ones that aren't as common but still worth studying.

Yes, but its a lot easier to memorize the rest when you have somewhere to start, like here. Now instead of memorizing 10+ clouds, you only need to memorize this list and maybe 5 others.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby smarticle13 » Thu Mar 18, 2010 5:44 pm

Its not memorizing them that is the tricky part, it is identifying them when given a picture.
13 Medals:
Dynamic Planet (2nd place and 3rd place)
Elevated Bridge (3rd place)
Meteorology (1st place, 2nd place, 3rd place, 3rd place and another one at State!)
Road Scholar (1st place)
Shock Value (3rd place)
Solar System (1st place, 4th place)
We've Got Your Number (1st place)

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby zyzzyva980 » Sat Mar 20, 2010 1:36 am

And that's why you put pictures in your notes!
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby smarticle13 » Sat Mar 20, 2010 12:39 pm

zyzzyva98 wrote:And that's why you put pictures in your notes!


that's true, though the pictures should be small to take up less space.
13 Medals:
Dynamic Planet (2nd place and 3rd place)
Elevated Bridge (3rd place)
Meteorology (1st place, 2nd place, 3rd place, 3rd place and another one at State!)
Road Scholar (1st place)
Shock Value (3rd place)
Solar System (1st place, 4th place)
We've Got Your Number (1st place)

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby brobo » Sat Mar 20, 2010 9:36 pm

However, most pictures found on the Internet are really good pictures of clouds, where there's no way of mistaking what type it is. A good proctor would take thier own picture where the cloud shapes are less defined, so you shouldn't depend on pictures in your notes. Not that you shouldn't have pictures in your notes, but you also need to be able to identify clouds without the aid of pictures or guides to help you, just in case.
Last edited by brobo on Sun Mar 21, 2010 12:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
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