Hydraulics and Pneumatics

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Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby Paradox21 » September 14th, 2009, 7:11 am

What does it mean for hydraulics and pneumatics to be in a closed system rather than an open one?
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby htmlfreak » September 14th, 2009, 5:46 pm

You can't have air from the outside connecting into your pneumatic system, an example is an open tube manometer (well maybe not for this event). As long as your pneumatic/hydraulic system is surrounded or enclosed completely and has no contact with anything outside the let's say "container", you should be fine. Anyone who disagrees please say so :P
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby andrewwski » September 14th, 2009, 6:23 pm

I don't have the rules, but that sounds right to me. A closed system would be one that does not let gas or liquid in or out.
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby DeltaHat » September 14th, 2009, 7:40 pm

Simple example of a closed hydraulic/pneumatic system: two syringes attached tip to tip with fish tank tubing.

When you push down on one, the other extends. If the system is filled with fluid, then it is hydraulic. If it is filled with air, then it is pneumatic.
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby fleet130 » September 14th, 2009, 8:29 pm

Examples of open systems might be a waterwheel or windmill. Would an engine that runs on compressed air be considered a closed system if it exhausts the air to the atmosphere as it leaves the engine? What if the exhaust air is captured into a waste accumulator? Is it a closed system if the energy transmitting fluid is recirculated? Example: a fan blowing air to drive a turbine inside an enclosed circular duct.
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby hassan5082508 » November 8th, 2009, 9:51 am

is it ok to have a co2 canister blow a golf ball? or is that considered an unenclosed system?

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby andrewwski » November 8th, 2009, 11:45 am

That wouldn't be a closed system. There's gas leaving the system.
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby Flavorflav » November 8th, 2009, 12:18 pm

andrewwski wrote:That wouldn't be a closed system. There's gas leaving the system.

What if the co2 inflated a balloon, though? That should count.

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby Sir_L_Jenkins » November 8th, 2009, 12:48 pm

Flavorflav wrote:
andrewwski wrote:That wouldn't be a closed system. There's gas leaving the system.

What if the co2 inflated a balloon, though? That should count.



I would imagine, although you would have to make sure the balloon does not pop, which would cause the CO2 to escape, then it would be an open system and not count.
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby Uncle Fester » November 8th, 2009, 1:37 pm

Yesterday at Build-It-Day (Indianapolis), Dark Sabre hooked a windshield washer pump he got from salvage to a large chem-use syringe via plastic tubing. Took all of five minutes to do, including wiring. EASILY pushed out the syringe at a nice and easy speed with plenty of force (read: foolproof use of hydraulics).

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby Dark Sabre » November 8th, 2009, 2:33 pm

I took some pictures as I was doing it, so now you can see what I made on the Hydraulics Wiki.

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby Flavorflav » November 10th, 2009, 5:30 am

Why do risky things that could cost points?[/quote]

For fun? I can imagine a fairly simple system in which a motor turned a canister which holds a cartridge of compressed gas, forcing in onto a spike which is on the vented lid, around which fits the balloon. You can get the whole setup (minus motor and clamp) for a few bucks at a head shop - it's called a "cracker," and I won't tell you what the original purpose is to avoid giving anyone any ideas.

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby cypressfalls Robert » November 29th, 2009, 9:41 pm

DeltaHat wrote:Simple example of a closed hydraulic/pneumatic system: two syringes attached tip to tip with fish tank tubing.

When you push down on one, the other extends. If the system is filled with fluid, then it is hydraulic. If it is filled with air, then it is pneumatic.

i found syringes hard to find until I stumbled upon meat flavor injectors which are syringes. :)

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby cypressfalls Robert » December 29th, 2009, 1:53 pm

In the syrringe system , is it easier or harder for the syrringe to move with water inside it? (I'm just wondering because i have nothing inside my syrringes right now, other than air, and would probably wan't an opinion before I took apart the setup).

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Postby binary010101 » December 29th, 2009, 4:21 pm

I think water would respond faster.

Your syringes can't leak? That's a problem for us.
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