Hydraulics and Pneumatics

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Breaking Yaytz
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by Breaking Yaytz » April 7th, 2010, 8:02 pm

Okay, so now I have the pump all hooked up to a 60 mL syringe, but it doesn't even have enough power to suck water up, let alone move the syringe. I flipped the polarity also with no success.

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by cypressfalls Robert » April 7th, 2010, 8:54 pm

Breaking Yaytz wrote:Okay, so now I have the pump all hooked up to a 60 mL syringe, but it doesn't even have enough power to suck water up, let alone move the syringe. I flipped the polarity also with no success.
Ok we had this problem too, the syringes, after a while ,kinda get stuck and so right before our run we have to push them in an out and loosen them up and they work for like a few minutes...this is bad, any solutions

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by Flavorflav » April 8th, 2010, 9:41 am

Dark Sabre wrote:If I had to guess, I would say that the barbed fitting is the outlet, since that would be the only tube under positive pressure. I'm not sure why there are two others at the moment.
While that makes good sense, I can't think of an automotive application which would have two intakes and one outlet. It looks like a washer fluid pump, and I believe that the barbed fitting is the intake and the two smooth fittings are the outlets, one of which would be intended to go to each of the two wipers.

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by Uncle Fester » April 8th, 2010, 10:31 am

Check the instruction sheet & electrical connector(s) for polarity markings. Reverse polarity, besides a rather comical surprise effect, causes severe wear on just about any pump type in SECONDS, whether there's water supplied or not.
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Breaking Yaytz
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by Breaking Yaytz » April 8th, 2010, 6:27 pm

I just thought of a painfully simple solution, if it is considered an enclosed pneumatic system. I took a small syringe and glued shut the end that lets air in. Then, I pulled the syringe out to its full extent and tied it with a thin string. By rigging up a mousetrap, I managed to break the string, making the syringe pull back inside because of the low pressure and had it trigger a mousetrap. Is this considered pneumatics?

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by Primate » April 8th, 2010, 11:19 pm

Breaking Yaytz wrote:I just thought of a painfully simple solution, if it is considered an enclosed pneumatic system. I took a small syringe and glued shut the end that lets air in. Then, I pulled the syringe out to its full extent and tied it with a thin string. By rigging up a mousetrap, I managed to break the string, making the syringe pull back inside because of the low pressure and had it trigger a mousetrap. Is this considered pneumatics?
It depends what the next action is following the breaking of the string. The syringe shoots back into the tube because of the low pressure, but what does this trigger?
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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by penclspinner » April 8th, 2010, 11:30 pm

Breaking Yaytz wrote:I just thought of a painfully simple solution, if it is considered an enclosed pneumatic system. I took a small syringe and glued shut the end that lets air in. Then, I pulled the syringe out to its full extent and tied it with a thin string. By rigging up a mousetrap, I managed to break the string, making the syringe pull back inside because of the low pressure and had it trigger a mousetrap. Is this considered pneumatics?
I had set up something very similar to that idea which made me so amazed at people talking about using pumps and how much trouble they were having figuring out this task.

It's a lot simpler than it seems.

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by cypressfalls Robert » April 9th, 2010, 4:21 am

penclspinner wrote:
Breaking Yaytz wrote:I just thought of a painfully simple solution, if it is considered an enclosed pneumatic system. I took a small syringe and glued shut the end that lets air in. Then, I pulled the syringe out to its full extent and tied it with a thin string. By rigging up a mousetrap, I managed to break the string, making the syringe pull back inside because of the low pressure and had it trigger a mousetrap. Is this considered pneumatics?
I had set up something very similar to that idea which made me so amazed at people talking about using pumps and how much trouble they were having figuring out this task.

It's a lot simpler than it seems.
yea its easier than it looks, one team used a sandwichbag and dropped something on one end and something shot up on the other end.

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Re: Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Post by 11madmic » April 9th, 2010, 6:33 pm

we have a 5oo gram mass press down on a 1ml syring that is filled with water and pushes up a 3ml syringe that activates a mouse trap. it works really fast and have had no problems with it. we tried to use a 100 ml syringe and it took to much initial force to start it moving and makes the time vary. our goal is to run everything but the moving mass in short amount of time possible like 3 seconds and use our super accurate timing on our moving mass to finish the rest of the time. this garentees us we are within a second of the time given. after states i will post a vid, it is pretty sleek bc it is made of plexyglass. Suprisingly we had absolutely no outside help with construction but just like 200 hours of work. :D
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