Dynamic Planet B/C

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The Eviscerator
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby The Eviscerator » April 18th, 2011, 3:06 pm

A couple pages back, someone mentioned calculating "rouse." Could someone explain what "rouse" is? I googled it, but all I could find was the last name of someone and "rouse belts," which are related to earthquakes...

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby gigaboo » April 18th, 2011, 10:04 pm

My test was plotting points, contouring a map, circling a drainage basin and a couple questions. We didn't need our notes at all.

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby personasaurus rex » April 19th, 2011, 10:08 am

The Eviscerator wrote:A couple pages back, someone mentioned calculating "rouse." Could someone explain what "rouse" is? I googled it, but all I could find was the last name of someone and "rouse belts," which are related to earthquakes...

The Rouse number is a non-dimensional number in fluid dynamics which is used to define a concentration profile of suspended sediment and which also determines how sediment will be transported in a flowing fluid.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby The Eviscerator » April 19th, 2011, 10:29 am

personasaurus rex wrote:
The Eviscerator wrote:A couple pages back, someone mentioned calculating "rouse." Could someone explain what "rouse" is? I googled it, but all I could find was the last name of someone and "rouse belts," which are related to earthquakes...

The Rouse number is a non-dimensional number in fluid dynamics which is used to define a concentration profile of suspended sediment and which also determines how sediment will be transported in a flowing fluid.
^Wikipedia <3 haha

:oops: I can't believe I forgot to check wikipedia... Thanks though, that clears it up a lot.

Edit: How have you guys been getting your information? I've just been googling things and it seems like I'm missing some things... Do you guys use textbooks, and which ones?

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby emd19 » April 19th, 2011, 11:00 am

The Rouse number is a non-dimensional number in fluid dynamics which is used to define a concentration profile of suspended sediment and which also determines how sediment will be transported in a flowing fluid. It is a ratio between the sediment fall velocity and the upwards velocity on the grain as a product of the von Kármán constant and the shear velocity .


However, as I asked before, should we learn about this? Will they ask us to calculate it?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby junexia » April 19th, 2011, 4:01 pm

i don't know if this has already been asked, but what sources is everyone using for world's largest rivers/lakes? i've looked at a couple of different sources, and each one listed them in different orders
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby personasaurus rex » April 19th, 2011, 7:26 pm

emd19 wrote:The Rouse number is a non-dimensional number in fluid dynamics which is used to define a concentration profile of suspended sediment and which also determines how sediment will be transported in a flowing fluid. It is a ratio between the sediment fall velocity and the upwards velocity on the grain as a product of the von Kármán constant and the shear velocity .


However, as I asked before, should we learn about this? Will they ask us to calculate it?

I doubt this will be asked. It's very complicated physics. This event will stick mostly with geography. The hardest test I've taken was mostly IDing, types of lakes, and interpreting graphs. Even at my state level, the test was disappointingly easy and barely went beyond basic vocabulary...
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby strikerbear10 » April 20th, 2011, 2:27 pm

Could someone please give me a good website for topo maps?

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby The Eviscerator » April 20th, 2011, 2:46 pm

strikerbear10 wrote:Could someone please give me a good website for topo maps?

topomaps.usgs.gov
The test probably won't have many questions on topo maps though... Even if they do, they will probably be very basic things that you can use common sense and figure out.
Last edited by The Eviscerator on April 20th, 2011, 3:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby bwy » April 20th, 2011, 3:38 pm

The Eviscerator wrote:
strikerbear10 wrote:Could someone please give me a good website for topo maps?

topomaps.usgs.gov
The test probably won't have many questions on topo maps though... Even if they do, they will probably be very basic things that you can use common sense and figure out.


On the contrary, my regionals test was just 3 topo maps, with a lot of questions about them.
It was pretty hard, but i managed to get 3rd :)

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby The Eviscerator » April 20th, 2011, 3:44 pm

bwy wrote:
The Eviscerator wrote:
strikerbear10 wrote:Could someone please give me a good website for topo maps?

topomaps.usgs.gov
The test probably won't have many questions on topo maps though... Even if they do, they will probably be very basic things that you can use common sense and figure out.


On the contrary, my regionals test was just 3 topo maps, with a lot of questions about them.
It was pretty hard, but i managed to get 3rd :)

What questions on topo maps did you have?
On my regionals test, the test was about 1/3 map, but it only asked basic things, like find the lowest elevation, highest elevation, tributaries of a river, sinuosity ratio of a river, etc.

*EDIT: Question: Is hydraulic head essentially the height of groundwater above sea level? I know that it is the pressure groundwater is exerting and is calculated relative to a datum, such as sea level, and since you can directly calculate hydraulic gradient from it, this seems to make sense to me. I know this is probably an over-simplification, but oh well.

Also, can someone explain Darcy's Law more in depth? I'm looking at the wikipage for it (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seepage#Darcy.27s_law), but I have no idea how to calculate the rate of pore pressure...

Also, do you guys think that putting a list of common Chezy and Manning coefficients and permeability coefficients on the sheets is necessary?

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby bwy » April 21st, 2011, 9:44 pm

The Eviscerator wrote:
bwy wrote:
On the contrary, my regionals test was just 3 topo maps, with a lot of questions about them.
It was pretty hard, but i managed to get 3rd :)

What questions on topo maps did you have?
On my regionals test, the test was about 1/3 map, but it only asked basic things, like find the lowest elevation, highest elevation, tributaries of a river, sinuosity ratio of a river, etc.

*EDIT: Question: Is hydraulic head essentially the height of groundwater above sea level? I know that it is the pressure groundwater is exerting and is calculated relative to a datum, such as sea level, and since you can directly calculate hydraulic gradient from it, this seems to make sense to me. I know this is probably an over-simplification, but oh well.

Also, can someone explain Darcy's Law more in depth? I'm looking at the wikipage for it (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seepage#Darcy.27s_law), but I have no idea how to calculate the rate of pore pressure...

Also, do you guys think that putting a list of common Chezy and Manning coefficients and permeability coefficients on the sheets is necessary?

chezy and manning coefficients sounds like overkill. i never needed them for regionals or states, just the equations and basic plugging in.
hydraulic head is pretty confusing, but according to wikipedia it sounds like it's basically the height of water relative to something. it could be sealevel, or it could even be the depth from the ground to the water, or it could be how high water rises in a tube when put in an aquifer according to the stuff I've read.

the topo test i took asked about stream order, gradient, sinuosity ratio, what certain symbols meant, direction of stream flow, alluvial landforms (that question was hard but I can't remember exactly what it was asking...)
sorry i'm probably not being very helpful. ;)

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby personasaurus rex » April 22nd, 2011, 7:52 am

bwy wrote:
The Eviscerator wrote:What questions on topo maps did you have?
On my regionals test, the test was about 1/3 map, but it only asked basic things, like find the lowest elevation, highest elevation, tributaries of a river, sinuosity ratio of a river, etc.

*EDIT: Question: Is hydraulic head essentially the height of groundwater above sea level? I know that it is the pressure groundwater is exerting and is calculated relative to a datum, such as sea level, and since you can directly calculate hydraulic gradient from it, this seems to make sense to me. I know this is probably an over-simplification, but oh well.

Also, can someone explain Darcy's Law more in depth? I'm looking at the wikipage for it (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seepage#Darcy.27s_law), but I have no idea how to calculate the rate of pore pressure...

Also, do you guys think that putting a list of common Chezy and Manning coefficients and permeability coefficients on the sheets is necessary?

chezy and manning coefficients sounds like overkill. i never needed them for regionals or states, just the equations and basic plugging in.
hydraulic head is pretty confusing, but according to wikipedia it sounds like it's basically the height of water relative to something. it could be sealevel, or it could even be the depth from the ground to the water, or it could be how high water rises in a tube when put in an aquifer according to the stuff I've read.

the topo test i took asked about stream order, gradient, sinuosity ratio, what certain symbols meant, direction of stream flow, alluvial landforms (that question was hard but I can't remember exactly what it was asking...)
sorry i'm probably not being very helpful. ;)

The only question I've ever encountered on Chezy-Manning is "what is the label for this symbol?" and the answer was m/s for velocity haha.
And for hydraulic head, although it does involve pressure, etc, I doubt they'll go any deeper than height above a reference point. That reference point is almost always sea level.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby The Eviscerator » April 23rd, 2011, 7:31 pm

Thanks.
Anybody have a good way of measuring the length of a stream on a topographic map without a string? We just kind of twisted the ruler around to get the length, which seemed kind of imprecise... :?

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby rfscoach » April 24th, 2011, 4:43 am

The Eviscerator wrote:Thanks.
Anybody have a good way of measuring the length of a stream on a topographic map without a string? We just kind of twisted the ruler around to get the length, which seemed kind of imprecise... :?


Photo copy a ruler on to the edge of one of your cheat sheets.
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