Astronomy C

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jayadh
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by jayadh » April 7th, 2011, 10:17 am

EASTstroudsburg13 wrote:Thanks. :) It's just those blasted Athens people I can't seem to overcome. And after looking over the results, I've started to realize exactly how close we were. I'm hoping next year we get to the point where we beat Lehighton.
I have come to resent the name Athens.. for obvious reasons. And you WILL! Be positive! (this coming from me :P) Good Luck!!! :)
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by QuantumLeaper » April 17th, 2011, 2:42 pm

I did not do this event this year, but I really would like to do it next year. It's my first year in SO (my middle school did not do it :( ) and I was wondering what component of the astronomy test would be considered the most difficult so that I can prepare ahead of time. Thanks!
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Infinity Flat » April 17th, 2011, 2:47 pm

QuantumLeaper wrote:I did not do this event this year, but I really would like to do it next year. It's my first year in SO (my middle school did not do it :( ) and I was wondering what component of the astronomy test would be considered the most difficult so that I can prepare ahead of time. Thanks!
The formulas for the math problems can be difficult to find and understand,. I recommend the wiki, as well as the NASA space math worksheets.
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by FullMetalMaple » April 17th, 2011, 2:52 pm

Agreed, the physics aspect can be very difficult, as well as the vast amount of information you need to know. Concepts can be difficult to understand sometimes. Astronomy is not an easy event (not that I'm saying there are any truly easy events), but if you can study hard enough, it feels great to be able to do it.

Also, for identifications, it can be difficult if you can't find good images. Definitely use NASA.

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Infinity Flat » April 17th, 2011, 2:55 pm

FullMetalMaple wrote:Also, for identifications, it can be difficult if you can't find good images. Definitely use NASA.
To add on to that, there's usually there's a Chandra Observatory article on each of the Deep Space Objects you have to identify. You can get great information and pictures out of those.
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Gillen » April 17th, 2011, 2:57 pm

I think the hardest part is the vast amount of information required. The topic is so broad and encompasses so many things that it is hard to know enough.

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Luo » April 17th, 2011, 3:20 pm

Infinity Flat wrote:To add on to that, there's usually there's a Chandra Observatory article on each of the Deep Space Objects you have to identify. You can get great information and pictures out of those.
I agree that Chandra pictures are the most useful during the exams.
Gillen wrote:I think the hardest part is the vast amount of information required. The topic is so broad and encompasses so many things that it is hard to know enough.
Luckily, that's why you get to use a laptop! It's not as necessary to "know" all the information as it is to organize it on your computer well and be able to reference it quickly during the exam. Of course, it's much more time-efficient if you actually know all the stuff of the top of your head, but with the sheer breadth of knowledge required, it's impractical.
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by FullMetalMaple » April 17th, 2011, 3:27 pm

Infinity Flat wrote:To add on to that, there's usually there's a Chandra Observatory article on each of the Deep Space Objects you have to identify. You can get great information and pictures out of those.
In fact, all the pictures and information on my regional test were from there.
luo wrote:Luckily, that's why you get to use a laptop!
And don't forget it's actually one per team member, not per team. It can help to split things between you and your partner and have different things on different computers. My partner had all the physics equations, while I had all the identifications and other information. Our state proctor thought it was funny, but hey, use the rules to your advantage.

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Gillen » April 17th, 2011, 3:35 pm

Having two computers can be helpful if you need to split the test up, like I had to at state. There were 100 questions, so me and my partner split it up and ended up getting first.
Last edited by Gillen on April 17th, 2011, 3:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Luo » April 17th, 2011, 3:41 pm

FullMetalMaple wrote:And don't forget it's actually one per team member, not per team. It can help to split things between you and your partner and have different things on different computers. My partner had all the physics equations, while I had all the identifications and other information. Our state proctor thought it was funny, but hey, use the rules to your advantage.
Gillen wrote:Having computers can be helpful if you need to split the test up, like I had to at state. There were 100 questions, so me and my partner split it up and ended up getting first.
Yes, it's best to have two computers so that you can split the test up with your partner. And save every single webpage you find! I don't think it ever puts you at a disadvantage in Astronomy to have too much information saved.
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