Astronomy C

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Gillen » April 17th, 2011, 2:57 pm

I think the hardest part is the vast amount of information required. The topic is so broad and encompasses so many things that it is hard to know enough.

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Luo » April 17th, 2011, 3:20 pm

Infinity Flat wrote:To add on to that, there's usually there's a Chandra Observatory article on each of the Deep Space Objects you have to identify. You can get great information and pictures out of those.

I agree that Chandra pictures are the most useful during the exams.
Gillen wrote:I think the hardest part is the vast amount of information required. The topic is so broad and encompasses so many things that it is hard to know enough.

Luckily, that's why you get to use a laptop! It's not as necessary to "know" all the information as it is to organize it on your computer well and be able to reference it quickly during the exam. Of course, it's much more time-efficient if you actually know all the stuff of the top of your head, but with the sheer breadth of knowledge required, it's impractical.
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby FullMetalMaple » April 17th, 2011, 3:27 pm

Infinity Flat wrote:To add on to that, there's usually there's a Chandra Observatory article on each of the Deep Space Objects you have to identify. You can get great information and pictures out of those.

In fact, all the pictures and information on my regional test were from there.

luo wrote:Luckily, that's why you get to use a laptop!

And don't forget it's actually one per team member, not per team. It can help to split things between you and your partner and have different things on different computers. My partner had all the physics equations, while I had all the identifications and other information. Our state proctor thought it was funny, but hey, use the rules to your advantage.

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Gillen » April 17th, 2011, 3:35 pm

Having two computers can be helpful if you need to split the test up, like I had to at state. There were 100 questions, so me and my partner split it up and ended up getting first.
Last edited by Gillen on April 17th, 2011, 3:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Luo » April 17th, 2011, 3:41 pm

FullMetalMaple wrote:And don't forget it's actually one per team member, not per team. It can help to split things between you and your partner and have different things on different computers. My partner had all the physics equations, while I had all the identifications and other information. Our state proctor thought it was funny, but hey, use the rules to your advantage.

Gillen wrote:Having computers can be helpful if you need to split the test up, like I had to at state. There were 100 questions, so me and my partner split it up and ended up getting first.

Yes, it's best to have two computers so that you can split the test up with your partner. And save every single webpage you find! I don't think it ever puts you at a disadvantage in Astronomy to have too much information saved.
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby QuantumLeaper » April 18th, 2011, 9:50 am

Wow, thank you all so much for the tips and information! Astronomy is at the top of my event wish list for next year, so it's really useful to have the input of people who have done this event. I can't wait till SO 2011-2012. :D
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby AlphaTauri » April 18th, 2011, 1:06 pm

luo wrote:Yes, it's best to have two computers so that you can split the test up with your partner. And save every single webpage you find! I don't think it ever puts you at a disadvantage in Astronomy to have too much information saved.
My partner and I used my laptop (which had about half of Wikipedia/NASA/Chandra saved on it) at Regionals, along with a binder for quick reference. We did the whole split-screen thing, with me bringing up the info I needed on half the screen and him using the other half of the screen.
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby FullMetalMaple » April 18th, 2011, 3:06 pm

QuantumLeaper wrote:Wow, thank you all so much for the tips and information! Astronomy is at the top of my event wish list for next year, so it's really useful to have the input of people who have done this event. I can't wait till SO 2011-2012. :D

You're welcome, and if you have any more questions, I'm quite willing to help. Astronomy is a great (though difficult) event; I'm glad to see interest in it.
Gillen wrote:Having two computers can be helpful if you need to split the test up, like I had to at state. There were 100 questions, so me and my partner split it up and ended up getting first.

100 questions? Ouch, we didn't get that many even at state. The very first time I ever did Astronomy, though, there were at least 117.

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Gillen » April 18th, 2011, 3:13 pm

FullMetalMaple wrote:100 questions? Ouch, we didn't get that many even at state. The very first time I ever did Astronomy, though, there were at least 117.

It wasn't quite as bad as it sounds, they were all multiple choice. It answered itself a lot, too, since there were groups of questions about the same topic. That has been by far the most questions I have ever seen on an astronomy test, though.

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby FullMetalMaple » April 18th, 2011, 3:17 pm

Haha. Our state test was ridiculously difficult. There were a lot of really complicated physics problems with the Doppler effect, and we only got two minutes per question (until we got to the speed round, where it was 30 seconds).

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Gillen » April 18th, 2011, 3:28 pm

FullMetalMaple wrote:Haha. Our state test was ridiculously difficult. There were a lot of really complicated physics problems with the Doppler effect, and we only got two minutes per question (until we got to the speed round, where it was 30 seconds).

I would rather have a test like that, since my partner doesn't know much about astronomy but is good at math. There was almost no math on my test, so although we did split it up, I ended up doing almost the whole thing.

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby ChrisYim » April 18th, 2011, 5:35 pm

noooo!!!!!!! i thought we did really good but we only got 11th place..... :?

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby EastStroudsburg13 » April 19th, 2011, 12:31 pm

There are pictures and info about each of the DSO's on the Astronomy Wiki right now. I had planned on putting more specific information on the sections (it's really bare right now) but I haven't had time yet.
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Luo » April 27th, 2011, 11:21 am

For anyone who has done and/or studied the 2010 Nationals test, do you know how to determine the answers for questions #1 and 2? My first thought was to simply compare the resolutions of each image, but that seems too simplistic, and it doesn't quite fit with the correct answers.

Also, how would one determine the absolute magnitude of a main-sequence star based solely upon the star's absorption spectrum, as is required in Part C, question #4 of the 2009 Nationals test? Would computing redshift be required?
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Infinity Flat » April 27th, 2011, 5:51 pm

luo wrote:For anyone who has done and/or studied the 2010 Nationals test, do you know how to determine the answers for questions #1 and 2? My first thought was to simply compare the resolutions of each image, but that seems too simplistic, and it doesn't quite fit with the correct answers.

Also, how would one determine the absolute magnitude of a main-sequence star based solely upon the star's absorption spectrum, as is required in Part C, question #4 of the 2009 Nationals test? Would computing redshift be required?


I haven't seen the 2010 test, so can't give an answer to that.

For the 2009 test, you want to find out its spectral type (O B A etc) and from there you can approximate its absolute magnitude using an H-R diagram.
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